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Written by the poet-painter Karel van Mander, who finished it in June 1603, the Grondt der edel, vry schilderconst (Foundation of the Noble, Free Art of Painting) was the first systematic treatise on schilderconst (the art of painting / picturing) to be published in Dutch (Haarlem: Paschier van Wes[t]busch, 1604). This English-language edition of the Grondt, accompanied by an introductory monograph and a full critical apparatus, provides unprecedented access to Van Mander’s crucially important art treatise. The book sheds light on key terms and critical categories such as schilder, manier, uyt zijn selven doen, welstandt, leven and gheest, and wel schilderen, and both exemplifies and explicates the author’s distinctive views on the complementary forms and functions of history and landscape.
Author:
في كتاب حلب في كتابات المؤرّخين والباحثين والزوّار والأدباء يسعى حسن قجّـة إلى تسليط الضوء على التاريخ العريق لمدينة حلب من خلال الأوصاف والانطباعات والشهادات التي كتبها حولها مئات المؤرّخين والزوّار والأدباء من أنحاء العالم، عبر 15 قرناً. ويرصد الكتاب علاقة هذه النصوص بالأوجُه الحضارية المتعددة للمدينة، التي تُعرّف عراقتُها بالمفهوم الزمني التاريخي المديد والمتنوع، وبمفهوم الإرث الثقافيّ الواسع بأشكاله الماديّة وغير الماديّة، وبمفهوم الطابع التعدّدي المنفتح الذي رافق المدينة عبر معظم مراحلها التاريخية. ويهدف الكتاب إلى استقصاء القيمة الفعليّة والرمزيّة لمدينة حلب في نظر تلك الكتابات، من النواحي الموضوعية بصورةٍ رئيسة، ومن النواحي العاطفية في بعض الأحيان.
ويُستهلّ الكتاب بتقديم لمحةٍ عن تاريخ مدينة حلب، معزّزةٍ بملحقٍ للصور، كما يوْرِد عناوين مئات المؤلفات التي كُتبت عن حلب، أكثرها تتمحور حولها بالتحديد، وبعضُها يتحدث عنها في سياقاتٍ متّصلة.

Aleppo in the Writings of Historians, Scholars, Visitors and Literati sheds light on the ancient history of Aleppo, through descriptions, impressions and testimonies written by hundreds of historians, visitors, and writers, from across the globe, and over a time span of fifteen centuries.
In this book, Hasan Kujjah discusses the relationship of these texts with the various civilizational aspects of the city, whose authenticity is characterized by its long existence, broad cultural heritage (in both tangible and intangible forms), and the open, pluralistic character, that distinguished the city through most of its historical stages.
The book begins by providing an overview of the history of Aleppo, is supplemented by an appendix of photos, and lists the titles of hundreds of books written about the city.
Textual, Visual and Musical Receptions of Horace from the 15th to the 18th Century
This volume explores various perceptions, adaptations and appropriations of both the personality and the writings of Horace in the early modern age. The fifteen essays in this book are devoted to uncharted facets of the reception of Horace and thus substantially broaden our picture of the Horatian tradition. Special attention is given to the legacy of Horace in the visual arts and in music, beyond the domain of letters. By focusing on the multiple channels through which the influence of Horace was felt and transmitted, this volume aims to present instances of the Horatian heritage across the media, and to stimulate a more thorough reflection on an interdisciplinary and multi-medial approach to the exceptionally rich and variegated afterlife of Horace.

Contributors: Veronica Brandis, Philippe Canguilhem, Giacomo Comiati, Karl A.E. Enenkel, Carolin A. Giere, Inga Mai Groote, Luke B.T. Houghton, Chris Joby, Marc Laureys, Grantley McDonald, Lukas Reddemann, Bernd Roling, Robert Seidel, Marcela Slavíková, Paul J. Smith, and Tijana Žakula.
Volume 4: Islam, Europe and Beyond: A. Islam and the Middle Ages. B. Manuscripts, a Basis of Knowledge and Science, C. History of the Discipline, D. Obituaries, E. Indices
Author:
From the Greeks to the Arabs and Beyond written by Hans Daiber, is a six volume collection of Daiber’s scattered writings, journal articles, essays and encyclopaedia entries on Greek-Syriac-Arabic translations, Islamic theology and Sufism, the history of science, Islam in Europe, manuscripts and the history of oriental studies. The collection contains published (since 1967) and unpublished works in English, German, Arabic, Persian and Turkish, including editions of Arabic and Syriac texts. The publication mirrors the intercultural character of Islamic thought and sheds new light on many aspects ranging from the Greek pre-Socratics to the Malaysian philosopher Naquib al-Attas. A main concern is the interpretation of texts in print or in manuscripts, culminating in two catalogues (Vol. V and VI), which contain descriptions of newly discovered, mainly Arabic, manuscripts in all fields.
Vol. I: Graeco-Syriaca and Arabica.
Vol. II: Islamic Philosophy.
Vol. III: From God’s Wisdom to Science: A. Islamic Theology and Sufism; B. History of Science.
Vol. IV: Islam, Europe and Beyond: A. Islam and Middle Ages; B. Manuscripts – a Basis of Knowledge and Science; C. History of the Discipline; D. Obituaries; E. Indexes.
Vol. V: Unknown Arabic Manuscripts from Eight Centuries – Including one Hebrew and Two Ethiopian Manuscripts: Daiber Collection III.
Vol. VI: Arabic, Syriac, Persian and Latin Manuscripts on Philosophy, Theology, Science and Literature. Films and Offprints: Daiber Collection IV.
Editor:
Edmund Waller (1606–1687): New Perspectives reappraises the life and works of an important but neglected seventeenth-century English poet. Admired at court in the 1630s and at the Restoration, Waller made a deep impression on contemporary poetry: his collection of Poems (1645) was widely acclaimed and had an ‘extraordinary impact’ on future poets. The book investigates, among other things, Waller’s political views on affairs of state, his social and literary interactions with younger poets, his friendship with John Evelyn while in exile, his technical poetic innovations, his rivalry with Andrew Marvell, his elegies, and his contemporary and posthumous reputation.

