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In Agrarian History of the Cuban Revolution, the Brazilian historian Joana Salém Vasconcelos presents in clear language the complicate challenge of overcoming Latin America’s underdevelopment condition, even though a revolutionary process. Based on diverse historical sources, she demonstrates why the sugar plantation economic structure in Cuba was not entirely changed by the 1959’s Revolution.

The author narrates in detail the three dimensions of Cuban agrarian transformation during the decisive 1960s — the land tenure system, the crop regime, and the labour regime —, and its social and political actors. She explains the paths and detours of Cuban agrarian policies, contextualized in a labour-intensive economy that needs desperately to increase productivity and, at the same time, promised widely to emancipate workers from labour exploitation. Cuban agrarian and economic contradictions are well-synthetized with the concept of Peripheral Socialism.
What were the changes in the international position of the Brazilian state during the Lula and Cardoso administrations? How were the classes and class fractions represented? These are the questions that Tatiana Berringer's work seeks to answer. Using the theoretical instruments of the Marxist Nicos Poulantzas, the book identifies the class interests that directed the international action of the Brazilian state. With notable originality, the text presents, theoretically and empirically, a truly consistent Marxist analysis of Brazilian foreign policy, as well as a rich interpretation of the class struggle in current Brazilian politics. The author offers the reader her reflections on the political crisis of 2016 and the foreign policy of the Dilma, Temer, and Bolsonaro governments.
In this latest work by the prolific Mexican theorist Adrián Sotelo Valencia, the COVID-19 pandemic is shown to have merely exacerbated the profound world capitalist crisis rooted in the 1970s structural exhaustion of the third industrial revolution. Sotelo explains how the current 4.0 revolution whose articulating axis is the development and expansion of artificial intelligence, Big Data, algorithms, 3D printing, the Internet of Things, and digital platforms constitutes a global strategy of capital and the state aimed at detaining the global capitalist crisis. The Digital Revolution heralds a new international division of labour with severe repercussions for labour, especially in dependent countries like Mexico. The foreword by Andrés Piqueras of the Universidad Jaume I de Castellón underlines the urgency to heed this insightful analysis.
In The Criminalization of Democratic Politics in the Global South, Zaffaroni, Caamaño and Vegh Weis offer an account of the misuse of the law to criminalize progressive political leaders in Latin America. Indeed, more and more popular political leaders in the region end up imprisoned or persecuted, even while in power. Inacio Lula da Silva, former President of Brazil and author of the preface, is the quintaessential case of this worrying process.

Despite the centrality of this juridical-political phenomenon in Latin America, it is hardly known to the Anglo-Saxon public. This book seeks to fill this gap. In an accessible style, the authors deconstruct the judicial language and the main problematics of lawfare, calling attention to the fact that it might end up demolishing the rule of law for the sake of fostering the most cruel forms of neoliberalism.
Series Editors: and
Critical Latin America explores the historical and contemporary currents, connections, and conflicts of Latin Americans’ ideas and identities. The editors are particularly interested in the intersections of identities—gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, class—and such public and private fora as politics, culture, art, religion, and family. Interdisciplinary in nature, the series also examines how forces such as migration, revolution, economic development, production of knowledge (particularly scientific and medical), social movements, education, and the environment shape the ideas, identities, and lived experiences of Latin Americans.

The editors invite proposals for original monographs, edited collections, translations, and critical primary source editions. Aiming to strike a balance between studies of the colonial and national eras, the series will consider manuscripts that deal with any period from the first European encounters in the Americas through the twenty-first century. The series embraces history on all scales, from the micro to the macro. The editors are as interested in relationships between people of African, Asian, European, and indigenous heritage in rural and urban communities as they are in the geopolitical relationships between nations and the transnational relationships of groups that defy borders.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts by email to the publisher Jason Prevost. Please direct all other correspondence to Associate Editor Debbie de Wit.

The editors of Critical Latin America prefer that contributors adhere to the Chicago Manual of Style.

*A paperback edition of select titles in the series, for individual purchase only, will be released approximately 12 months after publication of the hardcover edition.

