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Author: Litian Swen
Jesuit Mission and Submission explains how the Jesuits entered the Manchu world after the Manchus conquered Beijing in 1644. Supported by Qing court archives, the book discovers the Jesuits’ Manchu-style master-slave relationship with the Kangxi emperor. Against the backdrop of this relationship, the book reconstructs the back and forth negotiations between Kangxi and the Holy See regarding Chinese Rites Controversy (1705-1721), and shows that the Jesuits, although a group of foreign priests, had close access to Kangxi and were a trusted part of the Imperial circle. This book also redefines the rise and fall of the Christian mission in the early Qing court through key events, such as the Calendar Case and Yongzheng’s prohibition of Christianity.
Adhyāyas 96 – 112. The Varāha Cycle and the Andhaka Cycle Continued
Skandapurāṇa V presents a critical edition of Adhyāyas 92-112 from the Skandapurāṇa, with an introduction and annotated English synopsis.
The text edited in this volume includes the extensive myth of Viṣṇu’s manifestation as the Boar (Varāha), who conquers Hiraṇyākṣa and wins back the Earth for the gods; its aftermath, which involves the birth of Varāha’s son Vṛka and Skanda’s finishing of Viṣṇu’s Boar manifestation; Devī’s instructions to the goddesses about donations, fasts and penances; and the continuation of the Andhaka cycle.
The introduction addresses the incorporation of Vaiṣṇava mythology in the text, the composition and revision of Adhyāya 112 in the different recensions, and the Dharmanibandha citations of Devī’s teachings.
This collection of eighteen essays addresses critical theological and ethical issues in the book of Job: (1) Prologue: From Eden to Uz; (2) Job and His Friends: “What Provokes You that You Keep on Talking?”; (3) Job and the Priests: “Look At Me and Be Appalled;” (4) Traumatizing Job: “God Has Worn Me Out;” (5) Out of the Whirlwind: “Can You Thunder with A Voice Like God’s?”; (6) Preaching Job and Job’s God: “Listen Carefully to My Words;” (7) Epilogue: “All’s Well That Ends Well” … or Is it? The lead essay raises the question that lingers over the entire book: What are we to think of a God who is complicit in the death of seven sons and three daughters “for no reason”?
Author: Bethany Somma
This study argues that late ancient Greek and medieval Islamic philosophers interpret human desire along two frameworks in reaction to Aristotle’s philosophy. The investigation of the model dichotomy unfolds historically from the philosophy of Plotinus through the Graeco-Arabic translation movement in 8th-10th century Baghdad to 12th century al-Andalus with the philosophy of Ibn Bāǧǧa and Ibn Ṭufayl.

Diverging on desire’s inherent or non-inherent relation to the desiring subject, the two models reveal that the desire’s role can orient opposed accounts of human perfection: logically-structured demonstrative knowledge versus an ineffable witnessing of the truth. Understanding desire along these models, philosophers incorporated supra-rational aspects into philosophical accounts of the human being.
Naturrecht, Moralphilosophie und Eigentumstheorie in Kants "Naturrecht Feyerabend"
In recent decades, Kant's philosophy of law has increasingly moved into the focus of moral-philosophical discussions. In this context, the "Naturrecht Feyerabend" is of particular importance. On the one hand, it is the only surviving transcription of the lectures on natural law that Kant gave twelve times between 1767 and 1788; on the other hand, it is based on his lectures in the summer semester of 1784 and thus provides important evidence of Kant's reflections during an important phase in the development of his moral philosophy. Despite this special significance, the text has received little attention in previous research. Dieter Hüning, Stefan Klingner and Gianluca Sadun Bordoni present here a volume that emphasizes this special significance. The ten contributions in the volume ask about the relationship of "Naturrecht Feyerabend" to the tradition of natural law as well as its relationship to critical moral philosophy and the late "Doctrine of Right".

Contributors are: Manfred Baum, Franz Hespe, Philipp-Alexander Hirsch, Dieter Hüning, Stefan Klingner, Markus Kohl, Gabriel Rivero, Gianluca Sadun Bordoni, Michael Städtler, and Gideon Stiening.

