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Volume Editors: and
This volume brings together thirteen case studies devoted to the establishment, growth, and demise of holy places in Muslim societies, thereby providing a global look on Muslim engagement with the emplacement of the holy. Combining research by historians, art historians, archaeologists, and historians of religion, the volume bridges different approaches to the study of the concept of “holiness” in Muslim societies. It addresses a wide range of geographical regions, from Indonesia and India to Morocco and Senegal, highlighting the strategies implemented in the making and unmaking of holy places in Muslim lands.

Contributors: David N. Edwards, Claus-Peter Haase, Beatrice Hendrich, Sara Kuehn, Zacharie Mochtari de Pierrepont, Sara Mondini, Harry Munt, Luca Patrizi, George Quinn, Eric Ross, Ruggero Vimercati Sanseverino, Ethel Sara Wolper.
Brill Research Perspectives in Religion and the Arts presents extended reference articles on topics within the comprehensive field of world religions and the arts, from the traditional fine arts to newer fields of visual culture and material culture. References will be hyperlinked to original source materials when possible, offering both scholars and students the opportunity to stay current with the literature or to begin their research. Written as a single-author monograph with accompanying critical bibliography, each 50 to 100 page article provides an overview of the specific topic, its history within the larger discipline of religion and the arts, recent innovations in scholarship, critical commentary, and the unique analysis of the author's perspectives.
Volume Editors: and
Premodern architecture and built environments were fluid spaces whose configurations and meanings were constantly adapting and changing. The production of transitory meaning transpired whenever a body or object moved through these dynamic spaces. Whether spanning the short duration of a procession or the centuries of a building’s longue durée, a body or object in motion created in-the-moment narratives that unfolded through time and space. The authors in this volume forge new approaches to architectural studies by focusing on the interaction between monuments, artworks, and their viewers at different points in space and time.

Contributors are Christopher A. Born, Elizabeth Carson Pastan, Nicole Corrigan, Gillian B. Elliott, Barbara Franzé, Anne Heath, Philip Jacks, Divya Kumar-Dumas, Brigitte Kurmann-Schwarz, Ashley J. Laverock, Susan Leibacher Ward, Elodie Leschot, Meghan Mattsson McGinnis, Michael Sizer, Kelly Thor, and Laura J. Whatley.
Volume Editors: and
This volume unites a team of distinguished scholars from France, Germany, Italy, the UK, and the USA to celebrate Rosalind B. Brooke’s immense contribution to Franciscan studies over the last 60 years. It is divided into four sections, beginning with an appraisal of Dr Brooke’s influence upon Franciscan studies. The second section contains a series of historical studies and expressions of the Franciscan spirit. Hagiographical studies occupy the third section, reflecting the friars’ ministry and the thirst for the renewal of the Franciscan vision. The fourth part explores the art and iconographical images of St. Francis and his friars. These innovative studies reflect new insights into and interpretations of Franciscan life in the Middle Ages.

