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Plundering and taking home precious objects from a defeated enemy was a widespread activity in the Greek and Hellenistic-Roman world. In this volume literary critics, historians and archaeologists join forces in investigating this phenomenon in terms of appropriation and cultural change. In-depth interpretations of famous ancient spoliations, like that of the Greeks after Plataea or the Romans after the capture of Jerusalem, reveal a fascinating paradox: while the material record shows an eager incorporation of new objects, the texts display abhorrence of the negative effects they were thought to bring along. As this volume demonstrates, both reactions testify to the crucial innovative impact objects from abroad may have.
In this series, Eric Cullhed (University of Uppsala) and S. Douglas Olson (University of Minnesota) combine to provide the reader with a new critical edition of the Greek text of Byzantine scholar and rhetorician Eustathius of Thessalonica’s Commentary on the Odyssey, composed during the latter half of the twelfth century CE. A much desired facing English translation of the Commentary is included as well. Eustathius’ commentary collects material from a wide range of sources which explain or expand on words, phrases and ideas in the Homeric epic. His original comments are blended with extracts from earlier commentators, especially the Homeric scholia. The text is also an important source for fragments of lost works of ancient literature, for the history of exegesis and lexicography, and for Byzantine cultural history. Full critical, citation and source apparatuses are included.
This publication is also available online.
Antidorus, Dionysius Iambus, Epigenes, Lysanias, Parmenon, Silenus, Simaristus, Simmias
SGG 1 offers the first critical edition of, and commentaries on, the textual fragments of the ancient Greek grammarians Antidorus, Dionysius Iambus, Epigenes, Lysanias, Parmenon, Silenus, Simaristus, and Sim(m)ias. All of these personalities belong, or so plausibly appear, to the early Hellenistic period (3rd-2nd centuries BC) and share a special interest in glossographical issues (mainly discussions of problems concerning lexical usages and customs, in Greek literature as well as in ordinary life of their times) and/or in literary history. Each entry includes: a biographical and cultural profile of the grammarian; the text of testimonies and fragments critically edited, translated, and analytically commented on; a thorough bibliography; and indices. Translation, critical apparatus, and commentary are in Italian.