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This is a full Open Access series. All volumes can be downloaded for free from the moment of publication and book publication charges are waived thanks to the funders mentioned below.

The growth of scholarship in the field of Jesuit studies continues to accelerate at an extraordinary rate. Staying current on a variety of subjects is becoming increasingly difficult for scholars, even within their own disciplines. This is even more true for students. In response to this trend Brill Research Perspectives in Jesuit Studies aims to publish four peer reviewed volumes per year on various thematic and geographical/chronological subjects. The series complements other Brill publications in the field, such as the Journal of Jesuit Studies, the Jesuit Studies book series, and the Jesuit Historiography Online.

Brill Research Perspectives in Jesuit Studies is published in Open Access thanks to generous support from the following institutions:

- Ateneo de Manila University, Quezon City, Philippines
- College of the Holy Cross, Worcester, Massachusetts (USA)
- Georgia Southern University, Statesboro, Georgia (USA)
- Jesuit Historical Institute in Africa, Nairobi, Kenya
- Le Moyne College, Syracuse, New York (USA)
- Saint Louis University, St. Louis, Missouri (USA)
- Santa Clara University, Santa Clara, California (USA)

In Alfonso de Cartagena’s 'Memoriale virtutum' (1422) María Morrás and Jeremy Lawrance offer a new edition from the manuscripts of a compilation of Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics addressed by the major Castilian intellectual of the day, bishop Alfonso de Cartagena, to the heir to the throne of Portugal, crown prince Duarte.
The work was a speculum principis, an education for the future king in the virtues suitable to a statesman; Cartagena’s choice of Aristotle was thus a significant index of the advent of new Renaissance ideas. This edition shows how the “memorial” throws light on the ideological transformation of society those ideas would bring, setting new ethical guidelines for the ruling class at the crossroads between medieval feudalism and Renaissance absolutism.
The medieval dissenters known as ‘Waldenses’, named after their first founder, Valdes of Lyons, have long attracted careful scholarly study, especially from specialists writing in Italian, French and German. Waldenses were found across continental Europe, from Aragon to the Baltic and East-Central Europe. They were long-lived, resilient, and diverse. They lived in a special relationship with the prevailing Catholic culture, making use of the Church’s services but challenging its claims.

Many Waldenses are known mostly, or only, because of the punitive measures taken by inquisitors and the Church hierarchy against them. This volume brings for the first time a wide-ranging, multi-authored interpretation of the medieval Waldenses to an English-language readership, across Europe and over the four centuries until the Reformation.

Contributors: Marina Benedetti, Peter Biller, Luciana Borghi Cedrini, Euan Cameron, Jacques Chiffoleau, Albert de Lange, Andrea Giraudo, Franck Mercier, Grado Giovanni Merlo, Georg Modestin, Martine Ostorero, Damian J. Smith, Claire Taylor, and Kathrin Utz Tremp.
Clément d’Alexandrie (150-215 Ap. J.-C.) est l’un des penseurs les plus brillants des premiers siècles chrétiens. Son enseignement, tout autant pétri de la Bible que de la pensée grecque, nous révèle la nature des débats aux premières heures de l’expansion du christianisme. Ce livre aborde un sujet peu étudié à ce jour, à savoir sa pensée sur l’Église. C’est pourtant un sujet récurent de ses ouvrages, où il réfléchit longuement sur l’Église à partir de l’être et la mission du Logos divin. L’analyse du discours de Clément sur l’Église permet donc de revisiter les intuitions principales de sa christologie tout en apportant un éclairage sur sa perception de l’identité chrétienne à une époque où celle-ci est encore en construction.

Clement of Alexandria (AD 150-215) is one of the most brilliant thinkers of the early Christian centuries. His teaching, steeped as much in the Bible as in Greek thought, reveals to us the nature of the debates in the early days of the expansion of Christianity. This book deals with a subject little studied to this day, namely his thoughts on the Church. Yet it is a recurring subject in his works, where he reflects at length on the Church from the point of view of the being and the mission of the divine Logos. Analysis of Clement’s discourse on the Church therefore makes it possible to revisit the main intuitions of his Christology while shedding light on his perception of Christian identity at a time when it is still under construction.
Editor: Jan Bloemendal
In his ‘Project of the New Testament’ Erasmus also wrote a running commentary on all New Testament books, except Revelation, in the form of a paraphrase. In this volume, the Paraphrase on John – Latin text with critical apparatus, and English introduction and commentary, is edited. In the paraphrase, Erasmus turns out to be a mature interpreter of the Bible, who advocated a new Christianity, which he called ‘the philosophy of Christ’, and implicitly criticized the clergy of his own age.
The Theology of God’s Power and Its Bearing on the Western Legal Tradition, 1100–1600
With a foreword by Diego Quaglioni

This book attempts to determine the degree to which the modern fate of the Western legal tradition depends on one of the most long-standing debates of the Middle Ages, the distinction between potentia Dei absoluta and ordinata (God’s absolute and ordered power). The mediaeval investigation into God’s attributes was originally concerned with the problem of divine almightiness. It underwent a slow but steady displacement from the territory of theology to the freshly emerging proceedings of legal analysis. Here, based on the distinction, late-mediaeval lawyers worked out a new terminology to define the extent of the power-holder’s authority. This effort would give rise, during the early modern era, to the gradual establishment of the legal-political framework represented by the concepts of the prince and sovereignty.
Author: Stephen Waers
This book argues that Origen’s early Trinitarian theology cannot be understood apart from his engagement with monarchianism. After providing a detailed, synthetic account of monarchianism in the early third century, the book considers Origen’s response to monarchianism alongside the responses of his rough contemporaries. Specifically, the final chapters address the question of Origen’s subordinationism. When viewed in his contemporary context and not through the anachronistic lens of Nicene theology, this study argues that Origen’s so-called subordinationism was an intentional anti-monarchian polemic strategy.