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And Australian Drama, Theatre and Performance
Editor:
The aims of Australian Playwrights are:

• To contribute to the interpretation, critical analysis, recognition, promotion, and wider understanding of Australian drama, theatre and performance.
• To publish scholarship on Australian drama, theatre and performance, including: critical studies of a particular playwright, director or company and their plays, productions and/or performances; thematic studies exploring the work of a group of Australian playwrights, theatre companies and/or performance makers; and scholarly books investigating a period, topic or approach in Australian drama, theatre or performance.
• To enliven, enrich, inform and illustrate the study of drama, theatre and performance, both within Australia and internationally, especially for scholars, artists and students.

Each book in the series offers an in-depth study aimed at furthering knowledge of Australian drama, theatre and performance within the broader formation of Australian culture by drawing on a range of primary and secondary sources concerned with playwriting, performance-making, theatre production and/or critical reception.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to the publisher at BRILL, Christa Stevens.
Questions about your manuscript and proposals can also be directed to the Series Editor, Jonathan Bollen.
Editor:
The aims of Australian Playwrights are:

• To contribute to the interpretation, critical analysis, recognition, promotion, and wider understanding of Australian drama, theatre and performance.
• To publish scholarship on Australian drama, theatre and performance, including: critical studies of a particular playwright, director or company and their plays, productions and/or performances; thematic studies exploring the work of a group of Australian playwrights, theatre companies and/or performance makers; and scholarly books investigating a period, topic or approach in Australian drama, theatre or performance.
• To enliven, enrich, inform and illustrate the study of drama, theatre and performance, both within Australia and internationally, especially for scholars, artists and students.

Each book in the series offers an in-depth study aimed at furthering knowledge of Australian drama, theatre and performance within the broader formation of Australian culture by drawing on a range of primary and secondary sources concerned with playwriting, performance-making, theatre production and/or critical reception.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to the publisher at BRILL, Christa Stevens.
Questions about your manuscript and proposals can also be directed to the Series Editor, Jonathan Bollen.
Equine Medicine and Popular Romance in Late Medieval England explores a seldom-studied trove of English veterinary manuals, illuminating how the daily care of horses they describe reshapes our understanding of equine representation in the popular romance of late medieval England. A saint removes a horse’s leg the more easily to shoe him; a wild horse transforms spur wounds into the self-healing practice of bleeding; a messenger calculates time through his horse’s body. Such are the rich and conflicted visions of horse/human connection in the period. Exploring this imagined relation, Francine McGregor reveals a cultural undercurrent in which medieval England is so reliant on equine bodies that human anxieties, desires, and very orientation in daily life are often figured through them. This book illuminates the complex and contradictory yearnings shaping medieval perceptions of the horse, the self, and the identities born of their affinity.
Théorie littéraire et fragilité du divers
L’infini culturel est autour de nous, mais, comme l’horizon, il tend à fuir sous nos yeux. Il est sur les murs investis par le street art ; ou dans les toiles d’araignée auxquelles Tomás Saraceno a rendu hommage ; ou dans les timbres-poste qui, comme savaient Walter Benjamin et Italo Calvino, sont des fenêtres ouvertes sur le monde.
Quelles que soient ses manifestations, l’infini nous engage à considérer l’extraordinaire diversité de la planète.
Face à lui, que faire, en littérature ?
Rester humble, par exemple, et formuler des hypothèses adéquates. Tenter de déjouer les asymétries qui empêchent les uns et les autres de s’exprimer partout dans de bonnes conditions. Revoir les fondements de la world literature et se mettre en résonance avec une culture authentiquement planétaire.


Cultural infinity surrounds us; but, just like the horizon, it tends to run away right in front of our eyes. It might appear on walls full of street art; in the spider webs deeply esteemed by Tomás Saraceno; in postage stamps which, as Walter Benjamin and Italo Calvino acknowledged, are open windows on the world.
Whatever its manifestations, the infinite dares us to consider the extraordinary diversity of the planet. In front of such a challenge, what can we do with literature?
Stay humble, for example, and formulate adequate hypotheses. Try to reduce the asymmetries that prevent us from expressing ourselves everywhere in good conditions. Build the foundations of world literature and resonate with an authentically global culture.
Author:
If, as Robert Craft remarked, ‘religious beliefs were at the core of Stravinsky’s life and work’, why have they not figured more prominently in discussions of his works?
Stravinsky’s coordination of the listener with time is central to the unity of his compositional style. This ground-breaking study looks at his background in Russian Orthodoxy, at less well-known writings of Arthur Lourié and Pierre Souvtchinsky and at the Catholic philosophy of Jacques Maritain, that shed light on the crucial link between Stravinsky’s spirituality and his restoration of time in music.
Recent neuroscience research supports Stravinsky’s eventual adoption of serialism as the natural and logical outcome of his spiritual and musical quest.
Past and Present in the Eighteenth Century
Editors: and
The Long Quarrel: Past and Present in the Eighteenth Century examines how the intellectual clashes emerging from the Quarrel of the Ancients and the Moderns continued to reverberate until the end of the eighteenth century. This extended Quarrel was not just about the value of ancient and modern, but about historical thought in a broader sense. The tension between ancient and modern expanded into a more general tension between past and present, which were no longer seen as essentially similar, but as different in nature. Thus, a new kind of historical consciousness came into being in the Long Quarrel of the eighteenth century, which also gave rise to new ideas about knowledge, art, literature and politics.

