Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 611 items for :

  • Slavic and Eurasian Studies x
  • Upcoming Publications x
  • Just Published x
  • Search level: Titles x
Clear All
Leben und Sterben einer polnisch-jüdischen Stadt: Tarnów 1918–1945
Series:  FOKUS, Volume: 5
Dies ist die Geschichte einer Stadt in Polen, Tarnów, in den Jahren 1918–1945, in der die Hälfte der Bevölkerung vor dem Zweiten Weltkrieg jüdisch war. Die große Mehrheit der Juden in Polen lebte in Städten und ihre Geschichte eröffnet eine alternative Sichtweise auf die Geschichte Polens.
Das Buch erzählt über den Alltag des multiethnischen Tarnów, überschreitet aber zeitliche Zäsuren und beschreibt, wie das soziale Gewebe zerriss, als die Deutschen 1939 einmarschierten. Diese Studie zeigt auf, wie sich das Verhältnis der nichtjüdischen Polen zu ihren jüdischen Nachbarn während des Holocaust wandelte und wie letztere um ihr Überleben kämpften. Durch das Prisma einer Stadt werden die wichtigsten Fragen polnisch-jüdischer Beziehungsgeschichte gestellt, u.a. zur Rolle der nichtjüdischen Polen während des Holocaust und zum Antisemitismus im Polen der Nachkriegszeit.
Transylvania has some of the most valuable monuments of medieval architecture in Europe. The oldest church was built in the 10th century, but most others came into being only after 1200. Later changes have considerably modified the appearance of still-standing buildings. Written sources are lacking for answers to questions about the identity of the builders and patrons. Countering the idea that only standing structures can reflect the history of medieval churches in Transylvania, this book uses archaeological sources in order to answer some of those questions and to bring to light the hidden past of many monuments.
In The Eastern Christian Tradition in Modern Russian Thought and Beyond, Teresa Obolevitch reflects on the ontology and anthropology of neo-patristic synthesis and its connection to Western philosophy, with a focus on the work of Georges Florovsky and Vladimir Lossky. The book also examines the concept of apophaticism in Russian philosophy: in neo-patristic synthesis and the thought of Semyon Frank and Lev Karsavin, as well as in epistemological and cosmological comparison with process theology. Additionally, Obolevitch’s work undertakes a comparative analysis of the reception of Russian sophiology in the West, especially in the work of Thomas Merton, and also considers similarities between neo-patristic synthesis and Zen Buddhism in the thought of Merton and Sergey Horujy.
Dolgan is a severely endangered Turkic language spoken in the extreme north of the Russian Federation which has undergone noticeable substrate influence and thus exhibits grammatical structures differing from other Turkic languages. The grammar at hand is the first fully-fledged grammar of Dolgan in English language: It describes the Dolgan language system from an internal perspective basing on corpus data of natural Dolgan speech. It takes historical, comparative and typological perspectives, if applicable, but refrains from pertaining to a particular linguistic theory. Consequently, both Turcologists and general linguists can make use of it independently from their individual research question.
Volume Editor: Anti Selart
The Baltic Crusades in the thirteenth century led to the creation of the medieval Livonia. But what happened after the conquest? The contributors to this volume analyse the cultural, societal, economic and technological changes in the Baltic Sea region c. 1200–1350. The chapters focus on innovations and long-term developments which were important in integrating the area into medieval European society more broadly, while also questioning the traditional divide of the Livonian post-crusade society into native victims and foreign victors. The process of multilateral negotiations and adaptions created a synthesis which was not necessarily an outcome of the wars but also a manifestation of universal innovation processes in northern Europe.
Contributors are Arvi Haak, Tõnno Jonuks, Kristjan Kaljusaar, Ivar Leimus, Christian Lübke, Madis Maasing, Mihkel Mäesalu, Anti Selart, Vija Stikāne, and Andres Tvauri.