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Editor: Stephen Rowley
European Perceptions of China and Perspectives on the Belt and Road Initiative is a collection of fourteen essays on the way China is perceived in Europe today. These perceptions – and they are multiple – are particularly important to the People’s Republic of China as the country grapples with its increasingly prominent role on the international stage, and equally important to Europe as it attempts to come to terms with the technological, social and economic advances of the Belt and Road Initiative.

The authors are, on the whole, senior academics specializing in such topics as International Relations and Security, Public Diplomacy, Media and Cultural Studies, and Philosophy and Religion from more than a dozen different European countries and are involved in various international projects focussed on Europe-China relations.
Asian Canadians—whether immigrant, international students, naturalized, native-born, or other—are hampered in their exploration and articulation of self by the dearth of critical writing both for them, and by them. Despite the influx of Asian students and their inflated tuition rates to Canadian postsecondary institutions, they are strikingly underrepresented in the literature of the academy. Critical theory focusing on Asian identity, anti-Asian racism, and the Asian-Canadian experience is limited, or presented as an artifact of the past.

Across the globe—but particularly in the English-speaking West—the internationalization of higher education continues its upward trend. 2017 data from the Canadian Bureau for International Education positioned Canada as the fourth-leading destination for international students seeking post-secondary education. The fact that the vast majority of international students at Canadian colleges and universities come from Asia has been well documented in domestic media, but the lived experiences and perspectives of these transnational individuals have not. This edited collection provides much-needed theorizing of Asian-Canadian lived experiences, focusing on such themes as: multiculturalism, diversity, race, culture, agency, education, community activism, citizenship, identity, model minority myths, gender, colonization, neoliberalism, and others.

Contributors include: Sarah Alam, Syed Fahad Ali, Wallis Caldoza, Valerie G. Damasco, Grace Garlow, Allison Lam, Kailan Leung, Juanna Nguyen, Dionisio Nyaga, Jasmine Pham, Vania Soepriatna, Tika Ram Thapa and Rose Ann Torres.
The China Educational Development Yearbooks have been restructured and renamed as Chinese Research Perspectives on Education since 2012.

China’s education system has grown increasingly complex, creating the need for an annual critical review of the education system by China’s top scholars. The Blue Book of Education (教育蓝皮书), as it is known in Chinese, has gained a reputation for offering the most penetrating perspective in China about educational reform and development. The China Educational Development Yearbook is an important English translation of this critical annual report where developments, challenges, and crises in Chinese education are comprehensively discussed and critically analyzed. This series is essential reading for anyone who wants to understand the perspective of some of China’s most critical scholars about the most pressing challenges facing educational development in China.
Editorial Board / Council Member: Fang Cai, Kam Wing Chan, and William Lavely
The China Population and Labor Yearbooks have been restructured and renamed as Chinese Research Perspectives on Population and Labor since 2012.

This yearbook, the English version of the Chinese Green Book of Population and Labor (人口与劳动绿皮书), examines current developments in the Chinese demographic transition and its implications, especially for the labor market. Each annual report is a collection of articles written by demographers and economists from the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences (CASS) and other leading research institutes, policy think tanks, and universities in China. Several of the articles analyze the results of in-depth and population surveys conducted in recent years, and many of the findings of this research has influenced and continues to influence major government policy decisions made by the Chinese government.

The series published one volume over the last 5 years.
Series Editors: Yunxiang Yan and Letian Zhang
Chronicles of Contemporary Chinese Social Life includes part of the data collected at the Fudan Data Center for Contemporary Chinese Social Life by Professor Zhang Letian and his team from grassroots society in China, either directly from the owner/author or from collectors who work with the original owner/author. The data is systematic and comprehensive in a self-standing way. All the data that were selected for publication are from a particular rural collective, an urban work-unit, or a residential community and thus reflect the wholeness of the given unit of social life. These data all stretch for a time span of ten years or more, providing enough temporal depth for research and better understanding. These non-aggregated data at the grassroots level systematically reflect the real social life of a particular community over a long time period; they are rich in details for both in-depth case studies and comparative studies. As these kinds of data have never been published before, this publication is truly unique and original.

