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Greek, Sogdian and Arabic Documents and Manuscripts from the Islamicate World and Beyond
Volume Editors: and
Documents open up another an approach complementary to the overwhelming richness of literary tradition as preserved in manuscripts. This volume combines studies on Greek, Sogdian and Arabic documents (letters, legal agreements, and amulets) with studies on Arabic and Judeo-Arabic manuscripts (poetry, science and divination).
Mirzā ʿAli-Qoli Khoʾi is the unsurpassed master of the art of illustration in Persian lithographed books of the Qajar period, both in terms of quality and quantity of production. In the decade of documented activity, 1263–72/1846–55, the artist produced more than 2,300 single images in about 70 books, plus hundreds of minutely executed small images on the margins of several books and numerous illuminated chapter headings. Prepared by Ulrich Marzolph together with Roxana Zenhari, the present publication is a comprehensive assessment of the artist’s work and the first ever detailed discussion of an Iranian artist of the Qajar period. In addition, the book also serves as an introduction to Persian and Islamic art.
Mirzā ʿAli-Qoli Khoʾi is the unsurpassed master of the art of illustration in Persian lithographed books of the Qajar period, both in terms of quality and quantity of production. In the decade of documented activity, 1263–72/1846–55, the artist produced more than 2,300 single images in about 70 books, plus hundreds of minutely executed small images on the margins of several books and numerous illuminated chapter headings. Prepared by Ulrich Marzolph together with Roxana Zenhari, the present publication is a comprehensive assessment of the artist’s work and the first ever detailed discussion of an Iranian artist of the Qajar period. In addition, the book also serves as an introduction to Persian and Islamic art.
Mirzā ʿAli-Qoli Khoʾi is the unsurpassed master of the art of illustration in Persian lithographed books of the Qajar period, both in terms of quality and quantity of production. In the decade of documented activity, 1263–72/1846–55, the artist produced more than 2,300 single images in about 70 books, plus hundreds of minutely executed small images on the margins of several books and numerous illuminated chapter headings. Prepared by Ulrich Marzolph together with Roxana Zenhari, the present publication is a comprehensive assessment of the artist’s work and the first ever detailed discussion of an Iranian artist of the Qajar period. In addition, the book also serves as an introduction to Persian and Islamic art.
Kalīla wa-Dimna is one of the best-known texts of medieval Arabic literature and counts among the most illustrated works in the Islamic world. The extent of the corpus and its journey through the ages make it the ideal material for a reflection on the evolution of iconography in Islamic art. The studies gathered in this volume edited by Eloïse Brac de la Perrière, Aïda El Khiari and Annie Vernay-Nouri, showcase a wide diversity of approaches that convincingly crosses textual investigation, codicology, iconographical study, and physico-chemical analyses. They explore new tracks, either by devoting themselves to the examination of unknown or rarely studied manuscripts, or by proposing innovative readings of this extremely rich work that is Kalīla wa-Dimna.

Kalīla wa-Dimna est l'un des textes les plus célèbres de la littérature arabe médiévale et compte parmi les œuvres les plus illustrées du monde islamique. L'étendue du corpus et son parcours à travers les âges en font un extraordinaire matériau pour mener une réflexion sur l’image dans l’histoire des arts islamiques. Les études rassemblées dans ce volume dirigé par Eloïse Brac de la Perrière, Aïda El Khiari et Annie Vernay-Nouri, mettent en œuvre une grande diversité d'approches croisant investigation textuelle, codicologique, iconographique et analyses physico-chimiques. Elles explorent toutes des pistes nouvelles, soit en se consacrant à l'examen de manuscrits inédits ou très rarement étudiés, soit en proposant des lectures innovantes de cette œuvre extrêmement riche qu’est Kalīla wa-Dimna.

Contributors: Eloïse Brac de la Perrière, Nathalie Buisson, Mounia Chekhab-Abudaya, Frantz Chaigne, Anna Contadini, Jean-Charles Coulon, Françoise Cuisance, Aïda El Khiari, Rajana Fatima Amalarajah, Béatrice Gruendler, Mika Natif, Bernard O’Kane, Hoa Perriguey, Yves Porter, Francis Richard, Valérie Saurel, Christine Van Ruymbeke, Annie Vernay-Nouri.

