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Thamyris seeks to initiate alternative forms of criticism by analysing the ways in which cultural and theoretical discourses intervene in the contemporary world. This criticism should pursue a re-politicizing and remobilizing of theoretical perspectives and cultural practices, preferably through case studies. Thamyris hopes to contribute to the productive interaction between art, activism, and theory. We understand cultural practices to include those of literary, visual, digital, and performance arts, but also social practices related to gender, sexuality, and ethnicity. In short, Thamyris aims at exploring the ways in which varying cultural practices, separately or in interaction, can be effective as agents of social and cultural change.
The series entitled Consciousness, Literature and the Arts is a scholarly line of books consisting of monographs (and thematic collections of articles), in the English language, dealing with a wide variety of areas, problems, and applications within the broad field of consciousness studies in relation to literature and the arts with all their sub-genres.

When Dorothy Hewett joked about needing a face-lift and sex-change to improve her standing, she drew attention to forces that shaped the production and reception of her drama. Drawing on production of her plays over four decades, and interviews with Hewett’s collaborators, this book reveals how cultural memories in theatre solidify and dissolve.
Viewing theatre production as a mode of remembrance, Beaglehole grapples with Hewett as a divisive figure who was ahead of a conservative Australia. Revisiting frequently produced plays, including chapters on The Man from Mukinupin and The Chapel Perilous, as well as rarely-produced works, including Nowhere and The Tatty Hollow Story, this book articulates the ongoing relevance of Hewett’s drama to the history of theatre in Australia.
Author:
Dreamwork for Dramatic Writing: Dreamwrighting for Stage and Screen teaches you how to use your dreams, content, form, and structure, to write surprisingly unique new drama for film and stage. It is an exciting departure from traditional linear, dramatic technique, and addresses both playwriting and screenwriting, as the profession is increasingly populated by writers who work in both stage and screen. Developed through 25 years of teaching award-winning playwrights in the University of Missouri’s Writing for Performance Program, and based upon the phenomenological research of renowned performance theorist Bert O. States, this book offers a foundational, step-by-step organic guide to non-traditional, non-linear technique that will help writers beat clichéd, tired dramatic writing and provides stimulating new exercises to transform their work.
Memory, Identity and the Haunted Imagination in Contemporary Literature and Art
How does the spectre appear in Icelandic literature and visual art created in the aftermath of the economic crash in Iceland in 2008? Why does it emerge at that specific point in time and what can it tell us about repressed collective memories in Iceland? The book explores how the crash becomes an implicit background setting in novels that address the silences and gaps of the family archive, and how crime fiction employs generic features of horror to explicitly tackle the ghosts residing in the lost homes of the financial crash. Spectral space is an apparent theme of cultural memories produced in times of crisis, and the book explores how this is made apparent in visual art of the period.
New Directions in International Theatre and Performance
Series Editor:
Published in association with the International Federation for Theatre Research (IFTR), this series is a platform for innovative scholarly work that takes seriously the pledge of the international. We ask: what promise does this term hold for Theatre and Performance Studies today? First coined in the late eighteenth century to define a space for inter-state relations, the term has since migrated from law to political and cultural practice, retaining connotations of an ever-expanding, progressive vision of global cooperation. Theatre and Performance Studies have long pursued the promise of the international, from re-thinking “national” canons to developing novel theoretical and methodological foundations for the study of theatre and performance. The series publishes both monographs and edited volumes that represent and at the same time critically interrogate these very processes. We thus invite submissions that examine the evolving diversity of performances from Eurasia, Africa, the Americas, and Oceania. We seek to become an intellectual home to manuscripts that contain an overtly international or transnational dimension, explore new historical, methodological and geographical frontiers, and address pressing contemporary concerns.

For information on the IFTR and its annual conferences, please see the organization’s website: www.iftr.org.

For inquiries regarding the Series, please contact the Editors, Milija Gluhovic (m.gluhovic@warwck.ac.uk) and Emine Fişek (emine.fisek@boun.edu.tr).

Interested authors are invited to submit proposals for collected volumes to the publisher at BRILL, Christa Stevens.
Author:
We read the book, and the book is reading us. In his later novels, Charles Dickens uses the interaction between characters and their audiences within the fiction to dramatise his growing understanding of the pivotal role of spectatorship and choice in a more democratic society. Egotists of all stripes, intent on bending the world to their singular will, would appropriate the power of spectatorship by taking command of the detachment necessary for choice. Dickens’s pluralistic art of sameness and difference redefines that detachment, and liberates choice both inside and outside the novels, for the relationship between characters and their audiences within the narratives actually inscribes our own relationship with them in the performance of reading, a reflective doubling of the fiction upon the reader across time with moral consequences for our spectatorship of our own lives.
Is the Sublime Sustainable? introduces the key points of debate around the sublime while opening new avenues for future inquiry, especially through its comparative aesthetics approach. In it, you will discover how thinking on the sublime emerged historically and then engage with the recent critical scholarship on the topic, including from the fields of theology, philosophy, and literature. The critiques of the sublime are then expanded in dialogue with perspectives from Japanese aesthetics and art, shaping the argument that what is needed today is a sublime that enriches human lives by cultivating profound, participative relationships.
Volume Editors: and
How do objects become contested in settings characterized by (violent) conflict? Why are some things contested by religious actors? How do religious actors mobilize things in conflict situations and how are conflict and violence experienced by religious groups? This volume explores relations between materiality, religion, and violence by drawing upon two fields of scholarship that have rarely engaged with one another: research on religion and (violent) conflict and the material turn within religious studies. This way, this volume sets the stage for the development of new conceptual and methodological directions in the study of religion-related violent conflict that takes materiality seriously.

Contributors are Christoph Baumgartner, Margaretha van Es, Lucien van Liere, Erik Meinema, Birgit Meyer, Daan F. Oostveen, Younes Saramifar, Joram Tarusarira, Tammy Wilks.