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A Computable Approach to Criminal Procedure Law
The volume presents an innovative analysis of defence rights in EU criminal proceedings through the lens of a computational approach to the law. This multi-level research tackles both EU law and national legislation, as well as case-law on defence rights in criminal proceedings.
The comparative analysis on procedural safeguards is integrated by legal informatics, that led to the translation into computable language of the relevant EU and national legislation.
Such multidisciplinary approach allows, through a semiautomated technology, to better highlight potentially uncovered deficit of the normative texts, and to enhance comparative analysis of legal systems.
The breakthrough perspective brings a novel viewpoint to the debate on criminal procedure rights, shading light on the potential emerging from the interaction between criminal law and technology.
The speed of technological change is demonstrated not least by the new military technologies that are in use or are currently being developed. For example, the use of remote-controlled and semi-autonomous weapons systems has long been standard in the armed forces, and advances in artificial intelligence mean that more "decision-making " can be expected to be transferred to the machines used by the military. But not everything that is technologically possible is ethically justifiable.
This volume, which brings together contributions to an annual conference of the European Chapter of the International Society for Military Ethics, attempts to address the ethical and legal problems posed by emerging military technologies. In a number of exciting essays, internationally renowned researchers present their insights.
Democratic societies expect their armed forces to act in a morally responsible way, which seems a fair expectation given the fact that they entrust their armed forces with the monopoly of violence. However, this is not as straightforward and unambiguous as it sounds. Present-day military practices show that political assignments, social and cultural contexts, innovative technologies and organisational structures, present military personnel with questions and dilemma’s that can have far-reaching consequences for all involved – not in the last place for the soldiers themselves. A thorough training and education, in which critical thinking is developed and stimulated, seems therefore a necessary condition for morally responsible behaviour. This book aims to contribute to this form of ‘reflective practitioning’ in military practice.
The Yearbook of Polar Law covers a wide variety of law and policy topics relating to the Arctic and the Antarctic, and even the Third Pole. Many of the articles draw on presentations made at the annual Symposiums on Polar Law. The Editors-in-Chief are Gudmundur Alfredsson of the Stefansson Arctic Institute in Akureyri and the China University of Political Science and Law in Beijing, Julia Jabour of the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies, University of Tasmania, Timo Koivurova of the Arctic Centre, University of Lapland, and Akiho Shibata of the Polar Cooperation Research Centre, Kobe University.

Articles published in the Yearbook are peer reviewed, unless otherwise noted. The Yearbook will also carry book reviews and occasional news stories.

The topics covered in the Yearbook include:
- human rights issues, such as autonomy, self-government and self-determination, the rights of indigenous peoples to land and natural resources, cultural rights and cultural heritage, and indigenous traditional knowledge
- local, national and corporate governance issues
- environmental law, climate change, security and human rights implications of climate change, protected areas and species, and biodiversity
- regulatory and management agreements and arrangements for marine environments, marine mammals, fisheries conservation and other biological/mineral/oil resources
- jurisdictional and other issues re the exploration, exploitation and shipping of oil, gas and minerals
- law of the sea, the retreating sea ice, and continental shelf claims
- trade law, potential shipping lines through the northwest and northeast passages, maritime law and transportation law
- territorial claims and border disputes on both land and at sea
- peace and security, and dispute settlement
- the roles and actual involvement of international organizations in the polar regions, such as the Arctic Council, the Nordic Council, the International Whaling Commission, the European Union, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, and the United Nations, and
- the activities of NGOs, think tanks and academic institutions

The papers in this volume are principally based on presentations at the Polar Law Symposium, held online with logistical support by the Kobe University Polar Cooperation Research Centre (PCRC), in November 2020.
Selected Essays on Children's Rights
Author: Michael Freeman
For decades, Professor Michael Freeman has without doubt been one of the world's most infuential scholars in international children's rights. His scholarship has been at the forefront of the field and has helped shape many of the developments within it. This collection offers the reader a thought-provoking snapshot of some of his most seminal essays, written and/or published over the past 30 years. Together they highlight above all the interdisciplinary nature of the issues he discusses. Legal doctrinal questions that make the case for recognising that children have rights are of course discussed. But aspects of moral and political philosophy are dealt with as well, in addition to, among other other disciplines, history, theology, psychology and antropology.
In this book Siu Lang Carrillo Yap compares the land and forest rights of Amazonian indigenous peoples from Bolivia, Brazil, Ecuador and Peru, and analyses these rights in the context of international law, property law theory, and forest and soil sciences. Within this scope and against the historical background, the recent interrelations between the Amazonian indigenous peoples’ land, forest and community forest management rights and their importance for the self-determination of indigenous peoples in the Amazonian region are examined.

Through bringing together international law with national law, natural resources law with property law and law with natural sciences, the author sheds new light on the complex topic of indigenous peoples’ rights closely entwined with the conservation of the Amazonian rainforest.
The Yearbook of International Disaster Law aims to represent a hub for critical debate in this emerging area of research and policy and to foster the interest of academics, practitioners, stakeholders and policy-makers on legal and institutional issues relevant to all forms of natural, technological and human-made hazards. This Yearbook primarily addresses the international law dimension of relevant topics, alongside important regional and national dimensions relevant for further development of legal and policy initiatives. In the Thematic Section of Volume 3, entitled ‘Health and International Disaster Law’ distinguished scholars debate legal and institutional implications of the Covid-19 pandemic and health emergencies in relation to several emerging or neglected topics.