Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 23 items for :

  • Church History x
  • Upcoming Publications x
  • Just Published x
  • Search level: Titles x
Clear All
Transylvania has some of the most valuable monuments of medieval architecture in Europe. The oldest church was built in the 10th century, but most others came into being only after 1200. Later changes have considerably modified the appearance of still-standing buildings. Written sources are lacking for answers to questions about the identity of the builders and patrons. Countering the idea that only standing structures can reflect the history of medieval churches in Transylvania, this book uses archaeological sources in order to answer some of those questions and to bring to light the hidden past of many monuments.
Volume Editors: Stephan Dusil and Andreas Thier
The Decretum Gratiani is the cornerstone of medieval canon law, and the manuscript St Gallen, Stiftsbibliothek, 673 an essential witness to its evolution. The studies in this volume focus on that manuscript, providing critical insights into its genesis, linguistic features, and use of Roman Law, while evaluating its attraction to medieval readers and modern scholars.
Together, these studies offer a fascinating view on the evolution of the Decretum Gratiani, as well as granting new insights on the complex dynamics and processes by which legal knowledge was first created and then transferred in medieval jurisprudence.
Contributors are Enrique de León, Stephan Dusil, Melodie H. Eichbauer, Atria A. Larson, Titus Lenherr, Philipp Lenz, Kenneth Pennington, Andreas Thier, José Miguel Viejo-Ximénez, John C. Wei, and Anders Winroth.
A Jesuit Life in Baroque Rome
Editor: Maarten Delbeke
As a key figure in baroque Rome, Sforza Pallavicino embodies many of the apparent tensions and contradictions of his era: a man of the church deeply involved in the new science, a nobleman and courtier drawn to ascetism and theology, a controversial polemicist involved in poetry and the arts. This volume collects essays by specialists in the fields and disciplines that cover Pallavicino’s activities as a scholar, author and Jesuit, and situate him within the Roman cultural, political and social elite of his times. Through the figure of Pallavicino, an image of baroque Rome emerges that challenges historical periodisations and disciplinary boundaries.

Contributors include: Silvia Apollonio, Stefan Bauer, Eraldo Bellini, Chiara Catalano, Maarten Delbeke, Maria Pia Donato, Federica Favino, Irene Fosi, Sven K. Knebel, Alessandro Metlica, Anselm Ramelow, Pietro Giulio Riga, and Jon R. Snyder
Band 3 der Paderborner Gesangbuchgeschichte 1821–1872 öffnet den Blick auf die Entwicklung und Rezeption der Gesangbücher und Kirchenlieder der Katholischen Aufklärung sowie der Restauration und zeigt Zusammenhänge zwischen Geistes-, Kirchen-, Text- und Frömmigkeitsgeschichte. Die Gesangbuchgeschichte umfasst die beiden Teile des Großbistums Paderborn im 19. Jahrhundert: den Westteil (altes Fürstbistum Paderborn und ehemaliges Herzogtum Westfalen) und den Ostteil (Kommissariat Magdeburg, Kommissariat Heiligenstadt, Geistliches Gericht Erfurt). Das digitale Begleitmaterial der Untersuchung enthält die Dokumentation des Liedguts der Paderborner Gesangbücher 1600–1872. Die Fülle des Materials wurde analysiert unter Mitarbeit der Historikerin Dr. Monika Lahrkamp und des Theologen und Historikers Prof. Dr. Hermann-Josef Schmalor.
A Small Neutral State’s Visions of Modern War
Author: Wim Klinkert
Total War was the core concept around which military thought revolved during the interwar period. Total War was also a multifaceted, confusing concept that affected both civilian and military life. How did small states conceive of their place in such a destructive war? Did they close their eyes, relying on international law to protect them, or did they seek creative solutions?
This book examines how Dutch officers, in the shadow of three great powers, considered their military future, analysing the impact of European military ideas on a small state. This approach offers a new perspective on interwar dealing with assumptions about a new world war.
Rituals and ceremonies played a significant role in medieval society by both establishing continuity with previous generations and their legacy, and temporarily allowing individuals to step out of their everyday routine. This is true for local communities, villages, convents, castles and cities, but also, for kingdoms and empires. Despite its importance, ritual in medieval Central Europe has not yet been studied to a great extent.