Contributors are (n order of appearance) Michael W. Blastic, O.F.M., Maria Pia Alberzoni, Bert Roest, Michael F. Cusato, O.F.M., Jens Röhrkasten, David Luscombe, Luigi Pellegrini. Peter Murray Jones, Maria Teresa Dolso, Michael J.P. Robson, André Vauchez, David Burr, William R. Cook, Nigel Morgan, and Kathleen Giles Arthur.
Antique Jewish art visualized the idea that the essence of God is beyond the world of forms. In the Bible, the Israelites were commanded to build sanctuaries without cult statues. Following the destruction of the Second Temple, Jews turned to literary and visual aids to fill the void. In this accessible survey, Shulamit Laderman traces the visualizations of the Tabernacle implements, including the seven-branch menorah, the Torah ark, the shofar, the four species, and other motifs associated with the Hebrew Bible and the Jewish calendar. These motifs evolved into iconographic symbols visualized in a range of media, including coins, funerary art, and synagogue decorations in both Israel and the Diaspora. Particular attention is given to important discoveries such as the frescoes of the third-century CE synagogue in Dura-Europos, mosaic floors in synagogues in Galilee, and architectural and carved motifs that decorated burial places.
Imagination in Renaissance Art and Theory from Botticelli to Michelangelo
Did the Florentine philosopher Marsilio Ficino (1433-99) influence the art of his time? Art historians have been fiercely debating this question for decades. This book starts with Ficino’s views on the imagination as a faculty of the soul, and shows how these ideas were part of a long philosophical tradition and inspired fresh insights. This approach, combined with little known historical material, offers a new understanding of whether, how and why Ficino’s Platonic conceptions of the imagination may have been received in the art of the Italian Renaissance. The discussion explores Ficino’s possible influence on the work of Botticelli and Michelangelo, and examines the appropriation of Ficino’s ideas by early modern art theorists.
Papers in Honour of Elizabeth Coatsworth
Volume Editors: and
A monastic artist with an unusual enthusiasm of male buttocks and genitalia; a nun bringing her spinning equipment from her home in the south to her new convent in the north; the riddle of a carved archer bearing a book instead of arrows; a bishop’s ring hiding in its design symbols of the essential aspects of the Christian faith: these are some of the secrets of early medieval personal and public worship uncovered in this book.
In tribute to a scholar who is herself a polymath of early medieval studies, these chapters explore approaches which have particularly engaged her: stone sculpture; text; textiles; manuscript art; metalwork; and archaeology. With a brief foreword by Professor Dame Rosemary Cramp.

Contributors are Richard N. Bailey, Michelle P. Brown, Peter Furniss, Jane Hawkes, David A. Hinton, Maren Clegg Hyer, Catherine E. Karkov, Alexandra Lester-Makin, Christina Lee, Donncha MacGabhann, Éamonn Ó Carragáin, Gale R. Owen-Crocker, Frances Pritchard, and Penelope Walton Rogers.
Zoutleeuw's Church of Saint Leonard and Religious Material Culture in the Low Countries (c. 1450-1620)
The Matter of Piety provides the first in-depth study of Zoutleeuw’s exceptionally well-preserved pilgrimage church in a comparative perspective, and revaluates religious art and material culture in Netherlandish piety from the late Middle Ages through the crisis of iconoclasm and the Reformation to Catholic restoration. Analyzing the changing functions, outlooks, and meanings of devotional objects – monumental sacrament houses, cult statues and altarpieces, and small votive offerings or relics – Ruben Suykerbuyk revises dominant narratives about Catholic culture and patronage in the Low Countries. Rather than being a paralyzing force, the Reformation incited engaged counterinitiatives, and the vitality of late medieval devotion served as the fertile ground from which the Counter-Reformation organically grew under Protestant impulses.
Author:
Approaching the prison as a creative environment and imprisoned officials as creative subjects in Ming China (1368-1644), Ying Zhang introduces important themes at the intersection of premodern Chinese religion, poetry, and visual and material culture. The Ming is known for its extraordinary cultural and economic accomplishments in the increasingly globalized early modern world. For scholars of Chinese religion and art, this era crystallizes the essential and enduring characteristics in these two spheres. Drawing on scholarship on Chinese philosophy, religion, aesthetics, poetry, music, and visual and material culture, Zhang illustrates how the prisoners understood their environment as creative and engaged it creatively. She then offers a literature survey on the characteristics of premodern Chinese religion and art that helps situate the questions of “creative environment” and “creative subject” within multiple fields of scholarship.
Sacred Skin offers the first systematic evaluation of the dissemination and development of the cult of St. Bartholomew in Spain. Exploring the paradoxes of hagiographic representation and their ambivalent effect on the observer, the book focuses on literary and visual testimonies produced from the emergence of a distinctive vernacular voice through to the formalization of Bartholomew’s saintly identity and his transformation into a key expression of Iberian consciousness. Drawing on and extending advances in cultural criticism, particularly theories of selfhood and the complex ontology of the human body, its five chapters probe the evolution of hagiographic conventions, demonstrating how flaying poses a unique challenge to our understanding of the nature and meaning of identity.

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