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The story of Tobit builds on various themes derived from myth, legend and folktale. Tobiah’s journey recalls Homer’s Odyssey, the suffering of the righteous brings to mind the legend of Job, and the narrative around a disgraced and then rehabilitated official evokes the story of Ahiqar. The author of Tobit seeks to exploit his readers’ knowledge of these stories in order to convey his message more effectively: he encourages them to trust in divine providence that intervenes on behalf of the faithful.
This volume, based on essays previously published in Italian, charts Tobit’s narrative sources through comparative literary analysis, firmly placing the story in the genre of the didactic and edifying religious novel.
Textual, Visual and Musical Receptions of Horace from the 15th to the 18th Century
This volume explores various perceptions, adaptations and appropriations of both the personality and the writings of Horace in the early modern age. The fifteen essays in this book are devoted to uncharted facets of the reception of Horace and thus substantially broaden our picture of the Horatian tradition. Special attention is given to the legacy of Horace in the visual arts and in music, beyond the domain of letters. By focusing on the multiple channels through which the influence of Horace was felt and transmitted, this volume aims to present instances of the Horatian heritage across the media, and to stimulate a more thorough reflection on an interdisciplinary and multi-medial approach to the exceptionally rich and variegated afterlife of Horace.

Contributors: Veronica Brandis, Philippe Canguilhem, Giacomo Comiati, Karl A.E. Enenkel, Carolin A. Giere, Inga Mai Groote, Luke B.T. Houghton, Chris Joby, Marc Laureys, Grantley McDonald, Lukas Reddemann, Bernd Roling, Robert Seidel, Marcela Slavíková, Paul J. Smith, and Tijana Žakula.
Volume 4: Islam, Europe and Beyond: A. Islam and the Middle Ages. B. Manuscripts, a Basis of Knowledge and Science, C. History of the Discipline, D. Obituaries, E. Indices
Author:
From the Greeks to the Arabs and Beyond written by Hans Daiber, is a six volume collection of Daiber’s scattered writings, journal articles, essays and encyclopaedia entries on Greek-Syriac-Arabic translations, Islamic theology and Sufism, the history of science, Islam in Europe, manuscripts and the history of oriental studies. The collection contains published (since 1967) and unpublished works in English, German, Arabic, Persian and Turkish, including editions of Arabic and Syriac texts. The publication mirrors the intercultural character of Islamic thought and sheds new light on many aspects ranging from the Greek pre-Socratics to the Malaysian philosopher Naquib al-Attas. A main concern is the interpretation of texts in print or in manuscripts, culminating in two catalogues (Vol. V and VI), which contain descriptions of newly discovered, mainly Arabic, manuscripts in all fields.
Vol. I: Graeco-Syriaca and Arabica.
Vol. II: Islamic Philosophy.
Vol. III: From God’s Wisdom to Science: A. Islamic Theology and Sufism; B. History of Science.
Vol. IV: Islam, Europe and Beyond: A. Islam and Middle Ages; B. Manuscripts – a Basis of Knowledge and Science; C. History of the Discipline; D. Obituaries; E. Indexes.
Vol. V: Unknown Arabic Manuscripts from Eight Centuries – Including one Hebrew and Two Ethiopian Manuscripts: Daiber Collection III.
Vol. VI: Arabic, Syriac, Persian and Latin Manuscripts on Philosophy, Theology, Science and Literature. Films and Offprints: Daiber Collection IV.
In the post-Enlightenment world, philosophy and religion have come to occupy different, even opposed, domains. But how were they related before this? What were the commonalities and dissimilarities between them? Did they already contain the seeds of their later division – or do they still share enough in common to allow meaningful conversation between them?

This new Brill series “Ancient Philosophy & Religion” provides an interdisciplinary platform for monographs, edited volumes and commentaries on this issue. It is edited by two leading scholars in the fields it brings together, George Boys-Stones (Ancient Philosophy) and George van Kooten (New Testament Studies), and is supported by an editorial board whose members are known for their work in the area. It invites scholars of ancient philosophy, Classics, early Judaism, ancient Judaism, New Testament & early Christianity, and all other relevant fields, to showcase their research on ancient philosophy and religion and to contribute to the debate.

