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Volume Editors: and
Christian-Muslim Relations, a Bibliographical History 21 (CMR 21), covering Southern Europe, in the period 1800-1914, is a further volume in a general history of relations between the two faiths from the 7th century to the early 20th century. It comprises a series of introductory essays and the main body of detailed entries. These treat all the works, surviving or lost, that have been recorded. They provide biographical details of the authors, descriptions and assessments of the works themselves, and complete accounts of manuscripts, editions, translations and studies. The result of collaboration between numerous new and leading scholars, CMR 21, along with the other volumes in this series, is intended as a fundamental tool for research in Christian-Muslim relations.

Section Editors:Ines Aščerić-Todd, Clinton Bennett, Luis F. Bernabé Pons, Jaco Beyers, Emanuele Colombo, Lejla Demiri, Martha T. Frederiks, David D. Grafton, Stanisław Grodź, Alan M. Guenther, Vincenzo Lavenia, Arely Medina, Diego Melo Carrasco, Alain Messaoudi, Gordon Nickel, Claire Norton, Reza Pourjavady, Douglas Pratt, Charles Ramsey, Peter Riddell, Umar Ryad, Cornelia Soldat, Charles Tieszen, Carsten Walbiner, Catherina Wenzel.
Spirit-Writing in Chinese History and Society
Few religious innovations have shaped Chinese history like the emergence of spirit-writing during the Song dynasty.
From a divinatory technique it evolved into a complex ritual practice used to transmit messages and revelations from the Gods. This resulted in the production of countless religious scriptures that now form an essential corpus, widely venerated and recited to this day, that is still largely untapped by research.
Using historical and ethnographic approaches, this volume for the first time offers a comprehensive overview of the history of spirit-writing, examining its evolution over a millennium, the practices and technologies used, and the communities involved.
Volume Editors: and
This volume brings together thirteen case studies devoted to the establishment, growth, and demise of holy places in Muslim societies, thereby providing a global look on Muslim engagement with the emplacement of the holy. Combining research by historians, art historians, archaeologists, and historians of religion, the volume bridges different approaches to the study of the concept of “holiness” in Muslim societies. It addresses a wide range of geographical regions, from Indonesia and India to Morocco and Senegal, highlighting the strategies implemented in the making and unmaking of holy places in Muslim lands.

Contributors: David N. Edwards, Claus-Peter Haase, Beatrice Hendrich, Sara Kuehn, Zacharie Mochtari de Pierrepont, Sara Mondini, Harry Munt, Luca Patrizi, George Quinn, Eric Ross, Ruggero Vimercati Sanseverino, Ethel Sara Wolper.
Thomas Hobbes and the Theology of the Old Covenant in Early Modern England
Covenant theology was a popular and controversial topic in early modern England. In particular, the biblical old covenant with Moses generated tremendous theological and political debates during the years of the English Civil Wars. And yet, the disciplinary boundaries of historical theology and the history of political thought make it hard to understand why early modern preachers and philosophers wrestled over this topic with such vigour. This interdisciplinary historical theological study explains the development of the covenant theology in the major works of Thomas Hobbes and his contemporaries, including Bishop Robert Sanderson and the puritan and presbyterian circles of the Westminster Assembly.
Author:
This study of the pioneer mission to the Zulu people differs from others in South African mission studies by offering a more nuanced understanding of the relationship between mission and church during the formatives stages in the making of an African Christian community, both in America and in British Natal. Critical scholars continue to view the Western mission enterprise as an adjunct if not a tool of colonialism or at best a clash of cultures between white mission powerbrokers and powerless black Christian acolytes. The author argues that they were partners from the beginning, and in this endeavor the Christian identities of the missionaries as well as the Zulu were changed forever.
Author:
Who are you? Where do you come from?
These two simple questions have so many answers and are sometimes even difficult to answer.
This book tells the story of a Buddhist-Muslim community from Padum, in the Zangskar Valley - Indian Greater Himalayas. The author has gained a unique insight into this community during twenty years of research while the people shared doubts and joys with her.
These experiences showed her that the meaning of “belonging” to a homeland or a confessional group, and therefore the transformation of the process of identity building in our modern world, is bridging the gap between tradition and modernity.
This book explores the strategies adopted by the Jesuit missions under the Portuguese and Spanish patronage before Islamic powers such as the Mughal Empire in South Asia and the expansion of Islam in the Southeast Asian peripheries. Based on a comparative perspective, this book examines the interconnections between the Jesuit proselytizing activities and the imperial projects of the Iberian crowns in Asia, highlighting the role of the Jesuit missionaries operating in Asian Islamic settings as diplomatic and cultural mediators. It is aimed at researchers and students working on Jesuit missions in South Asia, the Portuguese and Spanish empires in Asia, early modern cross-cultural diplomacy, early modern travel accounts, and early modern ethnography.
This volume looks at both Jesuit efforts to engage Muslim populations with Europe, such as the Moriscos, and the work of Jesuit missionaries and others in settings such as Constantinople. The activities of the Society of Jesus along the eastern frontier with the Ottoman Empire is detailed, as are the careers of individual Jesuits such as Tomás de León and Antonio Possevino who devoted much of their careers to responding to the claims of Islam and the pressures applied on Christian Europe by Muslim polities. Less well-known Jesuit personalities such as the translator Ignazio Lomellini are also profiled.
Analyse d’une contribution à l’islamologie
À la faveur d’éléments historiques et biographiques inédits, cet ouvrage offre une analyse approfondie de l’œuvre consacrée par Louis Massignon (1883-1962) à la mystique musulmane. Il souligne l’importance de certaines découvertes de l’islamologue pour les études islamiques concernant la période formative du soufisme. Plus encore, ce livre sonde le regard porté par Massignon sur les vocations mystiques en islam et examine à la lumière des travaux récents sa vision de la « sainteté » et de la figure d’al-Ḥallāj (mort en 309/922). Par suite, ce travail fait émerger la question de la posture du chercheur en sciences des religions ainsi que celle des précautions à adopter afin que sa subjectivité ne reconstruise pas le réel, mais l’éclaire et le révèle.

This book provides an extensive analysis of the work of Louis Massignon (1883-1962) on Muslim mysticism, based on previously unpublished historical and biographical elements. It highlights the importance for Islamic Studies of certain discoveries made by the Islamicist concerning the formative period of Sufism. More than that, this book probes Massignon’s view of mystical vocations in Islam and examines, in the light of recent work, his vision of "holiness" and the figure of al-Ḥallāj (d. 309/922). This work opens, more broadly, the question of the posture of the researcher in the study of religion and the precautions to be adopted so that their subjectivity does not reconstruct reality, but illuminates and reveals it.