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Studies in Book History, the Classical Tradition, and Humanism in Honor of Craig Kallendorf
Habent sua fata libelli honors the work of Craig Kallendorf, offering studies in several fields in which he chiefly distinguished himself: the history of the book and reading, the classical tradition and reception studies, Renaissance humanism, and Virgilian scholarship with a special focus on the creative transformation of the Aeneid through the centuries. The volume is rounded out by an appreciation of Craig Kallendorf, including a review of his scholarship and its significance.

In addition to the topics mentioned above, the volume’s twenty-five contributions are of relevance to those working in the fields of classical philology, Neo-Latin, political philosophy, poetry and poetics, printing and print culture, Romance languages, art history, translation studies, and Renaissance and early modern Europe generally.

Contributors: Alessandro Barchiesi, Susanna Braund, Hélène Casanova-Robin, Jean-Louis Charlet, Federica Ciccolella, Ingrid De Smet, Margaret Ezell, Edoardo Fumagalli, Julia Gaisser, Lucia Gualdo Rosa, James Hankins, Andrew Laird, Marc Laureys, John Monfasani, Timothy Moore, Colette Nativel, Marianne Pade, Lisa Pon, Wayne Rebhorn, Alden Smith, Sarah Spence, Fabio Stok, Richard Thomas, and Marino Zorzi.
This book provides a new perspective on book history by exploring communities created by the production and consumption of printed material. Essays by leading scholars explore the connections between writers, printers, booksellers and readers and examine changes and continuities across the period 1500 to 1800. As well as investigating the networks behind the production and dissemination of printed material, this collection examines the ways in which readers consumed, used and shared their printed texts. By focusing on the materiality of early modern texts, contributors to this volume offer new interpretations of the history of reading, the book trade, and the book as an object in early modern Europe.
In the early modern Iberian book world, as in the European book world more broadly, most works issuing from the presses contained some form of ornamentation. The nineteen contributions presented here cast light on these visual elements—on the production and ownership of printers’ materials, and on the frequency with which these materials were exchanged and shared. A third of all items printed in the early modern Iberian world carried no imprint at all; for these items, woodblocks and engravings can assist scholars seeking to identify their place of origin or their date of publication. As importantly, decoration and illustration in early print can also reveal much about the history of the graphic arts and evolving forms of cultural representation.
Maps and Territory-Building in the Northern Indochinese Peninsula (1885-1914)
Author: Marie de Rugy
Translator: Saskia Brown
This book presents a connected history of South-East Asian borderlands, drawing on late nineteenth-century British and French geographical policies and practice. It focuses on the ‘scramble’ in Asia, when, in 1885, the British Raj incorporated Upper Burma and the French created a Protectorate in Annam-Tonkin, the Northern part of present-day Vietnam. Fought over by the imperial states and neighbouring nations, the frontier zones were fashioned and represented not only by the two European powers, but also by the Chinese Empire, the Kingdom of Siam, and the local populations. The counterpoint between the discourses produced and the cartographical practices on the ground, in the longue durée, reveals the interacting processes of territory-building in all their unpredictability.
This book is the updated version of the author’s Aux confins des empires. Cartes et constructions territoriales dans le nord de la péninsule indochinoise (1885–1914) (Paris: Éditions de la Sorbonne, 2018). It is translated by Saskia Brown, an experienced academic translator from French in the humanities and social sciences.
Author: Drew B. Thomas
Of the leading print centres in early modern Europe, Wittenberg was the only one that was not a major centre of trade, politics, or culture. This monograph examines the rise of the Wittenberg printing industry and analyses how it overtook the Empire’s leading print centres. It investigates the workshops of the four leading printers in Wittenberg during Luther’s lifetime: Nickel Schirlentz, Josef Klug, Hans Lufft, and Georg Rhau. Together, these printers conquered the German print world.
When Greece Flew Across the Alps offers a reconstruction of the status of Greek studies in the vast territory lying between Spain and Russia and Austria and the Scandinavian Peninsula, from the sixteenth to the eighteenth centuries. Although closely related to the revival of Greek studies in fifteenth-century Italy, European Hellenism acquired distinctive peculiarities due to the influence of the Reformation, the advent and spread of printing, and initiatives taken by individuals or institutions. By analyzing this important aspect of the reception of the Classics, this volume contributes to a better understanding of early modern European culture.  