The volume is co-published by Brill, Leiden, and the Bibliothèque nationale de France.
An Iconological Analysis of the Relationships between Art, Science and Power
In Early Modern Thesis Prints in the Southern Netherlands, Gwendoline de Mûelenaere offers an account of the practice of producing illustrated thesis prints in the seventeenth-century Southern Low Countries. She argues that the evolution of the thesis print genre gave rise to the creation of a specific visual language combining efficiently various figurative registers of a historical and symbolic nature. The book offers a reflection on the representation of knowledge and its public recognition in the context of academic defenses.

Early Modern Thesis Prints makes a timely contribution to our understanding of early modern print culture and more specifically to the expanding field of study concerned with the role of visual materials in early modern thought.
In the early modern Iberian book world, as in the European book world more broadly, most works issuing from the presses contained some form of ornamentation. The nineteen contributions presented here cast light on these visual elements—on the production and ownership of printers’ materials, and on the frequency with which these materials were exchanged and shared. A third of all items printed in the early modern Iberian world carried no imprint at all; for these items, woodblocks and engravings can assist scholars seeking to identify their place of origin or their date of publication. As importantly, decoration and illustration in early print can also reveal much about the history of the graphic arts and evolving forms of cultural representation.
This volume celebrates and extends the extraordinary and transformative work of Ian Doyle on medieval manuscripts and their legacies. Eighteen original contributions by eminent international scholars of manuscript studies and history of the book present new research on textual issues, manuscript preservation and circulation, manuscripts and print, and the afterlives of manuscripts. Essays adopt the multi-faceted and nuanced approaches to manuscript studies and history of the book characteristic of Ian Doyle’s work, taking up topics to which his research has drawn attention, extending his studies of particular manuscripts, scribes and networks, and exploring his remarkable contributions to the field.

Contributors are: Ralph Hanna, Susan Powell, Julia Boffey, David Rundle, James Willoughby, Carol Meale, Martha Driver, William Marx, Veronica O'Mara, Richard Gameson, Kathleen Scott, Margaret Connolly, Richard Beadle, A. S. G. Edwards, Elizabeth Rainey, Pamela Robinson, Toshi Takamiya, Linne Mooney, and Derek Pearsall.
Volume Editors: , , and
Bringing together the work of scholars from disparate fields of enquiry, this volume provides a timely and stimulating exploration of the themes of transmission and translation, charting developments, adaptations and exchanges – textual, visual, material and conceptual – that reverberated across the medieval world, within wide-ranging temporal and geographical contexts. Such transactions generated a multiplicity of fusions expressed in diverse and often startling ways – architecturally, textually and through peoples’ lived experiences – that informed attitudes of selfhood and ‘otherness’, senses of belonging and ownership, and concepts of regionality, that have been further embraced in modern and contemporary arenas of political and cultural discourse.
Contributors are Tarren Andrews, Edel Bhreathnach, Cher Casey, Katherine Cross, Amanda Doviak, Elisa Foster, Matthias Friedrich, Jane Hawkes, Megan Henvey, Aideen Ireland, Alison Killilea, Ross McIntire, Lesley Milner, John Mitchell, Nino Simonishvili, and Rachael Vause.
In the early modern period, images of revolts and violence became increasingly important tools to legitimize or contest political structures. This volume offers the first in-depth analysis of how early modern people produced and consumed violent imagery, and assesses its role in memory practices, political mobilization, and the negotiation of cruelty and justice.

Critically evaluating the traditional focus on Western European imagery, the case studies in this book draw on evidence from Russia, China, Hungary, Portugal, Germany, North America, and other regions. The contributors highlight the distinctions among visual cultures of violence, as well as their entanglements in networks of intensive transregional communication, early globalization, and European colonization.

Contributors: Monika Barget, David de Boer, Nóra G. Etényi, Fabian Fechner, Joana Fraga, Malte Griesse, Alain Hugon, Gleb Kazakov, Nancy Kollmann, Ya-Chen Ma, Galina Tirnanić, and Ramon Voges.