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In Private Salons and the Art World of Enlightenment Paris, Rochelle Ziskin explores in depth two remarkable private gatherings generating significant art criticism during the middle of the eighteenth century. She demonstrates how the sites harboring them came to embody and disseminate their judgments. One politically active group assembled at the house Mme Doublet shared with amateur Petit de Bachaumont; at her “Mondays” for artists, Mme Geoffrin collaborated with the powerful lover of antiquity Caylus and amateurs including Mariette and Watelet. In focusing on official Salons of the Royal Academy of Painting and Sculpture, historians too often overlook the crucial role of these frequent, regular assemblies, where works of art were quite often first assessed and taste shaped.

This book will appeal to readers interested in eighteenth-century French artistic culture, journalism, and women’s patronage. The painters discussed include Boucher, Van Loo, Charles Coypel, Cochin, Vien, Pierre, Lagrenée, and Hubert Robert.
Poissons qui grimpent aux arbres, cigognes qui prennent soin de leurs parents… A l’ère prémoderne, les textes et les arts visuels forment un fabuleux bestiaire qui révèle l’inventivité et la richesse de la réflexion sur les animaux. Les études de ce volume vous font découvrir l’animal dans tous ses états : est-il une simple image anthropomorphique de l’homme ? Un modèle à suivre ? Ou même un être autonome, égal ou supérieur à l’homme ? Explorant une diversité de textes – fables, poésie, roman, récits de voyage, emblèmes – et de médias visuels – peinture, tapisserie, bijouterie, ce volume montre les fructueux échanges prémodernes entre l’histoire naturelle et les arts. En interrogeant implicitement la nécessité de dépasser l’anthropocentrisme et l’anthropomorphisme régnants, il s’inscrit dans les nouvelles tendances de la critique culturelle.

Fish climbing trees, storks taking care of their parents… Premodern textual and visual culture presents us with a fabulous bestiary that reveals ingenious and rich reflections on the animal kingdom. The studies united in this volume will allow you to discover animals in all their possible states: are they simple anthropomorphic images of man? Models to follow? Or autonomous beings, equal or even superior to man? By exploring a large diversity of texts – fables, poetry, novels, travel narratives, emblematic works – and visual media – paintings, tapestries, jewellery, this richly illustrated volume displays the fruitful premodern exchanges between natural history and culture. It follows new trends in cultural criticism by implicitly interrogating the need to move beyond the reigning paradigms of anthropocentrism and anthropomorphism.
Jean-Baptiste Du Bos’ Critical Reflections on Poetry and Painting, first published in French in 1719, is one of the seminal works of modern aesthetics. Du Bos rejected the seventeenth-century view that works of art are assessed by reason. Instead, he believed, audience members have sentiments in response to artworks. Their sentiments are fainter versions of those they would feel in response to actually seeing what the work of art imitates. Du Bos was influenced by John Locke’s empiricism and, in turn, had a major impact on virtually every major eighteenth-century contributor to philosophy of art, including Voltaire, Montesquieu, Diderot, Rousseau, Herder, Lessing, Mendelssohn, Kames, Gerard, and Hume. This is the first modern, annotated and scholarly edition of the Critical Reflections in any language.
Author:
Dans Racine et les trois publics de l’amour Delphine Calle analyse la séduction du théâtre racinien à partir des débats sur les passions du XVIIe siècle français. Concupiscence ou pur amour, amour-propre ou désir de plaire, l’amour est au cœur de la tragédie racinienne : moteur de l’action tragique, il émeut le public. Celui-ci est triple : le protagoniste amoureux est non seulement scruté par les spectateurs dans la salle, passionnés par la passion, il s’expose devant le personnage qu’il aime et paraît devant le tribunal de sa propre conscience. À l’instar des moralistes du XVIIe siècle, grands censeurs du théâtre, ce livre établit le parallèle entre les expériences amoureuse et théâtrale, pour mieux percer la dramaturgie de l’amour chez Racine.

In Racine et les trois publics de l’amour Delphine Calle unravels the seductive power of Racinian tragedy by turning to the 17th-century French debates on love. Whether it is staged as concupiscence or pure love, as self-love or the desire to please, love is at the heart of Racinian theatre: it sparks tragic action and moves its spectators. These spectators are threefold: the tragic lover is not only scrutinized by the real audience, who is passionate about passion, he also feels the gaze of his loved one and of his own conscience, that questions the value of his love. Following the 17th- century moralist theatre critics, this monograph aligns amorous and theatrical experiences, in order to reveal Racine’s dramaturgy of love.
Author:
Dans Les écritures de l'image par Jean-Philippe Toussaint Claire Olivier s’intéresse à la manière dont l’écrivain, cinéaste, photographe et plasticien Jean-Philippe Toussaint, expérimente la puissance des images pour composer en ce début du XXIe siècle une œuvre singulière fondée sur des relations transesthétiques. Elle s’attache à montrer que les écritures toussaintiennes, quel que soit le médium choisi, sont visuelles. Elles donnent à voir, à penser, à rêver et composent un « essai-image ». Ce dernier constitue une forme toujours en devenir qui s’appuie sur un processus de « sémentation », néologisme qui désigne une véritable alchimie du signe où le sens est continuellement réactivé par des contextualisations différentes. Sur le mode de l’opera operta, cet « essai-image » toussaintien déploie ses séductions réflexives comme romanesques.