The series’ subject matter is symbolized by its icon, used by courtesy and permission of the New Acropolis Museum in Athens. It represents a dialogue between philosophers, as shown on one of the reliefs of the funeral sacrificial table (mensa) from the “House of Proclus” on the Southern slope of the Acropolis at Athens, excavated in 1955. Dating from 350-325 BC, the reliefs of the mensa depict, after the lamentation and the farewell, the posthumous encounter of the deceased with the philosophers (1950 NAM 90).

The editors very much welcome proposals for monographs, edited volumes and even commentaries on relevant texts.

Editor:
This strand of Brill Research Perspectives addresses important themes connected with the reworking of material inherited from classical antiquity, primarily the Latin language and Latin writing conventions, but also the creative adaptation of classical traditions in other languages and media. Contributions by leading scholars from different disciplinary backgrounds will provide up-to-date overviews on the context, key texts, controversial questions, existing scholarship and avenues for further research concerning particular themes. These surveys are designed to give advanced students and scholars new to this particular area an idea of the sources, approaches and existing research, sketching scholarly history and facilitating further work.
Editor:
Contributions generally aim to present broad syntheses on topics relating to a specific theme, discussions of key issues, or try to provide summaries of relevant new fieldwork. The volumes address themes relating to the historical reconstruction of Mediterranean society, from the accession of Diocletian (AD 283) to approximately the middle of the 7th century.
This collection includes the first 36 volumes of the series Papyrologica Lugduno-Batava (1941-2018). It contains publications of papyrological, mainly documentary texts, as well as articles and monographs, on the themes of law and society in Ancient Egypt, in particular in the Graeco-Roman period. The focus of the series lies on the Greek and Demotic sources, however attention is also given to documents in Hieratic, Coptic and Latin. The series is a publication of the Foundation for the Papyrological Institute of the University of Leiden. The aim of the Foundation is the promotion of the study of Greek and Demotic papyrology in Leiden. All publications in this series are peer reviewed.
Brill’s narratological commentaries on ancient texts aims at publishing commentaries to both well-known narrative texts from Greek and Latin literature and texts for which hardly any commentary is available yet, such as the novels or late epics. It also welcomes commentaries on Byzantine narrative texts, medieval texts in Latin, and books from the Hebrew Bible and early Christian texts, including the New Testament.
The commentaries in this series approach the ancient texts with a relatively new but successful and exciting literary method: narratology. In addition to other specialised forms of commentaries such as historical, linguistic and philosophical commentaries, a narratological commentary lays bare the narrative artistry of texts, for instance the way in which a narrator communicates with his narratees, accelerates or slows down the rhythm of narration, represents space, anticipates later developments or inserts flashbacks, focalises events or makes us look at them through the eyes of one of his characters, represents the words spoken by characters, and endows the setting of events with a thematic or symbolic meaning.

The commentaries are written in English, but German manuscripts may be included as well. The theoretical apparatus is derived preferably from standard introductions like I.J.F. de Jong, Narratology and Classics: a practical guide, Monika Fludernik, An Introduction to Narratology, or David Herman, Basic Elements of Narrative.
This Narratological Commentary on Silius’ Battle of Ticinus lays bare the narrative form of the text by addressing numerous narratological aspects, including plot-development, focalization, space, and intertextuality. The book also focuses on the phenomenon of ambiguity with its dynamic processes of (un-)strategic production, perception, and resolution. Ambiguity is a central feature of the Punica because of the epic’s constant oscillation between fact and fiction: it treats the changing fortunes of war and the tension between Rome and Carthage, which Silius translates into a moment of poetical equilibrium by his paradoxical problematization of triumph in defeat and defeat through triumph.
Anchoring Cultural Formation in the First Millennium BCE
Canonisation is fundamental to the sustainability of cultures. This volume is meant as a (theoretical) exploration of the process, taking Eurasian societies from roughly the first millennium BCE (Babylonian, Assyrian, Persian, Greek, Egyptian, Jewish and Roman) as case studies. It focuses on canonisation as a form of cultural formation, asking why and how canonisation works in this particular way and explaining the importance of the first millennium BCE for these question and vice versa. As a result of this focus, notions like anchoring, cultural memory, embedding and innovation play an important role throughout the book.