Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 4 of 4 items for :

  • Area Studies x
  • Brill | Sense x
  • Social Sciences x
  • Status (Books): Published x
Clear All Modify Search

Symbolic Traces of Communist Legacy in Post-Socialist Hungary

Experiences of a Generation that Lived During the Socialist Era

Series:

Lisa Pope Fischer

In Symbolic Traces of Communist Legacy in Post-socialist Hungary, Lisa Pope Fischer shows how personal practices symbolically refurbish elements from the Communist era to fit present-day challenges. A generation who lived through the socialist period adapt to post-socialist Hungary in a global context. Life histories weave together case studies of gift giving, procurement strategies, harvest ritual, healthcare, and socialist kitsch to illustrate turns towards mysticism, neo-traditionalism, nostalgia, nationalism, and shifts in time-place. People’s unrequited past longing for future possibilities of a Western society facilitate desires for a lost way of life. Not only does this work gain understanding of an aging population’s life experiences and the politics of everyday practices, but also social change in a modern global world.

Managing Invisibility

Dissimulation and Identity Maintenance among Alevi Bulgarian Turks

Series:

Hande Sözer

In Managing Invisibility, Hande Sözer examines complicated invisibilities of Alevi Bulgarian Turks, a double-minority which faces structural discrimination in Bulgaria and Turkey. While the literature portrays minorities’ visibility as a requirement for their empowerment or a source of their surveillance, the book argues that for such minorities what matters is their control over their own visibility. To make this point, it focuses on the concept protective dissimulation, a strategy of self-imposed invisibility. It discusses cases indicating Alevi Bulgarian Turks’ strategies of dealing with historically changing majorities in their larger societies and argues that dissimulation actually reinforces the intergroup distinctions for the minority’s members. The data for the book was gathered during 18 months of ethnographic fieldwork in Bulgaria and Turkey.

Series:

Mark Pittaway

Edited by Adam Fabry

From the Vanguard to the Margins is dedicated to the work of the late British historian, Dr Mark Pittaway (1971-2010), a prominent scholar of post-war and contemporary Central and Eastern Europe (CEE). Breaking with orthodox readings on Eastern bloc regimes, which remain wedded to the 'totalitarianism' paradigm of the Cold War era, the essays in this volume shed light on the contradictory historical and social trajectory of 'real socialism' in the region.

Mainstream historiography has presented Stalinist parties as 'omnipotent', effectively stripping workers and society in general of its 'relative autonomy'. Building on an impressive amount of archive material, Pittaway convincingly shows how dynamics of class, gender, skill level, and rural versus urban location, shaped politics in the period. The volume also offers novel insights on historical and sociological roots of fascism in Hungary and the politics of legitimacy in the Austro-Hungarian borderlands.

From Yugoslavia to the Western Balkans

Studies of a European Disunion, 1991-2011

Series:

Robert Hayden

This book brings together important original contributions to scholarly and political/policy debates over the disintegration of Yugoslavia, and especially the war in Bosnia. The analyses are grounded on empirically-based arguments about social and political dynamics, resonate with much larger/enduring issues of social science inquiry, and consistently challenge commonly-held beliefs about the Balkans that are based more on ignorance, misunderstanding, or outright prejudice, than on intimate knowledge of the region, its peoples, and their histories. When first published, some of these essays represented sharply distinctive analyses which have since then become “common wisdom.” Hayden’s arguments about how this multinational European federation collapsed following a severe economic crisis are disturbingly relevant to analyzing the crisis of the European Union twenty years later.