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Encounters across Arts, Sciences and Humanities
Experimental Practices seeks to develop science, art, and literature as truly experimental practices, and explores their interaction towards new forms of knowledge production.

The need to forge alliances between the humanities, arts, and sciences has increased in times of environmental, political, and technological crisis and transformation. Disciplinary hybrids, such as the environmental or medical humanities, and transdisciplinary endeavors in the fields of cultural studies, artistic research, and science and technology studies signal the urgency of a turn towards ecological and more-than-human approaches. These emergent practices and perspectives reshape modes of knowing and interacting in resonance with a broad array of worldly concerns, including decolonization, digitalization, and the reinvention of the social. In this context, Experimental Practices is a platform for creative forms of research at the intersections of the humanities, sciences, arts, and activism on issues that shape contemporary cultures and their future.

Taking “experimentation” as the practice, topic, and aim of the series, the editors welcome monographs or collected volumes on a specific concept or theme that contribute and enact a practice-based and theory-driven poetics of knowledge.

The series is committed to continue a fruitful collaboration with the international SLSA (Society for the Study of Literature, Science, and the Arts), including its independent European branch SLSAeu.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to the publisher at BRILL, Christa Stevens.
This interdisciplinary volume of essays explores how the notion of time varies across disciplines by examining variance as a defining feature of temporalities in cultural, creative, and scholarly contexts. Featuring a President’s Address by philosopher David Wood, it begins with critical reassessments of J.T. Fraser’s hierarchical theory of time through the lens of Anthropocene studies, philosophy, ecological theory, and ecological literature; proceeds to variant narratives in fiction, video games, film, and graphic novels; and concludes by measuring time’s variance with tools as different as incense clocks and computers, and by marking variance in music, film, and performance art.
Editors: and
Art and science are commonly considered to be two distinct expressions of human culture. This volume of the Netherlands Kunsthistorisch Jaarboek is devoted to the extremely rich and complex relationship between these two in the early modern Netherlands, a relationship which went much further than the use of linear perspective in painting. Both in theory and in everyday practice, the distinction between 'art' and 'science' was hard to sustain, and often proved to be not that relevant at all. Artists perfected the portrayal of human anatomy, natural historians reflected on the visual representation of previously unknown forms of life, and wealthy citizens possessed cabinets of curiosities in which naturalia and articificalia shared prominence. The case studies in this rich and challenging volume explore such topics as the influence of pictography, theories of vision and colour, the influence of Cartesian natural philosophy on art theory, and the allegorisation of science in Dutch frontispieces, amongst others.