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At the same time whimsical and thought-provoking, Fluxus explored everyday life as an object of art. Behind mundane materials and activities, we find a large network of Fluxus artists who worked together for decades to create and share their art. This publication builds on archival materials that expose the nature of the artists’ working relationships, and methods for collaboration and circulation of artworks. It traces both people and things, exploring how the network expanded and was made solid, from Fluxus’s conception in the 1960s, to the 1990s, when it had eventually left its stealth flight under art history’s radar.
Volume Editor:
This second volume of Theaters and Public Sphere in a Global and Digital Society offers several different case studies in their relationship with society. Also here, the focus is the fundamental contribution that artistic and cultural forms bring to social dynamics and how these can consolidate cohabitation and create meaningfullness, in addition to fulfilling economic and regulatory needs. As symbolic forms of collective social practices, artistic and cultural forms weave the meaning of a territory, a context, and a people, but also of the generations who traverse these same cultures.
These forms of meaning interact with the social imagery, mediate marginalization, transform barriers into bridges, and are the indispensable tools for any social coexistence and its continuous rethinking in everyday life.

Contributors are: Claudio Bernardi, Marco Bernardi, Massimo Bertoldi, Martina Guerinoni, Mara Nerbano, Chiara Pasanisi, Benedetta Pratelli, Roberto Prestigiacomo, Ilaria Riccioni, Daniela Salinas Frigerio, Eleonora Sparano, Emanuele Stochino, Matteo Tamborrino, Tiziana Tesauro, Katia Trifirò, Alessandro Tolomelli, and Andrea Zardi.
Volume Editor:
Somaesthetics and Sport brings together a diverse set of explorations into the embodied experience of watching and playing sport. Sport can at once be a source of sensual beauty and pleasure, and also of pain and anguish; spectators can both celebrate and glorify athletes, but also expect certain forms of behaviour, and intentionally or otherwise police the movements of their bodies; sport and physical exercise can improve our health and increase the self-awareness of our abilities and limitations, but they also help us to shape our sense of what it means to live a good life. 
Philanthropy, the Arts, and the State in Leipzig (1750-1918)
This book offers a novel approach to the history of high culture and new perspectives on the history of civil society in provincial Germany. It makes the concept of place a central means for understanding how art culture was defined, consumed, and, importantly, distributed over the course of the long nineteenth century. It shows how “temples of culture” come to be built where they were built. It further demonstrates who participated in their planning, funding, construction, and ultimate evolution into public institutions, highlighting underexamined links between the history of art culture and that of urban history and civil society.
Abhinavagupta on Dance and Dramatic Acting
Author:
What is Dance? What is Theatre? What is the boundary between enacting a character and narrating a story? When does movement become tinted with meaning? And when does beauty shine alone as if with no object? These universal aesthetic questions find a theoretically vibrant and historically informed set of replies in the oeuvre of the eleventh-century Kashmirian author Abhinavagupta. The present book offers the first critical edition, translation, and study of a crucial and lesser known passage of his commentary on the Nāṭyaśāstra, the seminal work of Sanskrit dramaturgy. The nature of dramatic acting and the mimetic power of dance, emotions, and beauty all play a role in Abhinavagupta’s thorough investigation of performance aesthetics, now presented to the modern reader.
A Traditional Song Text from Guangxi in Southern China
Editors / Translators: and
This is an annotated edition of a traditional song text, written in the Zhuang character script. The Brigands’ Song is part of a living tradition, sung antiphonally by two male and two female singers. The song is probably unique in presenting the experiences of ordinary men and women during wartime in pre-modern China. The narrative relates how the men are sent off to war, fighting as native troops on behalf of the Chinese imperial armies. The song dates from the Ming dynasty and touches on many topics of historical significance, such as the use of firearms and other operational details.
This book is the first full text and translation of a prosimetric tale from the rich repertoire of Central and West Asian bards to be published with ready access to recordings of both the prose narration and the sung verse. In Iranian Khorasan, bards known as bakhshi present tales that in other regions are performed wholly in a Turkic language with prose narration in Persian, Khorasani Turkish or Kurmanji Kurdish and most verses in Turkish. We compare portions of the full performance transcribed here with excerpts from two performances of Iranian bakhshis in the 1970s. Three introductory chapters and a commentary discuss musical and verbal dimensions of the bakhshi’s art in relation to relevant social, historical, and literary contexts.
Author:
In Conscious Theatre Practice: Yoga, Meditation, and Performance, Lou Prendergast charts a theatre research project in which the notion of Self-realisation and related contemplative practices, including Bikram Yoga and Vipassana meditation, are applied to performance. Coining the term ‘Conscious Theatre Practice’, Prendergast presents the scripts of three publicly presented theatrical performances, examined under the ‘three C’s’ research model: Conscious Craft (writing, directing, performance; Conscious Casting; Conscious Collaborations.
The findings of this autobiographical project fed into a working manifesto for socially engaged theatre company, Black Star Projects. Along the way, the research engages with methodological frameworks that include practice-as-research, autoethnography, phenomenology and psychophysical processes, as well immersive yoga and meditation practice; while race, class and gender inequalities underpin the themes of the productions.
Young People, Applied Theatre, and Education about Race
This innovative project wrapped research around a youth theatre project. Young people of colour and from refugee backgrounds developed a sustained provocation for the people of Geelong, a large regional centre in Australia. The packed public performance—at the biggest venue in town—challenged locals to rethink assumptions. The audience response was insightful and momentous. The companion workshops for schools had profound impact with adolescent audiences. Internationally, this book connects with artistic, educational, and research communities, offering a substantial contribution to understandings of racism. This book is a provocative, transdisciplinary meditation on race, culture, the arts and change.