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Volume 1, Cross-cutting Themes
This authoritative commentary drafted by scholars of the Academic Network on the European Social Charter and Social Rights (ANESC) is aimed at academic researchers studying social and economic rights in Europe and legal practitioners, civil society organisations, trade unions and state representatives engaging with the procedures of the European Committee of Social Rights. The text is composed of contributions from a large number of experts, bringing together senior and young scholars across different countries and legal traditions with expertise in social and economic rights and a commitment to enhancing the European system for regulating these rights.

The commentary offers 106 chapters, organised into eight volumes, some of which are focused on the substantive obligations of State Parties to the European Social Charter and the practice of the European Committee of Social Rights and others on the procedures that state representatives, international bodies and applicants must follow to engage with the Charter system.

Volume 1, entitled Cross-Cutting Themes, provides readers with descriptive and analytical accounts of the birth and evolution of the Charter system, the rules governing its interactions with domestic authorities, a number of thematic areas and concepts that elucidate the spirit of the treaty, and the differences and synergies between the European Social Charter and other European and international regulatory frameworks. This volume lays the groundwork for the article-by-article commentary on the European Social Charter that will be presented in the subsequent seven volumes, providing crucial context and highlighting the conceptual and operational links between the various Charter provisions. This first volume is edited by Stefano Angeleri (Queen’s University Belfast) and Carole Nivard (Université de Rouen).
Volume Editor: P. Sean Morris
What was the state of the law and how states managed to fulfil their international legal obligations under the law of nations with respect to intellectual property protection? 13 contributors show how the transition of intellectual property from private rights holders and their non-state patrons evolves into state lawmaking. The book presents these transitions through international legal perspectives and the history of intellectual property rights in late modern societies in Europe, the United States, Asia and Colonial States in Africa.

Contributors are: Daniel Acquah, Ainee Adam, Louise Duncan, Johanna Gibson, Philip Johnson, Jyh-An Lee, Yangzi Li, P. Sean, Morris, Peter Munkacsi, Zvi Rosen, Devanshi Saxena, Johannes Thumfart, and Esther van Zimmeren.
In the law of armed conflicts, one of the elements that has changed the most has been the means and methods of warfare. Yet there are few legal answers for the many questions these changes pose. This volume, therefore, seeks to identify the limitations of current international law on this double plane, the means and methods of combat, and to offer insights about how to address them. Topics include the use of nuclear energy, which without being a weapon, can have the same effect as one, chemical and biological weapons, autonomous artificial intelligence weapons, and biobots.
Similarly, fake news, the hostile use of cyberspace, lawfare, the use of big data, terrorism as a combat method, premeditated poisoning, sexual humiliation, the impact of such news on the armed forces and the reorganization needed to face the new scenarios are all situations not contemplated in classical law and which require new legal and operational responses.
The Yearbook of Polar Law covers a wide variety of law and policy topics relating to the Arctic and the Antarctic, and even the Third Pole. Many of the articles draw on presentations made at the annual Symposiums on Polar Law. The Editors-in-Chief are Gudmundur Alfredsson of the Stefansson Arctic Institute in Akureyri and the China University of Political Science and Law in Beijing, Julia Jabour of the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies, University of Tasmania, Timo Koivurova of the Arctic Centre, University of Lapland, and Akiho Shibata of the Polar Cooperation Research Centre, Kobe University.

Articles published in the Yearbook are peer reviewed, unless otherwise noted. The Yearbook will also carry book reviews and occasional news stories.

The topics covered in the Yearbook include:
- human rights issues, such as autonomy, self-government and self-determination, the rights of indigenous peoples to land and natural resources, cultural rights and cultural heritage, and indigenous traditional knowledge
- local, national and corporate governance issues
- environmental law, climate change, security and human rights implications of climate change, protected areas and species, and biodiversity
- regulatory and management agreements and arrangements for marine environments, marine mammals, fisheries conservation and other biological/mineral/oil resources
- jurisdictional and other issues re the exploration, exploitation and shipping of oil, gas and minerals
- law of the sea, the retreating sea ice, and continental shelf claims
- trade law, potential shipping lines through the northwest and northeast passages, maritime law and transportation law
- territorial claims and border disputes on both land and at sea
- peace and security, and dispute settlement
- the roles and actual involvement of international organizations in the polar regions, such as the Arctic Council, the Nordic Council, the International Whaling Commission, the European Union, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, and the United Nations, and
- the activities of NGOs, think tanks and academic institutions

The papers in this volume are principally based on presentations at the Polar Law Symposium, held online with logistical support by the Kobe University Polar Cooperation Research Centre (PCRC), in November 2020.
The speed of technological change is demonstrated not least by the new military technologies that are in use or are currently being developed. For example, the use of remote-controlled and semi-autonomous weapons systems has long been standard in the armed forces, and advances in artificial intelligence mean that more "decision-making " can be expected to be transferred to the machines used by the military. But not everything that is technologically possible is ethically justifiable.
This volume, which brings together contributions to an annual conference of the European Chapter of the International Society for Military Ethics, attempts to address the ethical and legal problems posed by emerging military technologies. In a number of exciting essays, internationally renowned researchers present their insights.