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Commemorating the Legacy of James Legge (1815-1897)
Author: Alexander Chow
This volume explores the important legacy of Scottish missions to China, with a focus on the missionary-scholar and Protestant sinologist par excellence James Legge (1815–1897). It challenges the simplistic caricature of Protestant missionaries as Orientalizing imperialists, but also shows how the Chinese context and Chinese persons “converted” Scottish missionaries in their understandings of China and the broader world.

Scottish Missions to China brings together essays by leading Chinese, European, and North American scholars in mission history, sinology, theology, cultural and literary studies, and psychology. It calls attention to how the historic enterprise of Scottish missions to China presents new insights into Scottish-Chinese and British-Chinese relations.

Contributors are: Joanna Baradziej, Marilyn L. Bowman, Alexander Chow, Gao Zhiqiang, Joachim Gentz, David Jasper, Christopher Legge, Lauren F. Pfister, David J. Reimer, Brian Stanley, Yang Huilin, Zheng Shuhong.
Series Editors: Niki Alsford and Mark Harrison
Taiwan Studies is a growing field with increasing influence. The series, founded by J. Bruce Jacobs†, is to publish high quality research which breaks new ground and/or gives new insights to Taiwan. Monographs and edited books from all disciplines, as well as cross-disciplinary and multi-disciplinary research are welcomed. The editors of the series are also keen to see submissions of translated work, either directly or in scholarly methodology, that would welcome the Taiwan intellectual world into English. In addition to this, comparative research where Taiwan is an important component is also welcome. The series aims to reach academics, informed readers, as well as policy makers.
Series Editors: Paolo Santangelo and Cheuk Yin Lee
The focus of this series is to gradually build a picture of the mental structure in China and East Asia. All volumes analyse the instances of affective experiences over a wide variety of Chinese or other East Asian texts from the same underlying database. The truly multi-disciplinary research method guarantees new and unexpected insights into the representation of the ‘mental-structure’ in Chinese and other East Asian societies from the angles of cultural anthropology, linguistics, psycholinguistics, literary criticism, history, and sociology. Aim of the series is, besides deepening our knowledge on the various shades of meaning in the imagery of the times, to reduce the subjectivity and cultural bias of researchers' analyses. The accompanying glossaries are invaluable reference material for any student of Chinese. This is an encyclopedic series.

Brill’s book series Science and Religion in East Asia features scholarly monographs and edited volumes, focusing on the question of how human understanding of the world and its application to various fields of socio-cultural life in East Asian societies were shaped in the context of religious thought and practices, notably those of Confucianism, Daoism and Buddhism.
Recent scholarship on the history of European science in medieval and early modern periods has shown that society’s scientific endeavor was inextricably intertwined with spiritual and moral pursuits, classified in modern times as a separate category called "religion". The rich resources in East Asia on both scientific pursuits and moral-religious teachings, enable us to examine the fine texture of relations woven in the course of the continuous interchange of aims, methods, and knowledge between these scientific and moral-religious enterprises.
A special emphasis is put on the relation between science and what is called Confucianism, the most common and dominant thread of thought in East Asian societies. Science and Confucianism developed form and content to a considerable degree under the influence of ideas and techniques from Daoist and Buddhist traditions. From the sixteenth century onwards, they also interacted with Western science that had been developed in Europe dominated by Christianity. Science and Religion in East Asia pays ample attention to the role of these other religions present in East Asia as well and the interaction with other regions of the world.

Series Editors: Robert Bickers, Rana Mitter, and Peter O'Connor
Over the past decades a vast amount of often full-text searchable newspaper and other source material from modern East Asia have been made available for research, much of which is in Western languages. The sheer wealth of detail has brought new challenges to research on the region in terms of methodology and theory. Studies on Modern East Asian History is the prime publication vehicle for monographs and edited volumes on the period of large-scale Western interaction with the region from the Opium Wars in the mid-nineteenth century right up to the Korean War in the early 1950s.
Buddhist Statecraft in East Asia explores the long relationship between Buddhism and the state in premodern times and seeks to counter the modern, secularist notion that Buddhism, as a religion, is inherently apolitical. By revealing the methods by which members of Buddhist communities across premodern East Asia related to imperial rule, this volume offers case studies of how Buddhists, their texts, material culture, ideas, and institutions legitimated rulers and defended regimes across the region.
The volume also reveals a history of Buddhist writing, protest, and rebellion against the state.
Contributors are Stephanie Balkwill, James A. Benn, Megan Bryson, Gregory N. Evon, Geoffrey C. Goble, Richard D. McBride II, and Jacqueline I. Stone.
Author: Hans Derks
Both Karl Marx and Max Weber inspired the writing of the two volumes of The Market and the Oikos. Weber coined a market versus oikos contradiction, in which oikos not only means house, household or family, but later also the state, while Marx saw a town versus country antagonism. Both scholars, however, explained insufficiently these most complicated concepts, let alone some mutual relationships. This second volume, The Market and the Oikos, Vol. II: The Peasant and the Nomad in History, continues the analysis of their antagonisms in their mutual relationships by providing the main practical characteristics in different historical, economic and sociological contexts, based on the writing of Max Weber as explained in Vol. I. While the first volume tried to characterize the relationships from economic and historical points of view, this second volume takes a historical/sociological angle. In both volumes, Hans Derks’ argument proceeds from early world historical examples to the present context of contemporary China, stressing the highly neglected role of nomads in history.