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Brill's Classical Studies E-Books Online, Collection 2023 is the electronic version of the book publication program of Brill in the field of Classical Studies in 2023.

Coverage:
Ancient Philosophy, Ancient History, Ancient Religion, Greek and Roman Literature, Epigraphy & Papyrology, Archeology

This collection includes La splendeur des dieux: Quatre études iconographiques sur l’hellénisme égyptien, a 2 volume set.

This E-Book Collection is part of Brill's Classical Studies E-Books Online Collection.

The title list and free MARC records are available for download here.

For other pricing options, consortium arrangements and free 30-day trials contact us at sales-us@brill.com (the Americas) or sales-nl@brill.com (Europe, Middle East, Africa & Asia-Pacific).
This collection includes 6 volumes of the series Papyrologica Lugduno-Batava (1941-2023). It contains publications of papyrological, mainly documentary texts, as well as articles and monographs, on the themes of law and society in Ancient Egypt, in particular in the Graeco-Roman period. The focus of the series lies on the Greek and Demotic sources, however attention is also given to documents in Hieratic, Coptic and Latin. The series is a publication of the Foundation for the Papyrological Institute of the University of Leiden. The aim of the Foundation is the promotion of the study of Greek and Demotic papyrology in Leiden. All publications in this series are peer reviewed.
SEG LXVII covers newly published Greek inscriptions and studies on previously known documents from the year 2017, with occasional additions from previous years that have been missed in earlier volumes and from studies published after 2016 but pertaining to material from 2017.
Brill's Annotated Bibliographies is a series offering a new set of bibliographical tools in the Classics. We welcome proposals for volumes in this series. The bibliographies would be up to 500 pp. in length and in English. Each volume should provide an exhaustive survey of the authoritative text editions, commentaries, translations, concordances, surveys and electronics tools, important or influential items of the secondary literature (indicating their position and impact in current debate). They should fill a need for scholars active in other (not necessarily adjacent) fields who require a quick and reliable access to the literature of the theme of the bibliography and would be of use to university teachers in preparing customised bibliographies for their students. Ideally, the bibliographies should also call attention to important Italian, German or French works, which are often overlooked by English-speaking students and even scholars.

The contents of most bibliographies will be as follows:
- a general introduction, outlining where possible the development of scholarship on the theme
- the bare facts: title, author, year of publication, type of work (article, book, etc.), size, publisher
- some description of the contents of the work
- an evaluation (in a minority of cases)
- a subject index (cf. Brisson's Plato bibliography in Lustrum)

In this series, Eric Cullhed (University of Uppsala) and S. Douglas Olson (University of Minnesota) combine to provide the reader with a new critical edition of the Greek text of Byzantine scholar and rhetorician Eustathius of Thessalonica’s Commentary on the Odyssey, composed during the latter half of the twelfth century CE. A much desired facing English translation of the Commentary is included as well. Eustathius’ commentary collects material from a wide range of sources which explain or expand on words, phrases and ideas in the Homeric epic. His original comments are blended with extracts from earlier commentators, especially the Homeric scholia. The text is also an important source for fragments of lost works of ancient literature, for the history of exegesis and lexicography, and for Byzantine cultural history. Full critical, citation and source apparatuses are included.
In the post-Enlightenment world, philosophy and religion have come to occupy different, even opposed, domains. But how were they related before this? What were the commonalities and dissimilarities between them? Did they already contain the seeds of their later division – or do they still share enough in common to allow meaningful conversation between them?

This new Brill series “Ancient Philosophy & Religion” provides an interdisciplinary platform for monographs, edited volumes and commentaries on this issue. It is edited by two leading scholars in the fields it brings together, George Boys-Stones (Ancient Philosophy) and George van Kooten (New Testament Studies), and is supported by an editorial board whose members are known for their work in the area. It invites scholars of ancient philosophy, Classics, early Judaism, ancient Judaism, New Testament & early Christianity, and all other relevant fields, to showcase their research on ancient philosophy and religion and to contribute to the debate.

The series’ subject matter is symbolized by its icon, used by courtesy and permission of the New Acropolis Museum in Athens. It represents a dialogue between philosophers, as shown on one of the reliefs of the funeral sacrificial table (mensa) from the “House of Proclus” on the Southern slope of the Acropolis at Athens, excavated in 1955. Dating from 350-325 BC, the reliefs of the mensa depict, after the lamentation and the farewell, the posthumous encounter of the deceased with the philosophers (1950 NAM 90).

The editors very much welcome proposals for monographs, edited volumes and even commentaries on relevant texts.

Brill’s narratological commentaries on ancient texts aims at publishing commentaries to both well-known narrative texts from Greek and Latin literature and texts for which hardly any commentary is available yet, such as the novels or late epics. It also welcomes commentaries on Byzantine narrative texts, medieval texts in Latin, and books from the Hebrew Bible and early Christian texts, including the New Testament.
The commentaries in this series approach the ancient texts with a relatively new but successful and exciting literary method: narratology. In addition to other specialised forms of commentaries such as historical, linguistic and philosophical commentaries, a narratological commentary lays bare the narrative artistry of texts, for instance the way in which a narrator communicates with his narratees, accelerates or slows down the rhythm of narration, represents space, anticipates later developments or inserts flashbacks, focalises events or makes us look at them through the eyes of one of his characters, represents the words spoken by characters, and endows the setting of events with a thematic or symbolic meaning.

The commentaries are written in English, but German manuscripts may be included as well. The theoretical apparatus is derived preferably from standard introductions like I.J.F. de Jong, Narratology and Classics: a practical guide, Monika Fludernik, An Introduction to Narratology, or David Herman, Basic Elements of Narrative.