Contributors: Ovanes Akopyan, Johanna Akujärvi, Gianmario Cattaneo, Federica Ciccolella, Natasha Constantinidou, Iulian Mihai Damian, Christian Gastgeber, Tua Korhonen, Han Lamers, Marianne Pade, Inmaculada Pérez Martín, Luigi-Alberto Sanchi, and Raf Van Rooy.
Focusing on literary and non-literary works alike, Interpretation and Visual Poetics in Medieval and Early Modern Texts places visual and material aspects of literary study at the center of the interpretive process. The essays in this collection explore new and traditional areas of research from hermeneutics, to codicology and history of the book, to cultures of sound and the digital humanities. They address the texts themselves, as well as their early manuscripts and subsequent printed and digital editions. The contributors collectively cover a time span of over 1000 years, and begin with the Mediterranean, focusing on texts produced in Italy and the Languedoc regions, then radiate outward to analyse the texts’ material containers (manuscripts, print, and digital editions) that are now housed worldwide.

Contributors are: Michelangelo Zaccarello, Daniel O’Sullivan, Valerio Cappozzo, Jelena Todorović, Christopher Kleinhenz, Mirko Tavoni, Isabella Magni, Francesco Marco Aresu, Dario Del Puppo, Beatrice Arduini, Giovanni Spani, Furio Brugnolo, Teodolinda Barolini, Alessandro Vettori, Marcello Ciccuto, Marco Veglia, Michael Papio, and Anthony Nussmeier.
In the early modern period, images of revolts and violence became increasingly important tools to legitimize or contest political structures. This volume offers the first in-depth analysis of how early modern people produced and consumed violent imagery and assesses its role in memory practices, political mobilization, and the negotiation of cruelty and justice.

Critically evaluating the traditional focus on Western European imagery, the case studies in this book draw on evidence from Russia, China, Hungary, Portugal, Germany, North America, and other regions. The contributors highlight the distinctions among visual cultures of violence, as well as their entanglements in networks of intensive transregional communication, early globalization, and European colonization.

Contributors include: Monika Barget, David de Boer, Nóra G. Etényi, Fabian Fechner, Joana Fraga, Malte Griesse, Alain Hugon, Gleb Kazakov, Nancy Kollmann, Ya-Chen Ma, Galina Tirnanić, and Ramon Voges.
Cihānnümā is the summa of Ottoman geography and one of the axial texts of Islamic intellectual history. Kātib Çelebi (d. 1657) sought to combine the Islamic geographical tradition with the new European discoveries, atlases and surveys. His cosmography included a comprehensive description of the regions of the world, extending westward from Japan and as far as the eastern Ottoman provinces. Ebū Bekr b. Behrām ed-Dimaşḳī (d. 1691) continued with a survey of the Arab countries and the remaining Ottoman provinces of Anatolia. İbrāhīm Müteferriḳa combined the two, with additional notes and maps of his own, in one of the earliest Ottoman printed books, Kitāb-ı Cihānnümā (1732).
Our translation includes the entire text of Müteferriḳa’s edition, distinguishing clearly between the contributions of the three authors. Based on Kātib Çelebi’s original manuscript we have made hundreds of corrections to Müteferriḳa’s text. Additional corrections are based on comparison with Kātib Çelebi’s Arabic, Persian, Turkish, Latin and Italian sources.
Print Culture at the Crossroads investigates how the spread of printing shaped a distinctive literary culture in Central Europe during the early modern period. Moving beyond the boundaries of the nation state, twenty-five scholars from over a dozen countries examine the role of the press in a region characterised by its many cultures, languages, religions, and alphabets. Antitrinitarians, Roman and Greek Catholics, Calvinists, Jews, Lutherans, and Orthodox Christians used the press to preserve and support their communities. By examining printing and patronage networks, catalogues, inventories, woodblocks, bindings, and ownership marks, this volume reveals a complicated web of connections linking printers and scholars, Jews and Christians, across Central Europe and beyond.