Author:
The Shifting Ground of Globalization: Labor and Mineral Extraction at Vale S.A. describes the transformation of the formerly state-owned Brazilian mining company into a Transnational Corporation, global leader in iron ore and nickel extraction. Through ethnographic research in Brazil and Canada, in places as different as Carajás, in the heart of the Amazon rainforest, and Sudbury, in northern Ontario, Thiago Aguiar dialogues with the theories of global capitalism and takes the case of the largest Latin American company as a telling example of the integration of the Brazilian economy into capitalist globalization and its consequences for workers, communities, and the environment in the first decades of the twenty-first century – when many celebrated the BRICS as an alternative to neoliberal globalization.
Foro Hispánico is a peer-reviewed book series devoted to the study of Spanish and Spanish-American culture(s) in the global world. The series offers a forum for internationally focused research that analyses how cultural and literary practices both shape, and themselves are shaped by, global challenges in the Spanish speaking world.
Proposals are welcome for academic monographs and joint volumes, both in English and Spanish. We especially encourage studies that cross disciplines and national borders. Possible interdisciplinary topics of interest include, but are not limited to, the connections between cultural and literary practices, and immigration, race, gender, politics, art, intellectual history, travel writing, rhetoric and anthropology.

Foro Hispánico es una colección académica revisada por pares de monografías centradas en el estudio de las culturas españolas e hispanoamericanas dentro del contexto del mundo globalizado. La colección ofrece un foro para investigaciones desarrolladas en el ámbito internacional que se centren sobre cómo las prácticas culturales y literarias dan y toman forma a los desafíos globales que acontecen en el mundo de lengua española.

Son bienvenidas propuestas para monografías académicas y volúmenes científicos conjuntos escritos tanto en español como en inglés. Especialmente incentivamos estudios transdisciplinares y transnacionales. Algunos temas de posible interés interdisciplinar incluyen, pero no se limitan tan sólo a estas, las conexiones entre prácticas culturales y literarias e inmigración, género, política, arte, historia intelectual, escritura de viaje, retórica y antropología.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to the publisher at BRILL, Masja Horn
Please advise our Guidelines for a Book Proposal.
Memory, Movement, and Modernities across Hemispheres
Series Editors:
Richard T. Chu, University of Massachusetts
Augusto F. Espiritu, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Mariam Lam, University of California, Riverside

For some time now, studies on Southeast Asians have often situated the experiences of these peoples within the territorial boundaries of their countries and within the regional framework of Southeast Asia. Geographically fixed to the Philippines, Thailand, Burma, Cambodia, Laos, Vietnam, Indonesia, Brunei, East Timor, and Singapore, Southeast Asia emerges, as critical area studies underscore, as a site marked by multivalent politics, histories, and cultures. The processes of globalization, neoliberalism, and war have unmoored such fixities in the Eastern as much as in the Western Hemispheres, causing tectonic shifts in the constructions of memory, massive population movements and migrations, and ever new projects and worldings responding to various regimes of the “modern.” Whereas Southeast Asian studies may remain regionally focused, Southeast Asian American studies must increase its focus on the understudied complex, transnational flows and manifold expressions of the Southeast Asian diasporic experience.

Attendant to the rise of the Southeast Asian diasporas, Global Southeast Asian Diasporas (SEAD) provides a peer-reviewed forum for studies that specifically investigate the histories and experiences of Southeast Asian diasporic subjects across hemispheres. We especially invite studies that critically focus on the Southeast Asian experience from a transnational, comparative, and international perspective. SEAD welcomes submissions from a wide array of disciplinary fields (including history, sociology, political science, cultural studies, literary studies, and anthropology, among others) that innovatively interrogate themes such as refugees, political asylum, gender/sexuality, colonialism, globalization, empire, nation/nationalism, ethnicity, and transnationalism.

Manuscripts should be at least 90,000 words in length (including footnotes and bibliography). Manuscripts may also include illustrations, tables, and other visual material. The editors will consider proposals for original monographs, edited collections, translations, and critical primary source editions.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts by email to the Publisher, Chunyan Shu.
Editor:
The objective of the CEDLA Latin America Studies series (CLAS) is to publish the results of original research on Latin America in the field of the Social Sciences, understood in a broad sense to include History, Economics and Geography. CEDLA is an inter-university centre for research and documentation on Latin America located in Amsterdam.

For titles up to volume 93 please visit the CEDLA website.