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The first of the three major thirteenth-century Hebrew encyclopedias of science and philosophy, the Midrash ha-Ḥokhmah presents a survey of philosophy and mathematical sciences. Originally written in Arabic, the author, Judah ben Solomon ha-Cohen, who was inspired by Maimonides’ Guide of the Perplexed, translated his own work into Hebrew in the 124os in Italy when he was in the service of Frederick II. The part on natural philosophy edited and translated in this volume is the first Hebrew text to draw extensively on Averroes’ commentaries on Aristotle. Over several chapters, Resianne Fontaine explores Judah’s ambivalent attitude towards Aristotelian philosophy.
With English Translation and a Collation with the Hebrew and French Source Texts Abraham Ibn Ezra’s Astrological Writings, Volume 8.
Author:
The present volume focuses on Henry Bate of Mechelen (1246–after 1310), the first scholar to bring Ibn Ezra’s astrological work to the knowledge of Latin readers. The volume has two main objectives. The first is to offer as complete and panoramic an account as possible of Bate’s translational project. Therefore, this volume offers critical editions of all six of Bate’s complete translations of Ibn Ezra’s astrological writings. The second objective is to accompany Bate’s Latin translations with literal English translations and to offer a thorough collation of the Latin translation (with their English translations) against the Hebrew and French source texts.

This is a two-volume set.
With English Translation and a Collation with the Hebrew and French Source Texts. Abraham Ibn Ezra’s Astrological Writings, Volume 8.
Author:
The present volume focuses on Henry Bate of Mechelen (1246–after 1310), the first scholar to bring Ibn Ezra’s astrological work to the knowledge of Latin readers. The volume has two main objectives. The first is to offer as complete and panoramic an account as possible of Bate’s translational project. Therefore, this volume offers critical editions of all six of Bate’s complete translations of Ibn Ezra’s astrological writings. The second objective is to accompany Bate’s Latin translations with literal English translations and to offer a thorough collation of the Latin translation (with their English translations) against the Hebrew and French source texts.

This is volume 2 of a two-volume set.
With English Translation and a Collation with the Hebrew and French Source Texts. Abraham Ibn Ezra’s Astrological Writings, Volume 8.
Author:
The present volume focuses on Henry Bate of Mechelen (1246–after 1310), the first scholar to bring Ibn Ezra’s astrological work to the knowledge of Latin readers. The volume has two main objectives. The first is to offer as complete and panoramic an account as possible of Bate’s translational project. Therefore, this volume offers critical editions of all six of Bate’s complete translations of Ibn Ezra’s astrological writings. The second objective is to accompany Bate’s Latin translations with literal English translations and to offer a thorough collation of the Latin translation (with their English translations) against the Hebrew and French source texts.

This is volume 1 of a two-volume set.
Author:
The Ma‘asé-Ester, “Esther’s affairs”, is a 14th-century Judeo-Provençal poem on the story of Esther, intended for a recital during the banquet for Purim.
The short poem – recently discovered in the single manuscript that preserves it – is a new precious document that enriches a small corpus of medieval Judeo-Provençal texts. This book offers the first critical edition of the complete text accompanied by a detailed study of the sources and the language. It guides us in understanding why the story of Esther became such a popular theme in 14th-century Provence, and in what way the Avignon Papacy and the studies on Moses Maimonides influenced this literary novelty.
Volume Editors: and
In The Hebrew Bible: A Millennium, scholars from different fields and dealing with different material sources are trying to consider the Hebrew Bible as a whole. The development of new databases and other technological tools have an increasing impact on research practices. By inviting doctoral students, young researchers, and established scholars to contribute, this interdisciplinary book showcases methods and perspectives which can support future scientific collaborations in the field of the Hebrew Bible.
This edited volume gathers relevant research from Dead Sea Scrolls Studies, Cairo Genizah Studies, European Genizah Studies, and from Late Medieval Biblical Manuscript Studies.
Editor:
This richly illustrated volume offers the most comprehensive and updated survey on about sixteen thousand Hebrew manuscript fragments reused as book-bindings and preserved in hundreds of libraries and archives in Italy. Contributions by the leading scholars in the field elucidate specific collections and genres no less than individual fragments, bringing to new life a forgotten library of medieval Jewish books, as almost 160 Talmudic codices, which include the Mishna, Tosefta, Palestinian Talmud and, for the most part, the Babylonian one, and several hitherto unknown texts. The contribution of these fragments to the ongoing research on the “European Genizah”, as the Books within Books Project, and to Jewish Studies in general cannot be overestimated.
A critical scholarly edition of the Karaite Yefet ben ʿEli ha-Levi's (10th-century) Judaeo-Arabic translation of and commentary on the prophetic books Amos, Haggai, and Malachi, including a comparison of 19 manuscripts and an extensive introduction. The introduction discusses Yefet's exegesis of the three books, his approaches to the biblical narratives, his polemic with the Rabbanites, and the exegetical principles he uses in his translation of the verses. Yefet ben ʿEli was one of the most important biblical commentators of the early Middle Ages. He translated all the books of the Bible into Judaeo-Arabic and composed a long commentary on them. His commentaries on the books of Amos, Haggai, and Malachi reflect his method of biblical exegesis and present unique interpretive ideas.
Author:
This work contains a Hebrew and an English section. The former is an edition of the Maḥberot Eitan ha-Ezraḥi, a maqama collection composed after the pattern of al-Ḥarizi’s Taḥkemoni. The edition opens with an introduction, translated at the beginning of the English section. The rest of the English section is devoted to an analysis of that branch of the Hebrew maqama tradition that is rooted in the Maqāmāt of al-Ḥarīrī, starting from a review of the evidence for the presence of the Maqāmāt in the world of Hebrew letters, through the Taḥkemoni, and concluding with the Maḥbarot of Immanuel ha-Romi.
Author:
Through the application of scientific methods of analysis to a corpus of medieval manuscripts found in the Cairo Genizah, this work aims to gain a better understanding of the writing materials used by Jewish communities at that time, shedding new light not only on the production of manuscripts in the Middle Ages, but also on the life of those Jewish communities.