Contributors are: Jacques Bos, Anna Cullhed, Håkon Evju, Vera Faßhauer, Andrew Jainchill, Anton M. Matytsin, Iain McDaniel, Larry F. Norman, David D. Reitsam, Jan Rotmans, Friederike Voßkamp, and Christine Zabel.
Volume Editors: and
How has reproduction transformed works of art and literature, their dissemination and their reception? And how does it continue to do so? In what ways have our definitions and practices of reproduction changed over the last centuries thanks to new printing, photographic and digital techniques? These questions are timely. From the medieval copy to contemporary digital culture, including the rise of the printing press and engraving techniques in the Renaissance and the Ancien Régime, myriad modes of reproduction informed both our access to texts and images and our ways of reading, seeing, understanding, discovering and questioning the world.

Dans quelle mesure la reproduction transforme-t-elle les œuvres, leur diffusion et leur réception ? De quelles manières les conceptions et les usages de la reproduction ont-ils subi des transformations majeures au cours des derniers siècles avec la diffusion des pratiques d’impression, de la photographie et des techniques numériques ? Ces questions sont d’une actualité incontournable. De la copie médiévale à la culture numérique contemporaine, en passant par l’essor de l’imprimerie et les techniques de gravure à la Renaissance et sous l’Ancien Régime, les différents modes de reproduction informent non seulement nos accès aux textes et aux images, mais aussi nos manières de lire, de voir, de comprendre, découvrir et d’interroger le monde.
Beckett’s Voices / Voicing Beckett uses ‘voice’ as a prism to investigate Samuel Beckett’s work across a range of texts, genres, and performance cultures. Twenty-one contributors, all members of the Samuel Beckett Working Group of the International Federation for Theatre Research, discuss the musicality of Beckett’s voices, the voice as ‘absent other’, the voices of the vulnerable, the cinematic voice, and enacted voices in performance and media. The volume engages not only with Beckett’s history and legacy, but also with many of the central theoretical issues in theatre studies as a whole. Featuring testimonies from Beckett practitioners as well as emerging and established scholars, it is emblematic of the thriving and diverse community that is twenty-first century Beckett Studies.

Contributors: Svetlana Antropova, Linda Ben-Zvi, Jonathan Bignell, Llewellyn Brown, Julie Campbell, Thirthankar Chakraborty, Laurens De Vos, Everett C. Frost, S. E. Gontarski, Mariko Hori Tanaka, Nicholas E. Johnson, Kumiko Kiuchi, Anna McMullan, Melissa Nolan, Cathal Quinn, Arthur Rose, Teresa Rosell Nicolás, Jürgen Siess, Anna Sigg, Yoshiko Takebe, Michiko Tsushima
Author:
Dans Les écritures de l'image par Jean-Philippe Toussaint Claire Olivier s’intéresse à la manière dont l’écrivain, cinéaste, photographe et plasticien Jean-Philippe Toussaint, expérimente la puissance des images pour composer en ce début du XXIe siècle une œuvre singulière fondée sur des relations transesthétiques. Elle s’attache à montrer que les écritures toussaintiennes, quel que soit le médium choisi, sont visuelles. Elles donnent à voir, à penser, à rêver et composent un « essai-image ». Ce dernier constitue une forme toujours en devenir qui s’appuie sur un processus de « sémentation », néologisme qui désigne une véritable alchimie du signe où le sens est continuellement réactivé par des contextualisations différentes. Sur le mode de l’opera operta, cet « essai-image » toussaintien déploie ses séductions réflexives comme romanesques.

In Les écritures de l'image par Jean-Philippe Toussaint, Claire Olivier is concerned with the way the writer, filmmaker, photographer and plastic artist Jean-Philippe Toussaint experiments with the power of images to create, in the 21st century, a singular work based on transaesthetic relationships. She endeavours to demonstrate that toussaintian writings are visual, independently from the chosen medium. They allow to see, think, dream and compose an “image-essay”. The latter forms a shape always in the making, relying on a “sémentation” process, neologism designating a true sign alchemy where the meaning is constantly revived through different contextualisations. On the model of the opera operta, this toussaintian “image-essay” deploys its reflective seductions as novelistic.
Volume Editors: and
Albee and Influence is the fourth volume in the series New Directions in Edward Albee Studies sponsored by the Edward Albee Society. The volume contains essays, written by leading Albee scholars, that focus on literary and philosophical influences on Edward Albee’s plays as well as essays on writers and works that Albee influenced. Essays focus on Albee’s relationship with such major American playwrights as Thornton Wilder, Amiri Baraka, Sam Shepard, Lanford Wilson and John Guare. There are also contributions on Albee’s work as mentor to young playwrights. The volume also includes an interview with award-winning director Pam McKinnon.