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Often considered as the first phenomenon of mass media in history, the use of books and prints by Protestants has been widely studied and has generated a rich and plentiful bibliography. In contrast, the production and use of these supports by the partisans of the Counter-Reformation have not received the attention they deserve, especially in the context of the Low Countries.

The twelve contributors provide new perspectives on the efficacy of the handpress book industry to support the Catholic strategy of the Spanish Low Countries and underlines the mutually beneficial relationship between proponents of the Counter-Reformation and the typographic world. An important contribution to our understanding of the sociocultural and socioeconomic background of the Catholic Netherlands.
Series Editor:
This book series takes an interdisciplinary approach, examining the literature of modernity through consideration of its diverse phenomena and contexts.
While the Early Modern Era was marked in cultural-historical terms by the Renaissance, economically by the Industrial Revolution and politically by the French Revolution as well as nationalism, a first high point in modern literature was achieved by insights drawn from the natural and human sciences, foremost the fields of psychoanalysis, the quantum hypothesis, and the theory of relativity. A necessary condition for the interdisciplinary approach, therefore, in addition to the consideration of socio-cultural implications, is engagement with the history of thought, which makes the development of the Modern Era comprehensible.
This premise provides the basis for the examination of the numerous phenomena of modernity through the lens of literary texts, stemming from all applicable national literatures.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to the publisher at BRILL, Masja Horn.
Volume Editors: and
This volume unites a team of distinguished scholars from France, Germany, Italy, the UK, and the USA to celebrate Rosalind B. Brooke’s immense contribution to Franciscan studies over the last 60 years. It is divided into four sections, beginning with an appraisal of Dr Brooke’s influence upon Franciscan studies. The second section contains a series of historical studies and expressions of the Franciscan spirit. Hagiographical studies occupy the third section, reflecting the friars’ ministry and the thirst for the renewal of the Franciscan vision. The fourth part explores the art and iconographical images of St. Francis and his friars. These innovative studies reflect new insights into and interpretations of Franciscan life in the Middle Ages.

Contributors are (n order of appearance) Michael W. Blastic, O.F.M., Maria Pia Alberzoni, Bert Roest, Michael F. Cusato, O.F.M., Jens Röhrkasten, David Luscombe, Luigi Pellegrini. Peter Murray Jones, Maria Teresa Dolso, Michael J.P. Robson, André Vauchez, David Burr, William R. Cook, Nigel Morgan, and Kathleen Giles Arthur.
Past and Present in the Eighteenth Century
Editors: and
The Long Quarrel: Past and Present in the Eighteenth Century examines how the intellectual clashes emerging from the Quarrel of the Ancients and the Moderns continued to reverberate until the end of the eighteenth century. This extended Quarrel was not just about the value of ancient and modern, but about historical thought in a broader sense. The tension between ancient and modern expanded into a more general tension between past and present, which were no longer seen as essentially similar, but as different in nature. Thus, a new kind of historical consciousness came into being in the Long Quarrel of the eighteenth century, which also gave rise to new ideas about knowledge, art, literature and politics.

Contributors are: Jacques Bos, Anna Cullhed, Håkon Evju, Vera Faßhauer, Andrew Jainchill, Anton M. Matytsin, Iain McDaniel, Larry F. Norman, David D. Reitsam, Jan Rotmans, Friederike Voßkamp, and Christine Zabel.
Imagination in Renaissance Art and Theory from Botticelli to Michelangelo
Did the Florentine philosopher Marsilio Ficino (1433-99) influence the art of his time? Art historians have been fiercely debating this question for decades. This book starts with Ficino’s views on the imagination as a faculty of the soul, and shows how these ideas were part of a long philosophical tradition and inspired fresh insights. This approach, combined with little known historical material, offers a new understanding of whether, how and why Ficino’s Platonic conceptions of the imagination may have been received in the art of the Italian Renaissance. The discussion explores Ficino’s possible influence on the work of Botticelli and Michelangelo, and examines the appropriation of Ficino’s ideas by early modern art theorists.
Knowledge Production and Transfiguration from the Renaissance to Today
This volume addresses the interdependencies between visual technologies and epistemology with regard to our perception of the medical body. It explores the relationships between the imagination, the body, and concrete forms of visual representations: Ranging from the Renaissance paradigm of anatomy, to Foucault’s “birth of the clinic” and the institutionalised construction of a “medical gaze”; from “visual” archives of madness, psychiatric art collections, the politicisation and economisation of the body, to the post-human in mass media representations.
Contributions to this volume investigate medical bodies as historical, technological, and political constructs, constituted where knowledge formation and visual cultures intersect.

