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Dialogi tres in Lactentium

Critical Latin Edition, English Translation, Introduction, and Notes
Antonio da Rho’s Three Dialogues against Lactantius (1445) followed the lead of Jerome and Augustine yet went well beyond patristic concerns. During the Middle Ages Lactantius’ works, while largely neglected, had enjoyed moments of intense interest and study. From the death of Lactantius (325) to his broad Quattrocento recovery, many profound cultural and intellectual shifts had transpired. Consequently, Rho’s dialogues engage topics arising from scholastic and other debates in jurisprudence, cosmology, astrology, geography, philosophy, and theology. He was convinced that insights from these fields would elucidate errors of Lactantius that his readers had overlooked. This reveals much about the cultural and intellectual developments that shaped readers’ efforts to recover, comprehend, and define Lactantius as an author. Significantly, the list of Lactantius’ errors discussed in the dialogues was printed with nearly every edition of Lactantius through the sixteenth century and beyond.
The Far Right from ‘Post-Fascism’ to Trumpism
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In this second volume of Capital, Race and Space, Richard Saull offers an international historical sociology of the Western far-right from the end of World War II to its contemporary manifestations in Trumpism and Brexit. Focusing on its international causal dimensions, Saull draws on the theory of uneven and combined development to provide a distinct and original explanation of the evolution and mutations of the ‘post-fascist’ far-right.

Despite the transformed geopolitical context of capitalist development after 1945 – with decolonization and the end inter-imperial rivalry – the far-right continued to be intimately connected to the consolidation of the anti-communist liberal order. Thereafter, the far-right also formed an important, if contradictory, element within the neoliberal historical bloc that emerged in the 1980s and has been the main ideo-political beneficiary of the 2007-8 neoliberal crisis.
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Capitalism and COVID-19: Time to Make a Democratic New World Order proposes the deepening of democracy in a post-capitalist world. It suggests that humans should be placed back in nature and nature back in humans and argues for a global environmental movement. The book maintains that the free market should serve people and planet – instead of people and planet serving the free market. It motivates for enabling the state in leading the transition to a post-capitalist world. A post-capitalist society should ensure planetary and peoples’ well-being together with economic well-being. Economic science in its current ideological form should be revisited. Exiting capitalism requires the unity of workers of all countries. Capitalism and COVID-19: Time to Make a Democratic New World Order calls for reimagining and recreating the best of all possible worlds for present and future generations. In the final analysis Noel Chellan predicts and maintains that capitalism too shall pass!
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Why do people wage war? How can wars be won? How has warfare been an engine of change for human civilization—for better and for worse? In this book Paul Schuurman shows how some of the best Western minds between 1650 and 1900 tried to answer these questions in an epoch when European developments became a matter of global concern. In eight wide-ranging chapters he discusses the key concepts that philosophers and generals of this era developed to grasp and influence the dramatic and horrific phenomenon of war. Their concepts remain fresh and relevant down to the present day.
Volume Editors: and
No studies currently exist on consuls and consulates (often dismissed as lowly figures in the diplomatic process) in the Cold War. Research into the work of these overlooked 'poor relations' offers the chance of new perspectives in the field of Cold War studies, exploring their role in representing their country’s interests in far flung and unexpected places and their support for particular communities of fellow nationals and itinerant travellers in difficulties. These unnoticed actors on the international stage played far more complicated roles than one generally imagines.
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Contributors are: Tina Tamman, David Schriffl, Ariane Knuesel , Lori Maguire, Laurent Cesari, Sue Onslow, Pedro Aires Oliveira, David Lee, and Marek Hańderek.
The Song Dynasty Making of China’s Greatest Poet
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Irreducible to conventional labels usually applied to him, the Tang poet Du Fu (712–770) both defined and was defined by the literary, intellectual, and socio-political cultures of the Song dynasty (960–1279).
Jue Chen not only argues in his work that Du Fu was constructed according to particular literary and intellectual agendas of Song literati but also that conventional labels applied to Du Fu do not accurately represent this construction campaign. He also discusses how Du Fu’s image as the greatest poet sheds unique light on issues that can deepen our understanding of the subtleties in the poetic culture of Song China.
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Jesuits usually joined the Society in their mid-teens, spent a decade receiving further education, and their first assignment was likely to be teaching and ministry in Europe. For many of them, however, the East Indies appealed more to their desire for novelty, danger, and martyrdom. This book considers thousands of Indipetae for the first time as a coherent and self-concluded work written by a scholar with a long-time experience with them. It demonstrates the importance of apparently secondary and less-used sources (like the generals’ replies) in order to provide a more exhaustive picture of the Society of Jesus and its members’ dreams and aspirations.
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When Francis of Assisi started to use his family’s resources for religious purposes, his father took him to court. It was there that Francis dispossessed himself of everything and began a new life that soon inspired others to follow.
Within a century, members of this Order of Friars Minor were among the first to dedicate complete treatises to discussions of buying, selling, and the whole of human exchange that is known as economics. The natural question to ask—and the one proposed here—is whether there might be a connection between the two, between Franciscan poverty and Franciscan economic thought?
A Critical Edition and Translation of Evagrius Ponticus’ Kephalaia Gnostika in Arabic
In the late fourth century, the early Christian monk and author Evagrius Ponticus wrote his magnum opus in Greek—entitled Kephalaia Gnostika (“Gnostic Chapters”)—a spiritual treatise on ascetic contemplation and unity with God. After Evagrius’ death, however, his theology attracted controversy, and many of his writings were suppressed or destroyed. As a result, complete copies of this important work principally survived only in Syriac translations and an Armenian adaptation, until the recent discovery of two Arabic copies at the so-called Monastery of the Syrians in Egypt. The present volume represents the first-ever critical edition and translation of the Kephalaia Gnostika in that language.
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Ibn Ibrāhīm al-Dukkālī’s Historical Chronicle, edited and translated by Norman Cigar, is a valuable contemporary manuscript source from Morocco’s poorly documented and seldom-studied mid-eighteenth century, a period marked by weak rulers and conflicts, but also a golden age for local political actors and the autonomous power centers in the cities. As a well-placed observer and active participant in events in his native city of Fes, al-Dukkālī provides unique data that helps us address key questions about cities in the Muslim world raised in multiple disciplines, such as whether cities could be considered communities or were simply an agglomeration of disparate elements, and to what extent cities enjoyed autonomy in their relations with the central government, and in what sense they were “Islamic.”