In this volume, seven contributions deal with various examples and aspects of rituals in the late medieval Bohemian lands. The individual contributions explore particular rituals (coronation, wedding, funeral) or environments (cities, nobility, court, church). They share innovative interpretations and newly elaborated sources.

Contributors are: Antonín Kalous, František Šmahel, Martin Čapský, Martin Nodl, Robert Šimůnek, Tomáš Borovský, and Václav Žůrek.
The medieval dissenters known as ‘Waldenses’, named after their first founder, Valdes of Lyons, have long attracted careful scholarly study, especially from specialists writing in Italian, French and German. Waldenses were found across continental Europe, from Aragon to the Baltic and East-Central Europe. They were long-lived, resilient, and diverse. They lived in a special relationship with the prevailing Catholic culture, making use of the Church’s services but challenging its claims.

Many Waldenses are known mostly, or only, because of the punitive measures taken by inquisitors and the Church hierarchy against them. This volume brings for the first time a wide-ranging, multi-authored interpretation of the medieval Waldenses to an English-language readership, across Europe and over the four centuries until the Reformation.

Contributors: Marina Benedetti, Peter Biller, Luciana Borghi Cedrini, Euan Cameron, Jacques Chiffoleau, Albert de Lange, Andrea Giraudo, Franck Mercier, Grado Giovanni Merlo, Georg Modestin, Martine Ostorero, Damian J. Smith, Claire Taylor, and Kathrin Utz Tremp.
Author: David W. Music
The hymns of Isaac Watts are a remarkable blend of biblical, theological, liturgical, poetic, musical, and practical dimensions, some of which have seldom been touched upon in previous studies of the hymn writer. In this book, you will find analyses of Watts’s texts from each of these perspectives. As shown by this study, it is not only these individual factors but their combination that made Watts’s hymns innovative but also effective and long lasting in his own time—and that makes many of them still useful and widely sung today.
Clément d’Alexandrie (150-215 Ap. J.-C.) est l’un des penseurs les plus brillants des premiers siècles chrétiens. Son enseignement, tout autant pétri de la Bible que de la pensée grecque, nous révèle la nature des débats aux premières heures de l’expansion du christianisme. Ce livre aborde un sujet peu étudié à ce jour, à savoir sa pensée sur l’Église. C’est pourtant un sujet récurent de ses ouvrages, où il réfléchit longuement sur l’Église à partir de l’être et la mission du Logos divin. L’analyse du discours de Clément sur l’Église permet donc de revisiter les intuitions principales de sa christologie tout en apportant un éclairage sur sa perception de l’identité chrétienne à une époque où celle-ci est encore en construction.

Clement of Alexandria (AD 150-215) is one of the most brilliant thinkers of the early Christian centuries. His teaching, steeped as much in the Bible as in Greek thought, reveals to us the nature of the debates in the early days of the expansion of Christianity. This book deals with a subject little studied to this day, namely his thoughts on the Church. Yet it is a recurring subject in his works, where he reflects at length on the Church from the point of view of the being and the mission of the divine Logos. Analysis of Clement’s discourse on the Church therefore makes it possible to revisit the main intuitions of his Christology while shedding light on his perception of Christian identity at a time when it is still under construction.
Martín Del Río (1551-1608) was a remarkably learned Jesuit scholar. His prolific output includes six volumes of Investigations into Magic which sought to be the last word on magic, witchcraft, and allied subjects such as divination and superstition, and a detailed manual of advice for judges and confessors engaged in combatting what was seen at the time as a dangerous threat to the spiritual life of humanity in this world and the next. First published in 1599-1600, Investigations was heralded as a major contribution to the armoury of the Counter-Reformation, and went through several editions, the last appearing in 1747.