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Volume Editors: and
Fighting arts have their own beauty, internal philosophy, and are connected to cultural worlds in meaningful and important ways. Combining approaches from ethnomusicology, ethnochoreology, performance theory and anthropology, the distinguishing feature of this book is that it highlights the centrality of the pluripotent art form of pencak silat among Southeast Asian arts and its importance to a network of traditional and modern performing arts in Southeast Asia and beyond.
By doing so, important layers of local concepts on performing arts, ethics, society, spirituality, and personal life conduct are de-mystified. With a distinct change in the way we view Southeast Asia, this book provides a wealth of information about a complex of performing arts related to the so-called 'world of silat'.
An ancillary media companion website (www.bits4culture.org/pencaksilatandmusic/) is part of this work. Login authorisation information is included in the book.
Contributors include: Bussakorn Binson, Jean-Marc de Grave, Gisa Jähnichen, Margaret Kartomi, Zahara Kamal, Indija Mahjoeddin, Ako Mashino, Paul H. Mason, Uwe U. Paetzold, Kirstin Pauka, Henry Spiller and Sean Williams.
The World of Emotions and States of Mind in Peony Pavilion
Passion, Love, and Qing examines the vitality of Peony Pavilion, the most famous drama in Ming China (1368-1644), through four essays (by Isabella Falaschi, Paolo Santangelo, Tian Yuan Tan, and Rossella Ferrari) and an extensive Glossary of specific terms and expressions related to the representation of emotions and states of mind. It explores the evolution and permanence of the universal message about passion or emotions contained in the language of the play. Written in the late Ming, Peony Pavilion embodies the new trends in the ‘cult of passions’ and new sensibility of the times. It is also a rich intertext of love that both inherits the legacy of earlier literary traditions and influences later amatory literature and theatrical performances.
Accompanying video material to the work can be found here.
Dress and Identity Construction in Ambon from 1850 to 1942
Drawing on extensive research, Hulsbosch explores dress and adornment of the Ambonese people of the Central Maluku Islands, in Indonesia, during the last century of Dutch colonial rule. She demonstrates how visual identity formation is a lived experience and an active, constant innovation that is not only a response to society, but simultaneously drives and shapes society. This long overdue text documents sartorial expression of the colonizer (the Dutch) and the colonized (the Ambonese) and investigates previously ignored history of indigenous and Western
women living in a colonial context. This book is a visual feast designed and written to appeal to scholars and the general public alike.
Volume Editor:
Images of Familial Intimacy in Eastern and Western Art offers a comparative art and socio-historical analysis of selected images of familial intimacy in Asia and Europe from the pre-modern era to the present day based on an examination of the value systems and expectations existing at the time in the regions in which the works were created.

A wide variety of images are discussed ranging from family portraits and depictions of the home in seventeenth-century Dutch genre paintings, ukiyoe prints and fusuma sliding wall panels of the Edo period, to familial images made after the Korean War of 1950-53, providing the reader with a rare insight into the evolution East and West of the cultural norms and customs impacting on the family and personal space.

This collection of original essays explores the rise of popular print media in China as it relates to the quest for modernity in the global metropolis of Shanghai from 1926 to 1945. It does this by offering the first extended look at the phenomenal influence of the Liangyou pictorial, The Young Companion, arguably the most exciting monthly periodical ever published in China. Special emphasis is placed on the profound social and cultural impact of this glittering publication at a pivotal time in China.

The essays explore the dynamic concept of "kaleidoscopic modernity" and offer individual case studies on the rise of "art" photography, the appeals of slick patent medicines, the resilience of female artists, the allure of aviation celebrities, the feistiness of women athletes, representations of modern masculinity, efforts to regulate the female body and female sexuality, and innovative research that locates the stunning impact of Liangyou in the broader context of related cultural developments in Tokyo and Seoul.

Contributors include: Paul W. Ricketts, Timothy J. Shea, Emily Baum, Maura Elizabeth Cunningham, Jun Lei, Amy O'Keefe, Hongjian Wang, Ha Yoon Jung, Lesley W. Ma, Tongyun Yin, and Wang Chuchu.