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Engaging People, Place and Context with Big hART
Authors: and
This book provides a unique insiders account of the work of Big hART, one of Australia’s leading participatory arts organisations. Founded on the values of social justice, creativity and transformation Big hART seeks to mobilise a range of community resources including young people, elders, artists, and community activists to produce high quality public performances of merit and social worth. Located in diverse geographic, social and cultural settings across Australia’s vast landscape, these creative works generate intergenerational understandings of the cultural processes of individual and collective transformation strengthening capabilities, identity, and connected belonging. This book documents a series of powerful stories that illuminate the ideological, artistic and cultural pathways and learnings gifted by the generosity of participants themselves.
Volume Editors: and
Displacement, relocation, dissociation: each of these terms elicits images of mass migration, homelessness, statelessness, or outsiderness of many kinds, too numerous to name. This book aims to create opportunities for scholars, practitioners, and silenced voices to share theories and stories of progressive and transgressive music pedagogies that challenge the ways music educators and learners think about and practice their arts relative to displacement.
Displacement is defined as encompassing all those who have been forced away from their locations by political, social, economic, climate, and resource change, injustice, and insecurity. This includes:

- refugees and internally displaced persons;
- forced migrants;
- indigenous communities who have been forced off their traditional lands;
- people who have fled homes because of their gender identity and sexual orientation;
- imprisoned individuals;
- persons who seek refuge for reasons of domestic and social violence;
- homeless persons and others who live in transient spaces;
- the disabled, who are relocated involuntarily; and
- the culturally dispossessed, whose languages and heritage have been taken away from them.

In the context of the first ever book on displacement and music education, the authors connect displacement to what music might become to those peoples who find themselves between spaces, parted from the familiar and the familial. Through, in, and because of a variety of musical participations, they contend that displaced peoples might find comfort, inclusion, and welcome of some kinds either in making new music or remembering and reconfiguring past musical experiences.

Contributors are: #4459, Efi Averof Michailidou, Kat Bawden, Rachel Beckles Willson, Marie Bejstam, Rhoda Bernard, Michele Cantoni, Mary L. Cohen, Wayland “X” Coleman, Samantha Dieckmann, Irene (Peace) Ebhohon, Con Fullam, Erin Guinup, Micah Hendler, Hala Jaber, Shaylene Johnson, Arsène Kapikian, Tou SaiKo Lee, Sarah Mandie, David Nnadi, Marcia Ostashewski, Ulrike Präger, Q, Kate Richards Geller, Charlotte Rider, Matt Sakakeeny, Tim Seelig, Katherine Seybert, Brian Sullivan, Mathilde Vittu, Derrick Washington, Henriette Weber, Mai Yang Xiong, Keng Chris Yang, and Nelli Yurina.
Joseph Beuys significantly influenced the development of art in recent decades through his expanded definition of art. In his art and reflections on art, he raised far-reaching questions on the nature of art and its central importance for modern education. His famous claim, “Every human is an artist,“ points to the fundamental ability of every human to be creative in the art of life – with respect to the development of one’s own personality and one’s actions within society. Beuys saw society as an artwork in a permanent process of transformation, a ‘social sculpture‘ in which every person participated, and for which everyone should be educated as comprehensively as possible.

Beuys describes pedagogy as central to his art. This book thus examines important aspects of Beuys’s art and theory and the challenges they raise for contemporary artistic education. It outlines the foundational theoretical qualities of artistic education and discusses the practice of ‘artistic projects’ in a series of empirical examples. The author, Carl-Peter Buschkühle, documents projects he has undertaken with various high school classes. In additional chapters, Mario Urlaß discusses the great value of artistic projects in primary school, and Christian Wagner reflects on his collaboration with the performance artist Wolfgang Sautermeister and school students in a socially-disadvantaged urban area.

Artistic education has become one of the most influential art-pedagogical concepts in German-speaking countries. This book presents its foundations and educational practices in English for the first time.

Core texts addressing creativity in a number of contexts show that creativity as a scientific subject has received principally the attention of Western scholars. Is this due to the fact that Western cultures are more creative or sensitive to creativity than the Eastern cultures? The editors strongly believe that this is more due to the differences in understanding and practising creativity in the West and East than to an Eastern indifference to creativity.