Contributors are: Axel Fliethmann, Michael Hau, Birgit Lang, Carolyn Lau, Heikki Lempa, stef lenk, Joanna Madloch, Barry Murnane, Jill Redner, Claudia Stein, Elizabeth Stephens, Corinna Wagner, and Christiane Weller.
Jean-Baptiste Du Bos’ Critical Reflections on Poetry and Painting, first published in French in 1719, is one of the seminal works of modern aesthetics. Du Bos rejected the seventeenth-century view that works of art are assessed by reason. Instead, he believed, audience members have sentiments in response to artworks. Their sentiments are fainter versions of those they would feel in response to actually seeing what the work of art imitates. Du Bos was influenced by John Locke’s empiricism and, in turn, had a major impact on virtually every major eighteenth-century contributor to philosophy of art, including Voltaire, Montesquieu, Diderot, Rousseau, Herder, Lessing, Mendelssohn, Kames, Gerard, and Hume. This is the first modern, annotated and scholarly edition of the Critical Reflections in any language.
A Companion to Late Medieval and Early Modern Siena presents chapters by prominent scholars on the powerful commune that birthed a pope, sheltered saints, built banking institutions that have thrived for nearly 1000 years, and nurtured vibrant communities of artists and intellectuals. This multi-disciplinary book, edited by Santa Casciani and Heather Richardson Hayton, redresses scholarly imbalances of the past by introducing early period Siena to a wider audience. Focusing mostly on the 12th to 16th centuries, each chapter explores how the Sienese crafted a distinctive civic identity that remains intact still. Modern readers will find Siena’s responses to plague, political factionalism, and aggression from powerful neighbours particularly relevant.

Contributors are: Mario Ascheri, Saverio Luigi Battente, Elena Brizio, Santa Casciani, Konrad Eisenbichler, Bradley Franco, Fabrizio Nevola, Anna Peterson, Colleen Reardon, Sheri Shaneyfelt, Jane Tylus, Andrea Beth Wenz, Demetrio Yocum.
Author:
In Pi (π) in Nature, Art, and Culture Marcel Danesi revisits the importance of π as a pattern in the structure of reality, fitting in with the Pythagorean view of Order. Pi has cropped up in formulas that describe natural and physical structures which, on the surface, seem to have nothing to do with a circle, but might harbor the archetype of circularity as a principle.

Through π, this book thus revisits the implicit ancient Greek view that geometry was a 'hermeneutic science,' a discipline aiming to investigate the connectivity among numbers, shapes, and natural phenomena. It also examines its manifestations in aesthetic, symbolic and cultural structures, which point to an abiding fascination with the circle as an unconscious archetype. Hermeneutic geometry is ultimately about the exploration of the meanings of geometric-mathematical notions to science and human life.
On the Hostility to Handicraft, Aesthetic Labour and the Politics of Work in Art
Author:
This book provides a new history of the changing relationship between art, craft and industry focusing on the transition from workshop to studio, apprentice to pupil, guild to gallery and artisan to artist. Responding to the question whether the artist is a relic of the feudal mode of production or is a commodity producer corresponding to the capitalist mode of cultural production, this inquiry reveals, instead, that the history of the formation of art as distinct from handicraft, commerce and industry can be traced back to the dissolution of the dual system of guild and court. This history needs to be revisited in order to rethink the categories of aesthetic labour, attractive labour, alienated labour, nonalienated labour and unwaged labour that shape the modern and contemporary politics of work in art.