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Kalīla wa-Dimna is one of the best-known texts of medieval Arabic literature and counts among the most illustrated works in the Islamic world. The extent of the corpus and its journey through the ages make it the ideal material for a reflection on the evolution of iconography in Islamic art. The studies gathered in this volume edited by Eloïse Brac de la Perrière, Aïda El Khiari and Annie Vernay-Nouri, showcase a wide diversity of approaches that convincingly crosses textual investigation, codicology, iconographical study, and physico-chemical analyses. They explore new tracks, either by devoting themselves to the examination of unknown or rarely studied manuscripts, or by proposing innovative readings of this extremely rich work that is Kalīla wa-Dimna.

Kalīla wa-Dimna est l'un des textes les plus célèbres de la littérature arabe médiévale et compte parmi les œuvres les plus illustrées du monde islamique. L'étendue du corpus et son parcours à travers les âges en font un extraordinaire matériau pour mener une réflexion sur l’image dans l’histoire des arts islamiques. Les études rassemblées dans ce volume dirigé par Eloïse Brac de la Perrière, Aïda El Khiari et Annie Vernay-Nouri, mettent en œuvre une grande diversité d'approches croisant investigation textuelle, codicologique, iconographique et analyses physico-chimiques. Elles explorent toutes des pistes nouvelles, soit en se consacrant à l'examen de manuscrits inédits ou très rarement étudiés, soit en proposant des lectures innovantes de cette œuvre extrêmement riche qu’est Kalīla wa-Dimna.

Contributors: Eloïse Brac de la Perrière, Nathalie Buisson, Mounia Chekhab-Abudaya, Frantz Chaigne, Anna Contadini, Jean-Charles Coulon, Françoise Cuisance, Aïda El Khiari, Rajana Fatima Amalarajah, Béatrice Gruendler, Mika Natif, Bernard O’Kane, Hoa Perriguey, Yves Porter, Francis Richard, Valérie Saurel, Christine Van Ruymbeke, Annie Vernay-Nouri.

The volume is co-published by Brill, Leiden, and the Bibliothèque nationale de France.
Author:
This handbook aims mainly at an analytical documentation of all the known textual remnants and the preserved artifacts of Arabic shadow theatre, a long-lived, and still living, tradition — from the earliest sightings in the tenth century to the turn of the twentieth century. The book consists of three main parts and a cluster of appendixes. Part One presents a history of Arab shadow theatre through a survey of medieval and premodern accounts and modern scholarship on the subject. Part Two takes stock of primary sources (manuscripts), published studies, and the current knowledge of various aspects of Arabic shadow theatre: language, style, terminology, and performance. Part Three offers an inventory of all known Arabic shadow plays. The documentation is based on manuscripts (largely unpublished), printed texts (scripts, excerpts), academic studies (in Arabic and Western languages), journalist reportage, and shadow play artifacts from collections worldwide.
The Thousand and One Nights does not fall into a scholarly canon or into the category of popular literature. It takes its place within a middle literature that circulated widely in medieval times. The Nights gradually entered world literature through the great novels of the day and through music, cinema and other art forms. Material inspired by the Nights has continued to emerge from many different countries, periods, disciplines and languages, and the scope of the Nights has continued to widen, making the collection a universal work from every point of view. The essays in this volume scrutinize the expanse of sources for this monumental work of Arabic literature and follow the trajectory of the Nights’ texts, the creative, scholarly commentaries, artistic encounters and relations to science.

Contributors: Ibrahim Akel, Rasoul Aliakbari, Daniel Behar, Aboubakr Chraïbi, Anne E. Duggan, William Granara, Rafika Hammoudi, Dominique Jullien, Abdelfattah Kilito, Magdalena Kubarek, Michael James Lundell, Ulrich Marzolph, Adam Mestyan, Eyüp Özveren, Marina Paino, Daniela Potenza, Arafat Abdur Razzaque, Ahmed Saidy, Johannes Thomann and Ilaria Vitali.
The present volume consists of translated anecdotes, on musicological and socio-cultural topics, from al-Iṣbahānī’s Kitāb al-Aghānī al-Kabīr (The Grand Book of Songs) with annotations and commentaries. It deals with musical rhythmic and melodic modes, technical terms and treatises; music instruments; composition techniques and processes; education and oral/written transmissions; vocal and instrumental performances and their aesthetics; solo and ensemble music; change and its inevitability; musical and textual improvisations; ṭarab and the acute emotions of joy or grief; medieval dances; social status. Though extracts from The Grand Book of Songs have been translated in European languages since 1816, this work presents a much larger and more comprehensive scope that will benefit musicologists, medievalist and Middle Eastern scholars as well as the general reader.
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In Poet of Jordan, William Tamplin presents two decades’ worth of the political poetry of Muhammad Fanatil al-Hajaya, a Bedouin poet from Jordan and a public figure whose voice channels a popular strain of popular Arab political thought. Tamplin’s footnoted translations are supplemented with a biography, interviews, and pictures in order to contextualize the man behind the poetry.

The aesthetics and politics of vernacular Arabic poetry have long gone undervalued. By offering a close study of the life and work of Hajaya, Tamplin demonstrates the impact that one poet’s voice can have on the people and leaders of the contemporary Middle East.
William of Tyre's history of the Kingdom of Jerusalem has long been viewed as one of the most useful sources for the Crusades and the Latin East from the beginnings of the First Crusade to William's death shortly before Saladin's conquest of Jerusalem. However, this text was most popular during the medieval period in an Old French translation.
In The Old French of William of Tyre Philip Handyside identifies the differences between the Latin and French texts and analyses the translator motives for producing the translation and highlights significant changes that may provide a better understanding of the period in question. Handyside also argues for a complex manuscript tradition that developed across the medieval Mediterranean.
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The series offers a platform for studies in literature and the performing arts of the Muslim World at large, covering all periods (pre-modern to present day) and a wide variety of cultural traditions and languages (including, but not limited to, Arabic, Persian, Turkish, Urdu, and other Asian and African languages and practices). It draws scholars from various fields such as literature, theater, music and dance, folklore and epic, liturgy and rituals, cinema and media studies, and popular culture. It encourages and fosters comparative and interdisciplinary studies.

In addition to monographs, the series welcomes text editions and translations of significant primary texts, as well as thematic collections of articles.

The series has published an average of one title per year since 2014.