In Les écritures de l'image par Jean-Philippe Toussaint, Claire Olivier is concerned with the way the writer, filmmaker, photographer and plastic artist Jean-Philippe Toussaint experiments with the power of images to create, in the 21st century, a singular work based on transaesthetic relationships. She endeavours to demonstrate that toussaintian writings are visual, independently from the chosen medium. They allow to see, think, dream and compose an “image-essay”. The latter forms a shape always in the making, relying on a “sémentation” process, neologism designating a true sign alchemy where the meaning is constantly revived through different contextualisations. On the model of the opera operta, this toussaintian “image-essay” deploys its reflective seductions as novelistic.
Volume Editors: and
This edition of John Lydgate’s Dance of Death offers a detailed comparison of the different text versions, a new scholarly edition and translation of Guy Marchant’s 1485 French Danse Macabre text, and an art-historical analysis of its woodcut illustrations.
It addresses the cultural context and historical circumstances of Lydgate’s poem and its model, the mural of 1424-25 with accompanying French poem in Paris, as well as their precursors, notably the Vado mori poems and the Legend of the Three Living and the Three Dead. It discusses authorship, the personification and vizualisation of Death, and the wider dissemination of the Dance. The edited texts include commentaries, notes, and a glossary.
Variations on Racinian Excuses
Author:
This comparative literary study re-evaluates the reciprocal relationship between tragic drama and current approaches to guilt and extenuation. Focussing on Racine but ranging widely, it sheds original light on tragic archetypes (Phaedra, Oedipus, Clytemnestra, Medea and others) through the lenses of performance theory and modern attitudes towards blame.
Tragic drama and legal systems both aim to evaluate the merits of excuses provided on behalf of perpetrators of catastrophic acts. Edward Forman wittily and provocatively explores modern judicial concepts – diminished responsibility, provocation, trauma, ignorance, scapegoating – through the responses of characters in tragedy. Attention is paid to the way in which classical plays (ancient Greek and seventeenth-century French) have been re-interpreted in performance in the light of modern perceptions of human responsibility and helplessness.
Travellers and Trendsetters, 1870-1970
Destination for artists and convalescents, playground of the rich, site of foreign allure, the French Riviera has long attracted visitors to its shores. Ranging through the late nineteenth century, the Belle Epoque, the ‘roaring twenties’, and the emancipatory post-war years, Rosemary Lancaster highlights the contributions of nine remarkable women to the cultural identity of the Riviera in its seminal rise to fame. Embracing an array of genres, she gives new focus to feminine writings never previously brought together, nor as richly critically explored. Fiction, memoir, diary, letters, even cookbooks and choreographies provide compelling evidence of the innovativeness of women who seized the challenges and opportunities of their travels in a century of radical social and artistic change.
Silence, Implicite et Non-Dit chez Rousseau/Silence, the Implicit, and the Unspoken in Rousseau prend acte d’un grand nombre de publications ayant trait à l’analyse par Rousseau des langues et du langage, de la parole par rapport à l’écriture, de la voix (y compris la voix de la nature). Mais ce volume se consacre tout particulièrement au fonctionnement et aux effets du silence, de l’implicite et du non-dit dans la pensée de Rousseau. Son approche est à la fois polyvalente et cohérente, et ses réflexions sur le silence sont associées à d’autres préoccupations esthétiques, politiques, et morales de son œuvre.

Silence, Implicite et Non-Dit chez Rousseau/Silence, the Implicit, and the Unspoken in Rousseau capitalizes on a great number of publications dealing with Rousseau’s analysis of languages and language, speech versus writing, of voice (including the voice of nature). But this volume is particularly dedicated to the study of the functioning and the effects of silence, the implicit and the unspoken in Rousseau’s thought. His approach is both polyvalent and consistent, and his reflections on silence are associated with other aesthetic, political, and moral concerns in his work.
Absences and Displacements
Volume Editors: and
Racine’s Andromaque: Absences and Displacements casts a new look at the dynamism, richness, and complexity of Racine’s first major tragedy (first performed in Paris in 1667), through a collection of articles specially commissioned by the editors Nicholas Hammond and Joseph Harris. Challenging received opinions about the fixity of French ‘classicism’, this volume demonstrates how Racine’s play is preoccupied with absences, displacements, instability, and uncertainty. The articles explore such issues as: movement and transactions, offstage characters and locations, hallucinations and fantasies, love and desire, and translations and adaptations of Racine’s play. This collection will be an invaluable resource for students and scholars of seventeenth-century French theatre.

Contributors: Nicholas Hammond, Joseph Harris, Michael Moriarty, Emilia Wilton-Godberfforde, Delphine Calle, Jennifer Tamas, Michael Hawcroft, Katherine Ibbett, Richard Parish.