Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 23 items for :

  • Classical Studies x
  • Upcoming Publications x
  • Search level: Titles x
Clear All
Sexual violence is one of the oldest and most difficult problems of humankind. Many of the “love stories” in Classical Greek and Roman Myth are tales of rape, a fact that is often casually glossed over in both popular and scholarly treatments of these narratives. Through a careful selection of stories, this book provides a deep exploration of rape in Classical Myth as well as in the works of art and literature that have responded to it through the millennia. The volume offers an essential reading for anyone who wishes to understand sexual violence from different perspectives and through an interdisciplinary approach, which includes Trauma Theory and Evolutionary Psychology.
Volume Editor: Juhana Toivanen
The trilogy Forms of Representation in the Aristotelian Tradition investigates how Aristotle and his ancient and medieval successors understood the relation between the external world and the human mind. It gives an equal footing to the three most influential linguistic traditions – Greek, Latin, and Arabic – and offers insightful interpretations of historical theories of perception, dreaming, and thinking. This first volume focuses on sense perception and discusses philosophical questions concerning the external senses, their classification, and their functioning, from Aristotle to Brentano.
The trilogy Forms of Representation in the Aristotelian Tradition investigates how Aristotle and his ancient and medieval successors understood the relation between the external world and the human mind. It gives an equal footing to the three most influential linguistic traditions – Greek, Latin, and Arabic – and offers insightful interpretations of historical theories of perception, dreaming, and thinking. This final volume focuses on intellectual operations and analyses some of the most exciting issues pertaining to the conceptual representation of the external world. The contributions cover the historical traditions and their impact on contemporary philosophy of mind.
The trilogy Forms of Representation in the Aristotelian Tradition investigates how Aristotle and his ancient and medieval successors understood the relation between the external world and the human mind. It gives an equal footing to the three most influential linguistic traditions – Greek, Latin, and Arabic – and offers insightful interpretations of historical theories of perception, dreaming, and thinking. This second volume focuses on dreaming and analyses some of the most prominent problems connected to dreams as representations. The contributions in this volume address the core Aristotelian texts and their reception, up to and including contemporary scientific discourse on dreaming.
Cassius Dio (c. 160–c. 230) is a familiar name to Roman historians, but still an enigmatic one. His text has shaped our understanding of his own period and earlier eras, but basic questions remain about his Greek and Roman cultural identities and his literary and intellectual influences. Contributors to this volume read Dio against different backgrounds including the politics of the Severan court, the cultural milieu of the Second Sophistic and Roman traditions of historiography and political theory. Dio emerges as not just a recounter of events, but a representative of his times in all their complexity.
What does it mean to be a leader? This collection of seventeen studies breaks new ground in our understanding of leadership in ancient Rome by re-evaluating the difference between those who began a political action and those who followed or reacted. In a significant change of approach, this volume shifts the focus from archetypal “leaders” to explore the potential for individuals of different ranks, social statuses, ages, and genders to seize initiative. In so doing, the contributors provide new insight into the ways in which the ability to initiate communication, invent solutions, and prompt others to act resonated in critical moments of Roman history.
Author: Andreas Heil
This monograph examines the literary representation of encounters between the living and the dead in Homer and the Roman epic poets of the early imperial period. The focus is on one particular situation: a witness to the afterlife (e.g. Odysseus or the Sibyl) who narrates encounters with the dead that he or she cannot (it would appear) actually have seen. This insufficiently studied and intriguing motif, namely seemingly impossible eye-witness testimony, can already be traced in Homer and then with variations in Vergil, the Culex poet, Lucan, Silius Italicus, and Statius.

Die vorliegende Monographie untersucht die literarische Gestaltung von Begegnungen zwischen Lebenden und Toten bei Homer und den römischen Epikern der frühen Kaiserzeit. Im Mittelpunkt steht dabei eine besondere Situation: Ein Jenseitszeuge (z.B. Odysseus oder die Sibylle) berichtet von Begegnungen mit Toten, die er oder sie (scheinbar) nicht gesehen haben kann. Dieses unzureichend erforschte und faszinierende Motiv, nämlich die scheinbar unmögliche Autopsie, lässt sich bereits bei Homer und dann in Variationen bei Vergil, dem Culex-Dichter, Lucan, Silius Italicus und Statius nachweisen.
By applying a stylistic analysis within a systemic-functional linguistic framework, this study argues that Luke's construal of the Jerusalem Council in Acts 15 and its co-thematic passages attempt to persuade Jewish believers of Luke's audience not to separate from multi-ethnic churches, a goal that is accomplished through subverting the value orientations of a prominent Noahic tradition within Second Temple Jewish literature that promotes strict Jewish isolation from Gentiles. As a result, this study breaks fresh methodological ground in the linguistic study on the New Testament and also advances critical scholarship on the book of Acts.
According to Raúl González Salinero, the plurality of religious expressions within Judaism prior to the predominance of the rabbinical current disproves the assumption according to which some Jewish customs and precepts (especially the Sabbath) prevented Jews from joining the Roman army without renouncing their ancestral culture. The military exemption occasionally granted to the Jews by the Roman authorities was compatible with their voluntary enlistment (as it was in the Hellenistic armies) in order to obtain Roman citizenship. As the sources attest, Judaism did not pose any insurmountable obstacle to integration of the Jews into the Roman world. They achieved a noteworthy presence in the Roman army by the fourth century CE, at which time the Church’s influence over imperial power led to their exclusion from the militia armata.
Volume 1 of the two-volume set MITS 56: In 1508, Johannes Trithemius, the Black Abbot, dedicated his Polygraphia, a treatise on writing in ciphers, to Emperor Maximilian I, personally handing over an elaborate autograph. Unlike the editio princeps, which was to be printed a decade later, the manuscript retains the arcane and mysterious tone of the bibliophile scholar’s earlier works on the subject. This book offers the first critical edition and translation of this first version, together with an extensive commentary illuminating the numerous obscure allusions, the impressive literary knowledge of its author, and the genesis of the mechanisms discussed.