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Series Editor:
This peer reviewed book series focuses on scholarly publications (monographs, edited volumes, catalogues) on visual arts in the Netherlands up to 1900.
The Oud Holland Book Series is closely related to the journal Oud Holland, Journal for Art of the Low Countries, the oldest surviving art historical journal in the world. The book series is a platform for larger studies on topics relevant for the journal. Books are published in English.

Manuscripts can be submitted for review to the publisher, attention of Liesbeth Hugenholtz (hugenholtz@brill.com).

Author:
Germany is considered a lauded land of music: outstanding composers, celebrated performers and famous orchestras exert great international appeal. Since the 19th century, the foundation of this reputation has been the broad mass of musicians who sat in orchestra pits, played in ensembles for dances or provided the musical background in silent movie theatres. Martin Rempe traces their lives and working worlds, including their struggle for economic improvement and societal recognition. His detailed portrait of the profession ‘from below’ sheds new light on German musical life in the modern era.
Volume Editors: and
How did exiled musicians from Germany and Austria, who reached safety at Kitchener Camp in Britain, find themselves in an Australian internment camp in New South Wales in 1940? What were the institutions that helped Jewish refugee musicians survive in wartime Shanghai? What happened to Austrian musicians who were trapped in the Netherlands after the German occupation?
These and other questions, and the larger stories they refer to, form the compelling content of this book. Other topics include the struggle of the Vienna operetta composers Granichstaedten and Katscher in USA, the relationship of émigré composer Berthold Goldschmidt to his native Hamburg and the reception of his ‘exile opera’ Beatrice Cenci. Studies of Mischa Spoliansky’s music for the movie Mr. Emmanuel(1944) and Franz Reizenstein’s radio opera Anna Kraus form part of the fourteen essays on exile musical history in Britain, Europe, USA, Australia and the Far East, based on cutting edge archival research and interviews by leading scholars.
Author:
This book depicts the long rich life and wide ranging work of Count Athanasius Raczyński (1788–1874). By exploring his complex personality, his processes of thought and his accomplishments, it reveals a man at once a wealthy aristocrat, a Pole in the Prussian diplomatic service, an active participant in and perceptive observer and critical commentator on political life, a connoisseur and art collector of European renown, and the author of ground breaking studies on German and Portuguese art – in short a distinguished and fascinating nineteenth century figure.
Philanthropy, the Arts, and the State in Leipzig (1750-1918)
This book offers a novel approach to the history of high culture and new perspectives on the history of civil society in provincial Germany. It makes the concept of place a central means for understanding how art culture was defined, consumed, and, importantly, distributed over the course of the long nineteenth century. It shows how “temples of culture” come to be built where they were built. It further demonstrates who participated in their planning, funding, construction, and ultimate evolution into public institutions, highlighting underexamined links between the history of art culture and that of urban history and civil society.
Past and Present in the Eighteenth Century
Editors: and
The Long Quarrel: Past and Present in the Eighteenth Century examines how the intellectual clashes emerging from the Quarrel of the Ancients and the Moderns continued to reverberate until the end of the eighteenth century. This extended Quarrel was not just about the value of ancient and modern, but about historical thought in a broader sense. The tension between ancient and modern expanded into a more general tension between past and present, which were no longer seen as essentially similar, but as different in nature. Thus, a new kind of historical consciousness came into being in the Long Quarrel of the eighteenth century, which also gave rise to new ideas about knowledge, art, literature and politics.

Contributors are: Jacques Bos, Anna Cullhed, Håkon Evju, Vera Faßhauer, Andrew Jainchill, Anton M. Matytsin, Iain McDaniel, Larry F. Norman, David D. Reitsam, Jan Rotmans, Friederike Voßkamp, and Christine Zabel.
Nordic Environmental Humanities and the Emotional Turn
The volume Landscapes of Affect and Emotion maps out the current approaches on emotion and affect in environmental humanities and interdisciplinary landscape studies. It discusses the contemporary emotional turn in humanities and its relation to space, place and landscape. Emotions and affects are addressed from three main angles: representation and symbolic landscape, place experience and lifeworlds, and landscape as an embodied set of practices. These are studied in terms of the changing human-nature relationship, focusing on politicisations and contestations of landscape as well as boundaries and hybridity between culture and nature.
Author:
Foreign Currency Volatility and the Market for French Modernist Art examines how the collapse of the French franc in the decades following the First World War activated powerful ‘push’ and ‘pull’ economic forces that compelled French art collectors to monetise their collections while simultaneously elevating the purchasing power of international art collectors. These factors are shown to have played a significant, and previously under-recognised role, in the large-scale translocation of French modernist art that radically accelerated its commercial and critical reception across the globe and positioned it at the apex of the newly established hierarchy of modern art.
A sense of loss is a driving force in most nationalist movements: territorial loss, the loss of traditions, language, national virtues or of a Golden Age. But which emotions charged the construction of loss and how did they change over time? To what objects and bodies did emotions stick? How was the production of loss gendered? Which figures of loss predated nationalist ideology and enabled loss within nationalist discourse? 13 scholars from different backgrounds answer these questions by exploring nationalist discourses during the long nineteenth century in the Baltic Sea region through political writings, lectures, novels, letters, paintings, and diaries.

Contributors are: Eve Annuk, Jenny Bergenmar, Anna Bohlin, Jens Grandell, Heidi Grönstrand, Maciej Janowski, Jules Kielmann, Tiina Kinnunen, Kristina Malmio, Peter Nørgaard Larsen, Martin Olin, Jens Eike Schnall, and Bjarne Thorup Thomsen.