Kants Rechtsphilosophie ist in den letzten Jahrzehnten wieder zunehmend in das Zentrum moralphilosophischer Diskussionen gerückt. Dabei kommt dem sogenannten „Naturrecht Feyerabend“ eine besondere Bedeutung zu. Denn einerseits stellt diese Nachschrift die einzige erhaltene Transkription der Vorlesungen über Naturrecht dar, die Kant zwischen 1767 und 1788 immerhin zwölfmal hielt; zudem geht sie andererseits auf seine Vorlesungen aus dem Sommersemester 1784 zurück und ist damit ein wichtiges Zeugnis der Überlegungen Kants aus einer besonders wichtigen Phase in der Entwicklung seiner Moralphilosophie. Trotz dieser besonderen Bedeutung wurde dem Text in der bisherigen Forschung wenig Aufmerksamkeit geschenkt. Dieter Hüning, Stefan Klingner und Gianluca Sadun Bordoni legen hier einen Band vor, der die besondere Bedeutung des „Naturrechts Feyerabend“ herausstellt. Die zehn Beiträge des Bandes fragen dabei nach dem Verhältnis des „Naturrechts Feyerabend“ zur Naturrechtstradition sowie nach dessen Verhältnis zur kritischen Moralphilosophie und zur späten „Rechtslehre“.
Domestic Practice vis-à-vis International Standards
Tadesse Simie Metekia’s Prosecution of Core Crimes in Ethiopia offers an in-depth analysis of core crimes trials in Ethiopia within the broader frame of international criminal law. This book is a result of an unprecedented data collection, a meticulous exploration of relevant national and international norms and case laws, as well as a full engagement with the existing literature on the domestic application of international criminal law.
A comparative examination of the actual trials and the manner in which Ethiopia set prosecutions of core crimes in motion, Metekia’s book is a significant achievement in terms of furthering academic knowledge and of contributing to the wider policy debates on international criminal justice and on the role of states in prosecuting atrocities.
Mursi is a Nilo-Saharan language spoken by a small group of people who live in the Lower Omo Valley, Ethiopia, and is one of the most endangered languages of the country.
Based on the fieldwork that the author conducted in beautiful villages of the Mursi community, this descriptive grammar is organized into fourteen chapters rich in examples and an appendix containing four transcribed texts. The readers are thus provided with a clear and useful tool, which constitutes and important addition to our knowledge of Mursi and of other related languages spoken in the area.
Besides being an empirical data source for linguists interested in typology and endangered language description and documentation, the grammar constitutes an invaluable gift to the speech community.
Volume Editor: Robert D. Holmstedt
This volume presents the research insights of twelve new studies by fourteen linguists examining a range of Biblical Hebrew grammatical phenomena. The contributions proceed from the second international workshop of the Biblical Hebrew Linguistics and Philology network (www.BHLaP.wordpress.com), initiated in 2017 to bring together theoretical linguists and Hebraists in order to reinvigorate the study of Biblical Hebrew grammar. Recent linguistic theory is applied to the study of the ancient language, and results in innovative insight into pausal forms, prosodic dependency, ordinal numeral syntax, ellipsis, the infinitive system, light verbs, secondary predicates, verbal semantics of the Hiphil binyan, and hybrid constructions.
Richard Kilvington was one of the most talented Oxford Calculators. His influence on late medieval philosophy and theology remains unquestionable. He made a name for himself with his logical treatise Sophismata, which was soon followed by a series of three commentaries on Aristotle’s works and a commentary on Peter Lombard’s Sentences. Richard Kilvington on the Capacity of Created Being, Infinity, and Being Simultaneously in Rome and Paris by Monika Michałowska presents a critical edition of question 3 from Kilvington’s Quaestiones super libros Sententiarum, complete with an introduction to the edition and a guide to Kilvington’s theological concepts. Kilvington’s theological question commentary enjoyed considerable popularity and became a source of continuous inspiration for Oxonian and Parisian masters.
Empowerment as a concept is making its impact on the field of literary studies. This volume shows its intricate relation to contemporary fiction in English, applying a broad range of approaches such as feminist, transcultural, and intersectional studies. Dealing with genres as diverse as dystopia, science fiction, TV adaptations, the historical novel, and immigrant fiction, this collection offers the first in-depth study of empowerment in literature. How, and to which end, do texts endow characters with power? In which ways can fiction become a tool of authorial self-empowerment? And which effects do such narratives have on readers? With this book, empowerment is put on the map of literary studies as a new, highly relevant critical concept stimulating fresh perspectives on contemporary fiction. Contributors: Peter Childs, Britta Maria Colligs, Sarah Dillon, Paul Hamann-Rose, Ralf Hertel, David Malcolm, Diana Thiesen, Eleanor Ty, Eva-Maria Windberger.