Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 297 items for :

  • Minority & Group Rights x
  • Just Published x
  • Search level: Titles x
  • Status (Books): Published x
Clear All
In this commentary, Sabine Witting provides a comprehensive analysis of the Second Optional Protocol to the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child on the sale of children, child prostitution and child pornography. This commentary critically reflects on the impact of globalisation, digital technologies and the COVID-19 pandemic on the nature, scope and meaning of the Second Optional Protocol since its adoption on 25 May 2000. Apart from analysing a broad range of topics, from online child sexual abuse to surrogacy and ‘voluntourism’, this commentary highlights the importance of establishing child-friendly transnational collaboration mechanisms, conceptualised through a holistic gender lens and taking into consideration the online-offline nexus of violence against children and relevant Global North-Global South dynamics.
Citizenship Revocation in the 21st Century: Legal, Political and Moral Implications
Over the past two decades, denationalisation – the controversial practice of revoking citizenship from unwanted citizens – has re-entered Western law and politics with astonishing haste. In this book, Christian Prener traces this remarkable development in the United Kingdom, Denmark, France and the United States and offers a timely and critical examination of the legal, moral, and political acceptability of citizenship revocation in response to acts of misconduct or disloyalty.

Through an exploration of contemporary practices, caselaw and theory, the book distils some of the hard questions posed by the Western revival of denationalisation within international human rights law, moral philosophy and political theory as it probes the lawfulness, efficacy, and political legitimacy of revoking citizenship in the 21st century.
Author:
Indigenous Peoples, Natural Resources and Permanent Sovereignty explores the possibility to conceive a permanent sovereignty over natural resources vested in indigenous peoples rather than in States.
The author examines the conceptualisation and content under customary international law of indigenous rights with respect to natural resources, including the impact of the adoption of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples in 2007.
The book provides a deep and updated analysis on international customs, international and regional conventions and the jurisprudence of regional courts concerning indigenous rights to natural resources, including the most recent developments in domestic jurisprudence and legislation.
Globalisation, migration, and (de-)secularisation have fundamentally transformed the concepts of religion, state, and law during the last decades. The main goal of this interdisciplinary approach is to clarify the multifaceted theoretical and practical challenges of religious diversity and socio-political pluralism in Europe.

In twenty-two chapters, the contributions to this volume revisit basic concepts, structures and institutional settings such as sovereignty; the dogma of the separation of state, church and/or religion; human and minority rights; gender and religion; varieties of fundamentalisms; interreligious dialogue and peacebuilding; and, not least, religious education.
This work, a partial history of Iranian laws between 1906 and 2020, demonstrates that the main obstacle to improving the legal status of non-Muslims in Muslim contexts is the fiqhī opinions, which are mistakenly regarded as an integral part of the Islamic faith. It aims to clarify why and how Islamic Shiite rulings about non-Muslims shifted to the Iranian laws and how it is possible to improve the legal status of the Iranian non-Muslims under the Islamic government.
Situating the Right to Citizenship within International and Regional Human Rights Law
The open access publication of this book has been published with the support of the Swiss National Science Foundation.
This book offers a comprehensive analysis of the right to citizenship in international and regional human rights law. It critically reflects on the limitations of state sovereignty in nationality matters and situates the right to citizenship within the existing human rights framework. It identifies the scope and content of the right to citizenship by looking not only at statelessness, deprivation of citizenship or dual citizenship, but more broadly at acquisition, loss and enjoyment of citizenship in a migration context. Exploring the intersection of international migration, human rights law and belonging, the book provides a timely argument for recognizing a right to the citizenship of a specific state on the basis of one’s effective connections to that state according to the principle of jus nexi.
In this original and thought-provoking collection, the Editors provide a multilayered study of the "crime of crimes". Adopted in 1948, and based on Raphael Lemkin's idea, the definition of genocide belongs to the cornerstones of international criminal law and justice.
This volume focuses on, among other topics, the narrow scope of protected groups, wider domestic adaptations of the definition, denial of genocide, and current legal proceedings related to the crime in front of the ICJ and ICC. In this way its authors, based primarily in Central and Eastern Europe, analyse and discuss the readiness of the definition to meet the challenges of criminal justice in our changing world. The volume thus offers much fresh thinking on the international legal and legal policy complexities of genocide seventy years after the Genocide Convention's entry into force.
The European Yearbook of Minority Issues provides a critical and timely review of contemporary developments in minority-majority relations in Europe. It combines analysis, commentary and documentation in relation to conflict management, international legal developments and domestic legislation affecting minorities in Europe.
Part I contains scholarly articles and, the “special focus” section in this year’s volume is devoted to Covid-19 and minorities.
Part II contains reports on national and international developments.
Part III features book reviews introducing and critiquing new, relevant literature within the disciplines of the social sciences, humanities and law.

Apart from providing a unique annual overview of minority issues for both scholars and practitioners in this field, the Yearbook is an indispensable reference tool for libraries, research institutes as well as governments and international organisations.

The European Yearbook of Minority Issues is also available online.