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England’s Early Africa Companies and their Traders, 1618-1672
This book directs its main focus to the Guinea Company and its members, aiming to understand the genealogy of several major changes taking place in the English Atlantic and in the Anglo-Africa trade in the 17th century and beyond. Little focus has been directed at the companies that preceded the Royal African Company, launched in 1672, and through presenting the Guinea Company - the earliest of England’s chartered Africa companies, and its relationship with the influential men who became its members, the book questions the inevitability of the Atlantic reality of the later seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Through its members, the Guinea Company emerged as a purpose-built structure with the ability to weather a volatile trade undergoing fundamental change.
Views of the Cuban Communist Party on the Collapse of Soviet and Eastern European Socialism
In Cuba Was Different, Even Sandvik Underlid explores the views of Cuban authorities, official press, and Party members as they reflect back on the collapse of Soviet and Eastern European socialism. In so doing, he contributes to a better understanding as to why the Cuban system – often associated with Fidel Castro’s leadership – did not itself collapse. Despite the loss of its most important allies, key ideological referents, and even most of its foreign trade, Cuba did not embrace capitalism.

The author critically examines and analyzes the collapse of the USSR and Eastern Europe as reported in the Cuban Communist Party newspaper Granma, both as they unfolded and subsequently through the lens of additional interviews with individual Party members. This focus on Cuba’s Communist Party provides new perspectives on how these events were seen from Cuba and on the notable resilience of many party members.
Based on a multi-year ethnography in one Spanish-speaking community in New Jersey, this book is a meticulous account of six Mexican families that explores the relationship between siblings’ language use patterns, practices, and ideologies. Combining insights gained from language socialization and heritage language studies within the larger field of sociolinguistics, the book’s findings examine siblings’ sociolinguistic environments and the ways in which these Latino children use and view their multilingual resources in the home, school, and broader community. This study emphasizes the links between siblings’ language ideologies, agentive decision making, and linguistic patterns, and the ways in which birth order influences the different dimensions of heritage language maintenance in the U.S..
Dorothy Fujita-Rony’s The Memorykeepers: Gendered Knowledges, Empires, and Indonesian American History examines the importance of women's memorykeeping for two Toba Batak women whose twentieth-century histories span Indonesia and the United States, H.L.Tobing and Minar T. Rony. This book addresses the meanings of family stories and artifacts within a gendered and interimperial context, and demonstrates how these knowledges can produce alternate cartographies of memory and belonging within the diaspora. It thus explores how women’s memorykeeping forges integrative possibility, not only physically across islands, oceans, and continents, but also temporally, across decades, empires, and generations. Thirty-five years in the making, The Memorykeepers is the first book on Indonesian Americans written within the fields of US history, American Studies, and Asian American Studies.
Ecuador’s “Good Living”: Crises, Discourse, and Law by Gallegos Anda, presents a critical approach towards the concept of Buen Vivir that was included in Ecuador’s 2008 Constitution. Due to its apparent legal novelty, this normative formula received much praise from multiple civil society and academic circles by forging what some argued to be a new development paradigm based on Andean epistemologies. Gallegos Anda theorizes this important phenomenon through an inductive analysis of context and power relations. Through a masterful navigation through epistemological fields, the author offers a critical theory of Buen Vivir that focuses on changing citizenship regimes, a retreating state, politicised ethnic cleavages, discursive democracy and the emergence of an empty signifier. Gallegos-Anda is the first to situate Buen Vivir in a theoretical context grounded in international human rights law.
This volume critically examines gender inequality, its origins, and its social and economic implications in Latin America, with a particular focus on Ecuador. For that purpose, Pablo Quiñonez and Claudia Maldonado-Erazo bring together a collection of articles that provide insights from different disciplines, including political economy, history, development studies, political science, microeconomics, and macroeconomics.

In Ecuador, as in Latin America as a whole, women dedicate more time than men to unpaid activities while being discriminated against in multiple areas, including labor markets, politics, and access to high-ranking positions. Furthermore, these problems are even greater for women from rural areas and ethnic minorities.

Contributors include: Rafael Alvarado, María Anchundia Places, Esteban Arévalo, Diana Cabrera Montecé, Edwin Espinoza Piguave, Gabriela Gallardo, Danny Granda, Claudia Maldonado-Erazo, Wendy Mora, Diana Morán Chiquito, Sayonara Morejón, Carlos Moreno-Hurtado, María Moreno Zea, Ana Oña Macías, Pablo Ponce, Pablo Quiñonez, Valeria Recalde, Josefina Rosales, Ximena Songor-Jaramillo, and Daniel Zea
Lessons from Founders E. Franklin Frazier, W.E.B. Du Bois, and the Atlanta School of Sociology
Volume Editor: Lori Latrice Martin
In Introduction to Africana Demography: Lessons from Founders E. Franklin Frazier, W.E.B. Du Bois, and the Atlanta School of Sociology scholars from across the country wed Black Sociology with critical demography within an Africana Demography framework. Contributors speak to innovative ways to address pressing issues and have the added benefit of affording many of the scholars denied their rightful place in the sociological and demographic canons. Specifically, the book includes an introduction outlining Africana demography and chapters that provide a critique of conventional demographic approaches to understanding race and social institutions, such as the family, religion, and the criminal justice system.


Contributors include: Lori Latrice Martin, Anthony Hill, Melinda Jackson-Jefferson, Maretta McDonald, Weldon McWilliams, Jack S. Monell, Edward Muhammad, Brianne Painia, Tifanie Pulley, David I. Rudder, Jas M. Sullivan, Arthur Whaley, and Deadric Williams.
Geographies of Law and Accumulation in Mexico
In contrast to analyses that view systemic violence in Mexico as simply the result of drugs and criminality, a deviation of a well-functioning market economy and/or a failing and corrupt state, Muñoz Martínez argues in Uneven Landscapes of Violence that the nexus of criminality, illegality and violence is integral to neoliberal state formation. It was through this nexus that dispossession took place after 2000 in the form of forced displacement, extorsion and private appropriation of public funds along with widespread violence by state forces and criminal groups. The emphasis of the neoliberal agenda on the rule of law to protect private property and contracts further reshaped the boundaries between legality and illegality, concealing the criminal and violent origins of economic gain.