The targeted readers include China scholars around the world, particularly those whose research focus on contemporary or post-1949 China and/or teaching courses for the same period, graduate students in the same fields for both learning and their own research, and some individuals from the concerned public who want to learn more about Chinese social life by engaging in original and untouched empirical data.
Memory, Movement, and Modernities across Hemispheres
Series Editors:
Richard T. Chu, University of Massachusetts
Augusto F. Espiritu, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Mariam Lam, University of California, Riverside

For some time now, studies on Southeast Asians have often situated the experiences of these peoples within the territorial boundaries of their countries and within the regional framework of Southeast Asia. Geographically fixed to the Philippines, Thailand, Burma, Cambodia, Laos, Vietnam, Indonesia, Brunei, East Timor, and Singapore, Southeast Asia emerges, as critical area studies underscore, as a site marked by multivalent politics, histories, and cultures. The processes of globalization, neoliberalism, and war have unmoored such fixities in the Eastern as much as in the Western Hemispheres, causing tectonic shifts in the constructions of memory, massive population movements and migrations, and ever new projects and worldings responding to various regimes of the “modern.” Whereas Southeast Asian studies may remain regionally focused, Southeast Asian American studies must increase its focus on the understudied complex, transnational flows and manifold expressions of the Southeast Asian diasporic experience.

Attendant to the rise of the Southeast Asian diasporas, Global Southeast Asian Diasporas (SEAD) provides a peer-reviewed forum for studies that specifically investigate the histories and experiences of Southeast Asian diasporic subjects across hemispheres. We especially invite studies that critically focus on the Southeast Asian experience from a transnational, comparative, and international perspective. SEAD welcomes submissions from a wide array of disciplinary fields (including history, sociology, political science, cultural studies, literary studies, and anthropology, among others) that innovatively interrogate themes such as refugees, political asylum, gender/sexuality, colonialism, globalization, empire, nation/nationalism, ethnicity, and transnationalism.

Manuscripts should be at least 90,000 words in length (including footnotes and bibliography). Manuscripts may also include illustrations, tables, and other visual material. The editors will consider proposals for original monographs, edited collections, translations, and critical primary source editions.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts by email to the Publisher, Chunyan Shu.
The Religious Studies in Contemporary China Collection (RSCC), co-published in cooperation with Minzu Press, makes Chinese scholarly research on religion available in English. This series includes six volumes of selected essays on the following topics: Popular Religion and Shamanism, Taoism, Buddhism, Christianity, Islam, and Marxism and Religious Studies. The volumes in this series touch upon areas, such as popular religion, that are largely ignored in English language scholarship. These works are not only important to China scholars, but also serve as an invaluable resource for non-China specialists and students who are interested in Chinese history, religion and ethnicity.

Series Editors: Rüdiger Frank and Alfred Gerstl
Will the twenty-first century be the Asian century? Will the People’s Republic of China (PRC) overtake the United States as the leading global superpower? Will an institutionalised Third Bloc emerge in international relations and challenge the transatlantic alliance that has dominated world politics for such a long time? While opinions on the details differ strongly, there seems to be a certain consensus that the East Asian region, roughly defined as Northeast Asia (Greater China, the two Koreas, Japan and the Russian Far East) plus Southeast Asia (the ten members states of ASEAN), will be globally significant in the years to come and see its role growing. Such a role includes almost all fields such as economics, science and technology, migration, culture, and international relations. These issues are interrelated and often overlap.

This series, therefore, takes as its main focus the field of international relations post-WWII that pertain to the region and in particular the question of collective security and related issues, including options for institutionalised mechanisms of a joint regional security policy. The need for such a focus has become increasingly obvious: shifts in the global balance of power, as well as a multitude of conflicts in the region, some old and unresolved, some new and emerging, actual or potential, call for ongoing detailed appraisal and sustainable solutions.

This series is as of 2019 continued as the Journal of Religion and Demography

The Yearbook of International Religious Demography presents an annual snapshot of the state of religious statistics around the world. Every year large amounts of data are collected through censuses, surveys, polls, religious communities, scholars, and a host of other sources. These data are collated and analyzed by research centers and scholars around the world. Large amounts of data appear in analyzed form in the World Religion Database (Brill), aiming at a researcher’s audience. The Yearbook presents data in sets tables and scholarly articles spanning social science, demography, history, and geography. Each issue offers findings, sources, methods, and implications surrounding international religious demography. Each year an assessment is made of new data made available since the previous issue of the yearbook.
Author: Reiko YAMATO
East Asian societies have a patri-lineal tradition in which a family successor must be a son and parents live with the heir and his family. In Japan, the patri-lineal family system was prevalent among the samurai warrior class in the early modern period. In the modern period, it was stipulated in the civil code until the end of World War II. This tradition, however, is changing with a background of gender equalization and fewer number of sons resulting from low birth rates. Intergenerational Relationships between Married Children and Their Parents in 21st Century Japan is the first book that introduces a new perspective of the individualized marriage into a study of intergenerational relationships and examines how the patri-lineal tradition is both changing and maintained. This book deals with patri-local coresidence, matri-local nearby-residence, and support exchange between adult children and their parents/ parents-in-law, and offer a new framework for comparative studies of today’s East Asian families.