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The imperial convent of St. Servatius at Quedlinburg (founded in 936) was one of the wealthiest, most prestigious, and most politically powerful religious houses of medieval Germany, subject only to the authority of the emperor and the pope. This is the first English-language volume to provide an introduction to this important female religious community.

The twelve essays by a team of international scholars address an array of topics in Quedlinburg’s medieval history, with a particular focus on how the Quedlinburg community of learned aristocratic women used architecture and the visual arts to assert the abbey's illustrious history, ongoing political importance, and cultural significance.

Contributors are: Clemens Bley, Karen Blough, Shirin Fozi, Tobias Gärtner, Eliza Garrison, Evan A. Gatti, G. Ulrich Großmann, Annie Krieg, Manfred Mehl, Katharina Ulrike Mersch, Christian Popp, Helene Scheck, and Adam R. Stead.
Sankt Gallen, Stiftsbibliothek, 673 and Its Context
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The Decretum Gratiani is the cornerstone of medieval canon law, and the manuscript St Gallen, Stiftsbibliothek, 673 an essential witness to its evolution. The studies in this volume focus on that manuscript, providing critical insights into its genesis, linguistic features, and use of Roman Law, while evaluating its attraction to medieval readers and modern scholars.
Together, these studies offer a fascinating view on the evolution of the Decretum Gratiani, as well as granting new insights on the complex dynamics and processes by which legal knowledge was first created and then transferred in medieval jurisprudence.
Contributors are Enrique de León, Stephan Dusil, Melodie H. Eichbauer, Atria A. Larson, Titus Lenherr, Philipp Lenz, Kenneth Pennington, Andreas Thier, José Miguel Viejo-Ximénez, John C. Wei, and Anders Winroth.
The sixteenth century saw the world as being mortally threatened by Satan who was encouraged by the widespread popularity of magic and other occult practices. Church and society struck back to defend people from this tidal wave of wickedness. Del Río’s panoramic and detailed treatise provided a powerful weapon in that battle. Far from dry scholarship, however, ‘Investigations’ is an engaging, fascinating, earnest conversation between Del Río and his readers and a major contribution to understanding key aspects of everyday sixteenth century behaviour and the problem of evil.
The sixteenth century saw the world as being mortally threatened by Satan who was encouraged by the widespread popularity of magic and other occult practices. Church and society struck back to defend people from this tidal wave of wickedness. Del Río’s panoramic and detailed treatise provided a powerful weapon in that battle. Far from dry scholarship, however, ‘Investigations’ is an engaging, fascinating, earnest conversation between Del Río and his readers and a major contribution to understanding key aspects of everyday sixteenth century behaviour and the problem of evil.
The sixteenth century saw the world as being mortally threatened by Satan who was encouraged by the widespread popularity of magic and other occult practices. Church and society struck back to defend people from this tidal wave of wickedness. Del Río’s panoramic and detailed treatise provided a powerful weapon in that battle. Far from dry scholarship, however, ‘Investigations’ is an engaging, fascinating, earnest conversation between Del Río and his readers and a major contribution to understanding key aspects of everyday sixteenth century behaviour and the problem of evil.
The sixteenth century saw the world as being mortally threatened by Satan who was encouraged by the widespread popularity of magic and other occult practices. Church and society struck back to defend people from this tidal wave of wickedness. Del Río’s panoramic and detailed treatise provided a powerful weapon in that battle. Far from dry scholarship, however, ‘Investigations’ is an engaging, fascinating, earnest conversation between Del Río and his readers and a major contribution to understanding key aspects of everyday sixteenth century behaviour and the problem of evil.
In 1602 the German nation of the University of Orléans decided to separate the registration of new members from the texte des rapports in the Livres des procurateurs, 1444-1602. The registres matricules that were subsequently used show that in the seventeenth century many young people from a great diversity of European countries found their way to Orléans. Apart from the genuine students, many were 'tourists', though considered by the authorities as 'étudiants universitaires'.
Joining the German nation offered the newly enrolled the privilege of being part of a university community that had traditionally been favoured by the French kings with special privileges, such as royal protection in time of war and, more importantly, freedom of religion. A majority of these student-tourists came from the nobility or from urban patrician families.
Music, Images, and Drama to Promote the Reformation
Martin Luther was the architect and engineer of the Protestant Reformation, which transformed Germany five hundred years ago. In Martin Luther and the Arts, Andreas Loewe and Katherine Firth elucidate Luther’s theory and practice, demonstrating the breadth, flexibility and rigour of Luther’s use of the arts to reach audiences and convince them of his Reformation message using a range of strategies, including music, images and drama alongside sermons, polemical tracts, and his new translation of the Bible into German.

Extensively based on German and English sources, including often neglected aspects of Luther’s own writings, Loewe and Firth offer a valuable survey for theologians, historians, art historians, musicologists and literary studies scholars interested in interdisciplinary comparisons of Luther’s work across the arts.
This book solves the long-standing mystery of a Christian monastery near Samarkand, seen and described by two Arab travellers in the tenth century. Despite several attempts made since the 1890s, its precise location had never been established. The first part covers the quest, the find, and the archaeological excavations’ results. Then the author proceeds to search for a mediaeval Christian enclave near modern Tashkent, which appears to have been washed away by a river that changed its course over centuries.
Apart from the Christians, the book also touches upon the Manichaeans, Buddhists, Zoroastrians and other Sogdians, their languages, faiths, and material remnants.
Stories of Pentecostal conversion and church growth in Roma communities are prolific across Europe but how does conversion impact daily lives in the context of economic hardship and social marginalization? In fact, Roma Pentecostal life stories from Croatia and Serbia reveal both resilience and suffering, and consequently reveal the struggle of lived faith amidst formidable challenges. In what ways, then, has a new Pentecostal identity shifted relationships, thinking, and behaviour? This ethnography explores the ways in which these Roma Pentecostals incorporate their faith in their daily lives through analysing their life stories in conjunction with their socio-cultural contexts and Pentecostal theology.