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Often considered as the first phenomenon of mass media in history, the use of books and prints by Protestants has been widely studied and has generated a rich and plentiful bibliography. In contrast, the production and use of these supports by the partisans of the Counter-Reformation have not received the attention they deserve, especially in the context of the Low Countries.

The twelve contributors provide new perspectives on the efficacy of the handpress book industry to support the Catholic strategy of the Spanish Low Countries and underlines the mutually beneficial relationship between proponents of the Counter-Reformation and the typographic world. An important contribution to our understanding of the sociocultural and socioeconomic background of the Catholic Netherlands.
Written by the poet-painter Karel van Mander, who finished it in June 1603, the Grondt der edel, vry schilderconst (Foundation of the Noble, Free Art of Painting) was the first systematic treatise on schilderconst (the art of painting / picturing) to be published in Dutch (Haarlem: Paschier van Wes[t]busch, 1604). This English-language edition of the Grondt, accompanied by an introductory monograph and a full critical apparatus, provides unprecedented access to Van Mander’s crucially important art treatise. The book sheds light on key terms and critical categories such as schilder, manier, uyt zijn selven doen, welstandt, leven and gheest, and wel schilderen, and both exemplifies and explicates the author’s distinctive views on the complementary forms and functions of history and landscape.
Music, Images, and Drama to Promote the Reformation
Martin Luther was the architect and engineer of the Protestant Reformation, which transformed Germany five hundred years ago. In Martin Luther and the Arts, Andreas Loewe and Katherine Firth elucidate Luther’s theory and practice, demonstrating the breadth, flexibility and rigour of Luther’s use of the arts to reach audiences and convince them of his Reformation message using a range of strategies, including music, images and drama alongside sermons, polemical tracts, and his new translation of the Bible into German.

Extensively based on German and English sources, including often neglected aspects of Luther’s own writings, Loewe and Firth offer a valuable survey for theologians, historians, art historians, musicologists and literary studies scholars interested in interdisciplinary comparisons of Luther’s work across the arts.
Author:
In Tombs in Early Modern Rome (1400–1600), Jan L. de Jong reveals how funerary monuments, far from simply marking a grave, offered an image of the deceased that was carefully crafted to generate a laudable memory and prompt meditative reflections on life, death, and the hereafter. This leads to such questions as: which image of themselves did cardinals create when they commissioned their own tomb monuments? Why were most popes buried in a grandiose tomb monument that they claimed they did not want? Which memory of their mother did children create, and what do tombs for children tell about mothers? Were certain couples buried together so as to demonstrate their eternal love, expecting an afterlife in each other’s company?
The Performance of Forgery in Late Medieval and Early Modern Culture
Faking It! collects eleven chapters which explore the question of forgery from different disciplinary angles: literary historical and art historical contributions share space with discussions of jewels, architecture and coinage. The various case studies take as their focus developments in Renaissance Italy and Early Modern England as well as in France, Germany, Malta, Denmark, Sweden, Iceland, Russia and Australia. While each chapter contributes to a better understanding of the local context of cultural production, together they suggest new answers to how we can understand forgery. The concept of performance allows us to see beyond normative approaches and gain insight into some of the ambiguities concerning the nature of forgery.

Contributors include: Brian Boeck, Federica Boldrini, Patricia Pires Boulhosa, Laurent Curelly, Helen Hughes, Jacqueline Hylkema, Philip Lavender, Lorenzo Paoli, Ingrid D. Rowland, Camilla Russo, and Ksenija Tschetschik-Hammerl.
Sources, Iconography and Science
Leonardo’s Fables explores the compositional methods and sources of Leonardo’s fables and their relationship to illustrations and scientific studies. By concentrating on the chaotic character of Leonardo’s textual and visual annotations, the author gradually discloses the artist’s creative thinking that uses the page as a space for experimentation.

Fables allow Leonardo to tie together his technical and artistic skills, empirical observation, and experience to reveal the interactive forces at the basis of physical phenomena and the tensions between painting and humanistic culture. This study reevaluates Leonardo’s fables as part of a literary, aesthetic, and scientific project aimed at the investigation of Nature.
What does 'performance' mean in Christian culture? How is it connected to rituals, dramatic and visual arts, and the written word? Performing the Sacred: Christian Representation and the Arts explores both the meaning of re-presentation and the role of performance within the Christian tradition between arts and drama. The essays in this book demonstrate that the idea of performance was central to Christian theology and that—from the Middle Ages to the Early Modern era—it became a device through which people saw, prayed, preached, wrote, imagined, officiated rites, celebrated cults, and practiced devotions. Seen that performance is a habitus within Christianity, performing the sacred does not just mean representing it, but rather enacting it in a tangible, visible and involved way.
Volume Editors: and
In premodern times, death was a more visible phenomenon than now owing to the ways in which dying and the subsequent phases of burial, bereavement, and remembrance were collectively experienced and publicly performed, and commemorated in objects and monuments. This volume of the Netherlands Yearbook for History of Art offers a diverse collection of essays on works of art, permanent or ephemeral, related to dying and cultural experiences of death, interment, and memorialisation in the Low Countries and its diaspora, from the late Middle Ages to the eighteenth century. Topics range from the tomb of Philip the Bold to the funeral of Rembrandt and the death of enslaved bodies deprived of representation.