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Narratives of Teaching for Social Justice and Community
This book incorporates art-based, partnership-oriented inquiry into social justice discourses and advances qualitative research strategies through the medium of three theoretical frameworks: phenomenology, critical ethnographic research, and poststructuralist theories. Maxine Greene's aesthetic theories motivated to create the ARtS initiative and the author explores the possibility of enhancing children’s understanding of active citizenship and community. It illustrates narratives from children in an urban context while they developed a sense of constructive community and active citizenship in an afterschool program called the ARtS (aesthetic, reflexive thoughts, & sharing) initiative.

As a qualitative methodology text, Three Approaches to Qualitative Research through the ARtS explicates theoretical tenets and research strategies in art-based research. This book shows three examples of how to connect a theoretical framework with the analysis of ethnographic data. A nexus between theory and practice enables researchers and practitioners to understand the value of aesthetic-inspired programs to foster democratic citizenship and to advance equity issues. Social justice-oriented teacher educators, qualitative researchers, and artists will explore and learn how the ARtS initiative recognizes the power of art and multiple research methodologies in imagining and representing a community differently and advancing social justice in a challenging time.
Employing Reflexive Inquiry to Explore Teacher Identity
Editor: Ellyn Lyle
Teacher identity resides in the foundational beliefs and assumptions educators have about teaching and learning. These beliefs and assumptions develop both inside and outside of the classroom, blurring the lines between the professional and the personal. Examining the development of teacher identity at this intersection requires a unique reflexive capacity.

Reflexive inquiry is both established and continually emerging. At its most basic, reflexivity refers to researchers’ consciousness of their role in and effect on both the act of doing research and arriving at research findings. In making central the role of the researcher in the research process, reflexive inquiry interrogates agency while examining philosophical notions about the nature of knowledge.

While advancements have been made in investigating the relationship between teacher knowledge and teacher practice, the research often fails to connect this meaning with self-knowledge and issues of identity. Through a consideration of these tenets, the authors in this collection embrace critical, qualitative, creative, and arts-integrated approaches to examine ways that reflexive inquiry supports studies in teacher identity. Moving between theory and lived experience, the authors individually and collectively lay bare teacher identity as negotiated while evidencing the epistemological merits of reflexive inquiry.
This book brings together interviews with twenty-one artist-teachers from different parts of the world, offering many insights into their identities, challenges and creative and pedagogic practices they have adopted. Based in a range of educational situations—from compulsory to post-secondary education, art schools, departments of art education and community-based environments—these educators discuss their own training in fine art and/or art education, research interests, teaching methods and theoretical outlooks, collaborative projects, students’ ambitions, exhibitions and the different approaches they use to connect their educational and artistic commitments. The discussions take place against a contextual backdrop that is tackled in every interview, bringing to the fore the impact of social, political, historical and institutional frameworks on artist-teachers. Illustrated with images of works and projects by each artist-teacher in the book, the volume combines the visual and the verbal in a way that reflects the complex experiences and identities of the interviewees.

Raphael Vella is a Senior Lecturer in Art Education at the Faculty of Education, University of Malta. Apart from coordinating and teaching in art education courses, he also teaches courses in fine art and theory. His publications address the relationships between contemporary artistic practices and education, art education in the Mediterranean, identity in art education, photography and cultural studies, and arts-based research. He is also actively involved in the curation of international and Maltese exhibitions and cultural events, and in recent years he initiated projects such as Divergent Thinkers (aimed at creating a platform for emerging artists based in Malta) and the Valletta International Visual Arts festival (VIVA). He is also a practising artist, having shown his work in many contexts, including Malta, Venice, Warsaw, Tokyo, Reims, Buenos Aires, Nicosia and Oxford.