The contributors are Warren Chernaik, Daniel Cook, Stephen Deng, Martin Dzelzainis, Richard Hillyer, Philip Major, Michael P. Parker, Tessie Prakas, Geoffrey Smith, Thomas Ward, and Gillian Wright.
A Comparative Study of Four National Literary Traditions
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This literary analysis of the representation of ‘Gypsies’ in juvenile literature is unique in its comparative scope, as well as in the special attention to rare pre-1850 narratives, the period in which juvenile literature developed as a specific genre. Most studies on the subject are about one national literary tradition or confined to a limited period. In this study Dutch, English, French and German texts are analysed and discussed with reference to main academic publications on the subject. Emphasis is on the rich variation in narrative presentations, rather than on an inventory of images or prejudices. An important topic is the fundamental difference between early English and German narratives. Important because of the wide dissemination of German stories.
Zur sozialethischen Produktivkraft einer Emotion in der literarischen Kultur des 18. Jahrhunderts
Author:
Christian Sieg weist die sozialethische Relevanz der Scham für die literarische Kultur der Aufklärung nach und plädiert für eine kulturtheoretische Neubewertung dieser peinigenden Emotion: Als moralische Emotion gehört Scham zum Projekt der Aufklärung selbst. Die Aufklärung will die Disposition zur Scham schützen, fürchtet jedoch das episodische Schamempfinden, weil es individuelle Selbstbestimmung gefährdet. Die Schamvermeidung fungiert daher als sozialethischer Imperativ, dessen kulturelle Produktivität sich in der Literatur des 18. Jahrhunderts zeigt. Die Studie widmet sich der Kritik der Scham in den Diskursen über Satire und über Selbstbeobachtung. Verfolgt wird, wie das traditionelle Verständnis der Satire als Schamstrafe einem humoristischen Welt- und Selbstverhältnis weicht und die Semantik der Freundschaft die Entwicklung therapeutischer Interaktion prägt. Im Mittelpunkt stehen dabei die sozialethischen Schreibprogramme von Christoph Martin Wieland und Karl Philipp Moritz.
Italian Translations of Hebrew Literature in the Early Modern Period
This volume presents the culmination of research on an almost ignored literary corpus: the translations into literary Italian of classical Hebrew texts made by Jews between 1550 and 1650. It includes poetry, philosophy and wisdom literature, as well as dictionaries and biblical translations produced in what their authors viewed as a national tongue, common to Christians and Jews. In so doing, the authors/translators explicitly left behind the so-called Judeo-Italian. These texts, many of them being published for the first time, are studied in the context of intellectual and literary history. The book is an original contribution showing that the linguistic acculturation of German Jews in the late 18th century occurred in Italy 150 years earlier.
Author:
What is the ocean’s role in human and planetary history? How have writers, sailors, painters, scientists, historians, and philosophers from across time and space poetically envisioned the oceans and depicted human entanglements with the sea? In order to answer these questions, Søren Frank covers an impressive range of material in A Poetic History of the Oceans: Greek, Roman and Biblical texts, an Icelandic Saga, Shakespearean drama, Jens Munk’s logbook, 19th century-writers such as James Fenimore Cooper, Herman Melville, Jules Michelet, Victor Hugo, Jules Verne, Jonas Lie, and Joseph Conrad as well as their 20th and 21st century-heirs like J. G. Ballard, Jens Bjørneboe, and Siri Ranva Hjelm Jacobsen.
A Poetic History of the Oceans promotes what Frank labels an amphibian comparative literature and mobilises recent theoretical concepts and methodological developments in Blue Humanities, Blue Ecology, and New Materialism to shed new light on well-known texts and introduce readers to important, but lesser-known Scandinavian literary engagements with the sea.
This book brings together translation and multilingualism, underlining their connection while addressing their evolving history in medieval and early modern Iberia and the Mediterranean. Herein lies its novelty and importance: bringing together translation and multilingualism and studying them from a trans-national point of view. Both translation and multilingualism are an integral part of Iberian culture and have shaped its literary traditions and cultural production for centuries, contributing to the transmission of knowledge and texts, and to the formation of the religious, linguistic, and ethnic identities that came to define medieval and early modern Iberia.
Contributors are Jason Busic, John Dagenais, Emily C. Francomano, Marcelo E. Fuentes, Claire Gilbert, Roser Salicrú i Lluch, Anita J. Savo, and Noam Sienna.