Arts-Based Education: China and Its Intersection with the World investigates the field of arts-based educational practices and research. It argues that reflections on these themes must necessarily be reframed and re-read beyond the limits of colonialist oppositions and suggests a constructive and reflexive approach to theory and methodology, which takes into account intercultural and critical perspectives in these studies.

This volume is the tangible product of the acknowledgement that China and Chinese culture deserves a more systematic and up-to-date dissemination through recent studies that bring together the arts, learning and creativity. It is clustered around two themes: (1) China and its communication with the world through arts-based education in international contexts, and (2) the development of arts education in China.
Series Editors: , , and
Arts, Creativities, and Learning Environments in Global Perspectives aims at investigating the encounters that can occur between the arts and creativities in various learning environments and cultural contexts. The series intends to explore the multiplicity of these approaches by presenting perspectives from diverse learning environments, not solely formal institutions like schools, universities, academies, and colleges, but also non-formal ones (cultural institutions, libraries, museums, theatres, orchestras, archives, organisations, and work-places) or informal ones (play and games, community projects, amateur art, and clubs). This means that a pluralistic view on the artS – indeed, plural – is being embraced by including artistic expressions from all genres and artistic encounters at all levels, including the arts-based, artist-led, arts-inspired, arts-integrated. We encourage contributions from all over the world, in order to challenge a well-established Western-centred understanding of creativity and art (singular). This series will strongly support global perspectives, cross-cultural studies, critical theories, creative dissemination and a broader re-framing of the role of the arts for learning and for society.
The Five Continents of Theatre undertakes the exploration of the material culture of the actor, which involves the actors’ pragmatic relations and technical functionality, their behaviour, the norms and conventions that interact with those of the audience and the society in which actors and spectators equally take part.

The material culture of the actor is organised around body-mind techniques (see A Dictionary of Theatre Anthropology by the same authors) and auxiliary techniques whose variety concern:

■ the diverse circumstances that generate theatre performances: festive or civil occasions, celebrations of power, popular feasts such as carnival, calendar recurrences such as New Year, spring and summer festivals;
■ the financial and organisational aspects: costs, contracts, salaries, impresarios, tickets, subscriptions, tours;
■ the information to be provided to the public: announcements, posters, advertising, parades;
■ the spaces for the performance and those for the spectators: performing spaces in every possible sense of the term;
■ sets, lighting, sound, makeup, costumes, props;
■ the relations established between actor and spectator;
■ the means of transport adopted by actors and even by spectators.

Auxiliary techniques repeat themselves not only throughout different historical periods, but also across all theatrical traditions. Interacting dialectically in the stratification of practices, they respond to basic needs that are common to all traditions when a performance has to be created and staged. A comparative overview of auxiliary techniques shows that the material culture of the actor, with its diverse processes, forms and styles, stems from the way in which actors respond to those same practical needs. The authors’ research for this aspect of theatre anthropology was based on examination of practices, texts and of 1400 images, chosen as exemplars.
Taking a Postcolonial, Aesthetic Turn
Art Therapy in Australia: Taking a Postcolonial, Aesthetic Turn explores and enacts established and emergent art therapy histories, narratives and practices in the specific postcolonial context of contemporary Australia. It is the first published book to attempt to map this terrain. In doing so, the book aims to document important aspects of art therapy in Australia, including how Australian approaches both reiterate and challenge the dominant discourse of art therapy. This book is as much a performance as an account of the potential of art therapy to honour alterity, illuminate possibilities and bear witness to the intrapsychic, relational and social realms. The book offers a selective window into the rambling assemblage that is art therapy in the ‘Great Southern Land’.

Contributors are: Jan Allen, Bronwyn Davies, Claire Edwards, Nicolette Eisdell, Patricia Fenner, John Henzell, Pam Johnston, Lynn Kapitan, Carmen Lawson, Sheridan Linnell, Tarquam McKenna, Michelle Moss, Suzanne Perry, Josephine Pretorius, Jean Rumbold, Victoria Schnaedelbach, Lilian Tan, Jody Thomson, Jill Westwood, Amanda Woodford, and Davina Woods.