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Plundering and taking home precious objects from a defeated enemy was a widespread activity in the Greek and Hellenistic-Roman world. In this volume literary critics, historians and archaeologists join forces in investigating this phenomenon in terms of appropriation and cultural change. In-depth interpretations of famous ancient spoliations, like that of the Greeks after Plataea or the Romans after the capture of Jerusalem, reveal a fascinating paradox: while the material record shows an eager incorporation of new objects, the texts display abhorrence of the negative effects they were thought to bring along. As this volume demonstrates, both reactions testify to the crucial innovative impact objects from abroad may have.
Didymus Alexandrinus. The Fragments of the Commentaries on Comedy
Didymus of Alexandria (also known as Chalcenterus, ‘bronze-guts’, for his outstanding ability to ‘digest’ and rework the scholarship of his predecessors) played a pivotal role in the understanding and reception of many classical Greek authors, both in antiquity and in modern times. His commentaries on the comic playwrights influenced ancient and modern scholarship alike and constitute to this day an invaluable repository of information for the study of ancient Greek comedy, the history of Hellenistic philology, and more. This is the first critical edition (with English translation and commentary) of all the extant fragments of Didymus’ commentaries on the comic playwrights.
How Latin philosophical vocabulary developed through the translation of Greek sources, the varieties of translation practices Roman philosophers favoured, and how these practices evolved over time are the overarching themes of this monograph. A first of its kind, this comparative study analyzes the creation of philosophical vocabulary in Lucretius, Cicero, Apuleius, Calcidius, and Boethius. It highlights a Latin literary tradition in which the dominance of Greek philosophical expression was challenged and renovated over time through the individual translation choices of different Latin authors. Included are full glossaries of Latin and Greek philosophical terms with explanatory notes for the reader.
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If you read a work by Cicero or Seneca and then open The Pilgrimage of Egeria, Augustine, or Gregory of Tours, you will soon notice that Late Latin authors quote authorities differently. They provide a perfect example of synthesising two potentially conflicting traditions – “classical” and “biblical”. This book examines how the system of direct discourse marking developed over the centuries. It focuses on selecting marking means, presents the dynamics of change and suggests factors that might have been at play. The author guides the reader on the path that goes from the Classical prevalence of inquit to the Late innovative mix of marking words including the very classical inquit, an increased use of dico, the newly recruited ait, and dicens, influenced by biblical translations. The book suggests that Late authors tried to make reading and understanding easier by putting quotative words before quotations and increasing the use of redundant combinations (e.g. “he answered saying”).
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This book focuses on one of the basic – yet still rather neglected in Latin linguistics– grammatical categories: comparison of adjectives and adverbs. Which Latin adjectives and adverbs allow for comparative and superlative forms, and which ones do not? This question may seem trivial to those working with modern languages but is not at all trivial in the case of a dead language such as Latin that has no native speakers and a limited corpus of written texts. Based on extensive data collection, the book aims to provide today’s readers of Latin with some objective criteria for determining the answer.
In this series, Eric Cullhed (University of Uppsala) and S. Douglas Olson (University of Minnesota) combine to provide the reader with a new critical edition of the Greek text of Byzantine scholar and rhetorician Eustathius of Thessalonica’s Commentary on the Odyssey, composed during the latter half of the twelfth century CE. A much desired facing English translation of the Commentary is included as well. Eustathius’ commentary collects material from a wide range of sources which explain or expand on words, phrases and ideas in the Homeric epic. His original comments are blended with extracts from earlier commentators, especially the Homeric scholia. The text is also an important source for fragments of lost works of ancient literature, for the history of exegesis and lexicography, and for Byzantine cultural history. Full critical, citation and source apparatuses are included.
This publication is also available online.
This study argues that the establishment of the millennium binding of Satan and the vindication of the saints in Revelation 20:1–6 are cohesively linked with Jesus’s victorious battle in Revelation 19:11–21. The major implication of this analysis views both these events as consequent effects of Christ’s victory at the eschatological battle. Applying systemic functional linguistics and discourse analysis of cohesion, this study advances critical scholarship on the Book of Revelation by offering the first fully sustained answer to this frequently debated question regarding Satan’s binding from a modern linguistic approach.
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Much can be learned about a translation’s linguistic and cultural context by studying it as a text, a literary artifact of the culture that produced it. However, its nature as a translation warrants a careful approach, one that pays attention to the process by which its various features came about. In Characterizing Old Greek Deuteronomy as an Ancient Translation, Jean Maurais develops a framework derived from Descriptive Translation Studies to bring both these aspects in conversation. He then outlines how the Deuteronomy translator went about his task and provides a characterization of the work as a literary product.
Studying the Indo-European languages means having a privileged viewpoint on diachronic language change, because of their relative wealth of documentation, which spans over more than three millennia with almost no interruption, and their cultural position that they have enjoyed in human history.
The chapters in this volume investigate case-studies in several ancient Indo-European languages (Ancient Greek, Latin, Hittite, Luwian, Sanskrit, Avestan, Old Persian, Armenian, Albanian) through the lenses of contact, variation, and reconstruction, in an interdisciplinary and intradisciplinary way. This reveals at the same time the multiplicity and the unity of our discipline(s), both by showing what kind of results the adoption of modern theories on “old” material can yield, and by underlining the centrality and complexity of the text in any research related to ancient languages.
By applying a stylistic analysis within a systemic-functional linguistic framework, this study argues that Luke's construal of the Jerusalem Council in Acts 15 and its co-thematic passages attempt to persuade Jewish believers of Luke's audience not to separate from multi-ethnic churches, a goal that is accomplished through subverting the value orientations of a prominent Noahic tradition within Second Temple Jewish literature that promotes strict Jewish isolation from Gentiles. As a result, this study breaks fresh methodological ground in the linguistic study on the New Testament and also advances critical scholarship on the book of Acts.