Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 153 items for :

  • Literature & Linguistics x
  • Upcoming Publications x
  • Just Published x
  • Search level: Titles x
Clear All
Author:
This book presents an empirically based examination of language patterns found among the Israeli Druze community, which is profiled against that of the Arabs in Israel. The results document the emergence of a mixed language previously undescribed and provides a socio-political analysis.
This study intends thus to make a contribution to the debate on "mixed languages", introducing a model that facilitates the analysis of the link bewteen codeswitching and sociopolitical identity. Special attention is paid to the assessment of language and identity issues of Golan Heights Druze and Israeli Druze, taking into exam two major political debates within these communities, regarding the Israeli Nation-state Law and the so-called ‘Syrian–Israeli secret Golan deal’ speculation.
This volume contains an English translation of the Arabic translation and commentary on the book of Proverbs composed by one of the most acclaimed, innovative, and prolific exegetes of the Karaite “Golden Age” (10th –11th centuries), Yefet ben ʿEli ha-Levi. A critical edition and an extensive introduction was published by Ilana Sasson as vol. 1 (KTS 8) in 2016. Dr. Sasson worked for many years on an English translation of the work and, before her untimely death in 2017, passed her unfinished manuscript to the series editors. The translation was then completed, edited, and prepared for publication by Dr. Wechsler. Yefet’s commentary on Proverbs is a masterpiece of literary and rational-contextual analysis of one of the most difficult and important books of wisdom in the Hebrew Bible. His work is an invaluable link in the history of interpretation of the book of Proverbs.
rwḥ and Humanity in Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, and Job
רוח is vital to the Hebrew Bible’s understanding of God, the world, and humanity. However, the word defies easy categorisation or casual analysis, especially when referring to humans and their experiences.
Integrating insights from several sub-fields of Cognitive Linguistics with detailed exegesis, this book examines each anthropological use of רוח in Proverbs, Job, and Ecclesiastes, demonstrating how even complicated words in difficult passages can be fruitfully understood. As well as furthering the application of contemporary linguistics to ancient texts, this study sheds new light on the Hebrew Bible’s understanding of humanity and their relationship to the world and to the divine.
Yiddish-Slavic Language Contact and Its Linguistic Outcome
Yiddish, the language of Eastern-European Jews, has so far been mostly described as Germanic within the framework of the traditional, divergence-based Language Tree Model. Meanwhile, advances in contact linguistics allow for a new approach, placing the idiom within the mixed language spectrum, with the Slavic component playing a significant role. So far, the Slavic elements were studied as isolated, adstratal borrowings. This book argues that they represent a coherent system within the grammar. This suggests that the Slavic languages had at least as much of a constitutive role in the inception and development of Yiddish as German and Hebrew. The volume is copiously illustrated with examples from the vernacular language.
With a contribution of Anna Pilarski, University of Szczecin.
With English Translation and a Collation with the Hebrew and French Source Texts. Abraham Ibn Ezra’s Astrological Writings, Volume 8.
Author:
The present volume focuses on Henry Bate of Mechelen (1246–after 1310), the first scholar to bring Ibn Ezra’s astrological work to the knowledge of Latin readers. The volume has two main objectives. The first is to offer as complete and panoramic an account as possible of Bate’s translational project. Therefore, this volume offers critical editions of all six of Bate’s complete translations of Ibn Ezra’s astrological writings. The second objective is to accompany Bate’s Latin translations with literal English translations and to offer a thorough collation of the Latin translation (with their English translations) against the Hebrew and French source texts.

This is volume 2 of a two-volume set.
With English Translation and a Collation with the Hebrew and French Source Texts. Abraham Ibn Ezra’s Astrological Writings, Volume 8.
Author:
The present volume focuses on Henry Bate of Mechelen (1246–after 1310), the first scholar to bring Ibn Ezra’s astrological work to the knowledge of Latin readers. The volume has two main objectives. The first is to offer as complete and panoramic an account as possible of Bate’s translational project. Therefore, this volume offers critical editions of all six of Bate’s complete translations of Ibn Ezra’s astrological writings. The second objective is to accompany Bate’s Latin translations with literal English translations and to offer a thorough collation of the Latin translation (with their English translations) against the Hebrew and French source texts.

This is volume 1 of a two-volume set.
This volume presents the reader with a fascinating collection of hymns composed by El‘azar the Babylonian, an Arab-Jewish poet who is active in Baghdad during the first half of the 13th century. His religious oeuvre consists of dozens of hymns, coming down to us from the treasures of the Cairo Genizah and the Firkovicz Collections. His compositions provide a cross-section of genres and liturgical destinations. El‘azar’s devotional hymnology is characterised by a striking spiritual tendency which reveals his familiarity with contemporary Sufism in both Muslim and Jewish circles.
A Textual Reconstruction of Chapters 1–7
The first half of the book of Daniel contains world-famous stories like the Writing on the Wall. These stories have mostly been transmitted in Aramaic, not Hebrew, as has the influential apocalypse of Daniel 7. This Aramaic corpus shows clear signs of multiple authorship. Which different textual layers can we tease apart, and what do they tell us about the changing function of the Danielic material during the Second Temple Period? This monograph compares the Masoretic Text of Daniel to ancient manuscripts and translations preserving textual variants. By highlighting tensions in the reconstructed archetype underlying all these texts, it then probes the tales’ prehistory even further, showing how Daniel underwent many transformations to yield the book we know today.