Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 183 items for :

  • Upcoming Publications x
  • Search level: Titles x
Clear All
Edited by Marine Carrin (Editor-in-Chief) and Michel Boivin, Marine Carrin, Paul Hockings, Raphaël Rousseleau, Tanka Subha, Harald Tambs-Lyche, Gérard Toffin (Associate editors)
Brill’s Encyclopedia of the Religions of the Indigenous People of South Asia Online strives to reflect the diversity of indigenous cultures of South Asia with its many language groups and religious traditions. Religion is taken in a broad sense and includes aspects of morality, symbolism, identity formation, environmental concerns, and art. The approach is contemporary and not a reconstruction of an anterior state, though this does not exclude talking about historical processes.
Editor: Seokwoo Lee
The Encyclopedia is also available online.

Incorporating the work of numerous leading scholars, the Encyclopedia of Public International Law in Asia provides a detailed description of the practice and implementation of international law in various Asian states. The Encyclopedia covers the introduction of Western international law and the resulting shift from the older Asian order; the development of modern international law; and the impact that all of this has had on Asian states.

Offered online and in print as three geographically-organized volumes – Northeast Asia, Southeast Asia, and Central and South Asia – this reference work provides valuable information for all those interested in the historical development, implementation, and application of international law in Asia. Although there is general acknowledgement of the great variety of cultures among Asian countries, strong themes of familiarity, mutual understanding, coherence, and solidarity persists among them as a result of the numerous mutual cultural and religious contacts and interconnections that developed over the course of centuries. This examination of international law and its application in Asia reveals the shared history of the continent, as well as its unique development in each Asian state.

Each jurisdiction included in the Encyclopedia follows a standard structure for the broadest comparative advantage and starts with a Country Snapshot (Date of Independence, Date of Admission to the United Nations, Geographical Size, Population, Demographic Information, Form of Government, System of Law), followed by a State Report Overview (Executive summary of state report, Key highlights of unique state practice).

Coverage of the jurisdictions include the following items/chapters (where applicable):

THE STATE IN INTERNATIONAL LAW
History and Theoretical Approach of [The State] in International Law
Statehood & Sovereignty
Territory & Jurisdiction
Sovereign/State Immunity
State Responsibility
Relationship between International & Domestic Law

INSTITUTIONAL RELATIONS
Treaties
Diplomatic & Consular Relations
International & Regional Organisations
Individuals & Non-State Actors
International Relations & Cooperation
Settlement of Disputes

PARTICULAR INTERNATIONAL LAW SUBJECTS
International Economic Law
International Environmental Law
Law of the Sea
Air Law & Law of Outer Space
Human Rights
International Humanitarian Law
International Criminal Law
Use or Threat of Force
Author: David Challis
Foreign Currency Volatility and the Market for French Modernist Art examines how the collapse of the French franc in the decades following the First World War activated powerful ‘push’ and ‘pull’ economic forces that compelled French art collectors to monetise their collections while simultaneously elevating the purchasing power of international art collectors. These factors are shown to have played a significant, and previously under-recognised role, in the large-scale translocation of French modernist art that radically accelerated its commercial and critical reception across the globe and positioned it at the apex of the newly established hierarchy of modern art.
Widely read as school texts, the comedies by the Roman dramatist Terence have come down to us in hundreds of medieval copies. Fourteen of the manuscripts produced between 800 and 1200 were given some kind of illustration. In this volume, Beatrice Radden Keefe explores the semiotics of the imagery found in the earliest illustrated Terence manuscripts, and its relationship to the iconography of comedy and theatre from antiquity. She examines six further manuscripts to show how later illustrators abandoned this imagery to varying degrees, finding new emphases and creating new layers of meaning. Illustrators of Terence, it is demonstrated here, brought a range of interests to illustrating the comedies, clarifying their narrative, incorporating social commentary and moralisation, and linking them with Christian allegorical traditions.
Decoding the Language of Metaphor in the Book of Proverbs
Proverbs is a poetic book full of images and metaphors, many of which are often obscure and enigmatic. In this volume, Rotasperti offers a contribution to the understanding of figurative language in Proverbs by looking at the grammatical and social contexts in which many of the book’s metaphors appear. The brief introduction explains the process and methodological assumptions used for identifying metaphors. The study then continues with a lexical review of four semantic categories: the body, urban fabric, nature and animals. The result of this survey is a deep analysis of several key metaphors that looks at their composition, structure, and interpretation.
Cihānnümā is the summa of Ottoman geography and one of the axial texts of Islamic intellectual history. Kātib Çelebi (d. 1657) sought to combine the Islamic geographical tradition with the new European discoveries, atlases and surveys. His cosmography included a comprehensive description of the regions of the world, extending westward from Japan and as far as the eastern Ottoman provinces. Ebū Bekr b. Behrām ed-Dimaşḳī (d. 1691) continued with a survey of the Arab countries and the remaining Ottoman provinces of Anatolia. İbrāhīm Müteferriḳa combined the two, with additional notes and maps of his own, in one of the earliest Ottoman printed books, Kitāb-ı Cihānnümā (1732).
Our translation includes the entire text of Müteferriḳa’s edition, distinguishing clearly between the contributions of the three authors. Based on Kātib Çelebi’s original manuscript we have made hundreds of corrections to Müteferriḳa’s text. Additional corrections are based on comparison with Kātib Çelebi’s Arabic, Persian, Turkish, Latin and Italian sources.