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The Art and Culture of the Oratorians of Saint Philip Neri
There is scant research on the art produced under the Congregation of the Oratory of Saint Philip Neri, with the exception of a couple of general books focused primarily on major Oratorian art pieces. Therefore, this book of essays aims to discuss the art and culture produced by or associated with the Oratorians by providing a broad overview focused especially on rarely investigated issues. The authors focus on this very important artistic production, commonly forgotten when compared with other religious productions of art, by covering geographical areas spanning from Sri Lanka to Mexico, including Italy, Spain, the United Kingdom, India and Brazil.
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The story of the mitre began during the 11th-century church reform movements and was, surprisingly, inspired by a popular pastime. After a thousand years of bare heads, the Church finally had an official hat, signaling newly-structured internal dynamics, an increase in power and influence in society, and greater parity with secular leaders.
A Historical-Theological Study of the Jesuit Mission to China, 1552–1773
This book integrates history, theology, and art and analyzes the Jesuits’ cross-cultural mission in late imperial China. Readers will find a rich collection of resources from historical sites, museums, manuscripts, and archival materials, including previous unpublished works of art. The production and circulation of art from different historical periods and categories show the artistic, theological, and missional values of Christian art. It highlights European Jesuits, Asian Christians, transnationalism, and gives voice to Chinese Christian women and their patronage of art in the seventeenth century. It offers a rare systematic study of the relation between art and mission history.
The Discalced Carmelites in Italy and Their Mission to Persia and the East Indies
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Teresa of Ávila's cult was dramatically disseminated in previously unknown celebrations honoring her beatification (1614) and canonization (1622) in Italy and Portuguese Asia, the purview of her Discalced Carmelite Order's Italian Congregation. Reconstructions and analyses of the festivities in Genoa, Rome, Naples, Hormuz, and Goa center on the presentation of Teresa's gender, deeds, virtues, and miracles. The geopolitical roles played by religious, secular, and family networks in particularizing and propagating Teresa's universal cult are emphasized. The desired goal of converting Muslims and Hindus is addressed in light of attitudes toward ethnic and religious diversity shared by lay and ecclesiastical authorities.
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The early 16th-century baptismal font canopy of the church of St. Peter Mancroft, Norwich, is one of only three such structures to survive anywhere in the British Isles. This study, inspired by the recent rediscovery of four attributable panels at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, offers a trans-temporal account of the canopy’s initial creation and subsequent use, mutilation, and modification. Written by a team of scholars in art/architectural history, art conservation, heritage documentation, literary studies, and museum curation, it explores the installation’s multiple artistic, ritual, and cultural contexts, from late medieval and early modern Europe to modern-day North America. Contributors are Benjamin Baaske, Sarah Blick, Kate Duffy, Brent R. Fortenberry, Amy Gillette, Jack Hinton, Lesley Milner, Peggy Olley, Ellen K. Rentz, Behrooz Salimnejad, Zachary Stewart, Achim Timmermann, Charles Tracy, Kim Woods, and Lucy Wrapson.
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Whereas entire libraries discuss the religious and political history of the sixteenth century in Northern Europe, focused on the Reformation and the rise of nation-states, Larry Silver uniquely traces the dramatic, even traumatic changes of the Reformation era discernible in the visual arts, especially paintings and the new medium of prints. Among the subjects and themes he explores are the destruction of church images, witchcraft, reactions to new voyages of exploration, and issues of vision itself in an age when moral codes and the nature of sin and death were being re-examined.
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Exploring the nexus of music and religious education involves fundamental questions regarding music itself, its nature, its interpretation, and its importance in relation to both education and the religious practices into which it is integrated.
This cross-disciplinary volume of essays offers the first comprehensive set of studies to examine the role of music in educational and religious reform and the underlying notions of music in early modern Europe. It elucidates the context and manner in which music served as a means of religious teaching and learning during that time, thereby identifying the religio-cultural and intellectual foundations of early modern European musical phenomena and their significance for exploring the interplay of music and religious education today.
Often considered the advent of mass media, the use of books and prints by Protestants has been widely studied and has generated a rich and plentiful bibliography. In contrast, the production and use of the same media by the proponents of the Counter-Reformation have not received the attention they deserve, especially in the context of the Low Countries. The twelve chapters in this volume provide new perspectives on the efficacy of the handpress book industry to support the Catholic strategy in the Spanish Low Countries and underline the mutually beneficial relationship between the Counter-Reformation and the typographic world. This volume represents an important contribution to our understanding of the sociocultural and socioeconomic background of the Catholic Netherlands.
Music, Images, and Drama to Promote the Reformation
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