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The Asian Yearbook of Human Rights and Humanitarian Law aims to publish peer-reviewed scholarly articles and reviews as well as significant developments in human rights and humanitarian law. It examines international human rights and humanitarian law with a global reach, though its particular focus is on the Asian region.

The focused theme of Volume 6 is Essays in Honour of Professor Shaheen Sardar Ali.
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The Israel Yearbook on Human Rights- an annual published under the auspices of the Faculty of Law of Tel Aviv University since 1971- is devoted to publishing studies by distinguished scholars in Israel and other countries on human rights in peace and war, with particular emphasis on problems relevant to the State of Israel and the Jewish people. The Yearbook also incorporates documentary materials relating to Israel and the Administered Areas which are not otherwise available in English (including summaries of judicial decisions, compilations of legislative enactments and military proclamations).
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Are states allowed to prohibit the importation of products made by children? Can foreign investors claim compensation when their host state raises the minimum wage? In this book Ruben Zandvliet examines the ways in which international trade and investment law enables and constrains the ability of states to regulate labour. In addition to analysing the interactions between the relevant norms, it explains how linkages between international economic law and labour navigate between two notions: fair competition and fundamental rights. This study is agnostic about which of these objectives ought to shape international law, thus allowing a critical examination of the relevant rules of public international law, as well as legal and economic scholarship.
The 14th thematic volume of International Development Policy provides perspectives through case studies from the global Souths focusing on the challenges and opportunities of governing migration on the subnational, national, regional and international levels. Bringing together some thirty authors from Africa, Latin America and Asia, the book explores existing and new policies and frameworks in terms of their successes and best practices, and looks at them through the lens of additional challenges, such as those brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic, the rise of nationalisms and an increase in xenophobia. The chapters also take the ‘5 Ps’ approach to sustainable development (people, planet, prosperity, peace and partnerships) and assess how migration policies serve sustainable development in a rapidly evolving context.

Contributors are Yousra Abourabi, Gabriela Agosto, Belkis Aracena, Andrea Fernández Benítez, Macarena Chepo, Amanda Coffie, Jonathan Crush, María del Consuelo Dávila Pérez, Dêlidji Eric Degila, Jenny Lind Elmaco, René Leyva Flores, Luisa Feline Freier, Silvia Núñez García, Marcela Pezoa González, Binod Khadria, Ariel González Levaggi, Wei Li, Meixin Liu, Ling Ma, Ratnam Mishra, Daniel Naujoks, Claudia Padilla, Karol Rojas, Fabiana Rubinstein, Yining Tan, Narender Thakur, Gerasimos Tsourapas, Valeria Marina Valle and Jossette Iribarne Wiff.
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In this book, Niovi Vavoula examines the privacy challenges raised by the establishment, operation and reconfiguration of EU-wide information systems that store personal data, including biometrics, of different categories of third-country nationals that may be used for various immigration related and law enforcement purposes. The monograph analyses both the currently operational databases – Schengen Information System (SIS), Visa Information System (VIS) and Eurodac – and forthcoming systems – Entry/Exit System (EES), European Travel Information and Authorisation Systems (ETIAS) and European Criminal Record Information System for Third-Country Nationals (ECRIS-TCN) – as well as their future interoperability. To assess the compatibility of legal instruments governing information systems and their interoperability with the right to respect for private life, the author calls for the centrality of privacy as the appropriate lens through which instruments involving the processing of personal data should be viewed and offers a typology of privacy standards based on relevant case law by the Strasbourg and Luxemburg Courts.
"This is a ground-breaking book, the first comprehensive analysis of the growing interrelationship between immigration law and privacy law. The book is essential reading for academics, policy makers and legal practitioners working in these fields, and will lead in informing the debate on the relationship between security and human rights in Europe. Rigorous and ambitious, the book will become a reference point in the field."
Professor Valsamis Mitsilegas, Professor of Criminal Law and Global Security, Queen Mary and Westfield School of Law, London.
What constitutes the core values, tenets, cultural, historic, and ideological parameters of secularism in international contexts? In twelve chapters, this edited work examines current tensions in liberal secular states where myriad rights and freedoms compete regarding education, healthcare, end-of-life choices, clothing, sexual orientation, reproduction, and minority interests. It explores the legal complexity of defining a ‘religion’ through judicial decisions and scrutinises Christianity, Hinduism and Islam’s relative success in accommodating religious pluralism.

Part One explores the religious practice and persecution nexus, COVID-19’s effect on religious freedom, religious education, burqas/headscarves, and religious culture in civil law. Part Two explores the constitutional principle of secularism in Member States of the Council of Europe, US Religious Clauses, and religious freedom in South Africa, UK, Australia, and India.
In this original and thought-provoking collection, the Editors provide a multilayered study of the "crime of crimes". Adopted in 1948, and based on Raphael Lemkin's idea, the definition of genocide belongs to the cornerstones of international criminal law and justice.
This volume focuses on, among other topics, the narrow scope of protected groups, wider domestic adaptations of the definition, denial of genocide, and current legal proceedings related to the crime in front of the ICJ and ICC. In this way its authors, based primarily in Central and Eastern Europe, analyse and discuss the readiness of the definition to meet the challenges of criminal justice in our changing world. The volume thus offers much fresh thinking on the international legal and legal policy complexities of genocide seventy years after the Genocide Convention's entry into force.
How international is international humanitarian law? The Laws of Yesterday's Wars 2: From Ancient India to East Africa, together with its companion volume, The Laws of Yesterday’s Wars: From Indigenous Australians to the American Civil War (Brill-Nijhoff, 2021), attempts to answer that question. It offers a culture-by-culture account of various unique restrictions placed on warfare over time. Containing essays by a range of laws of war academics and practitioners, it approaches the laws of yesterday’s wars from a wide cross-section of history and culture, seeking to find any common ground and to demonstrate a history of international law outside the usual confines of its ‘development’ by Europeans and its later ‘contributions.’ This volume includes studies on Japanese, Islamic and Eastern Native American rules of war.