Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 4 of 4 items for :

  • Brill | Sense x
  • Research Methodology x
  • Status (Books): Published x
Clear All Modify Search

The Collaborative Turn

Working Together in Qualitative Research

Edited by Walter S. Gershon

"Pulling back the curtain on the collaborative process, Walter Gershon’s stunning new collection highlights the complex, multi-dimensional nature of qualitative research today. The Collaborative Turn: Working Together in Qualitative Research powerfully deepens and richens ongoing discussions around collaborative inquiry so central today. Drawing together a wide range of senior and emergent scholars, as well as a span of traditional and experimental approaches, this cutting-edge text is ideal for both new and seasoned scholars alike. -- Greg Dimitriadis, Professor, University at Buffalo, SUNY Gershon's edited volume on emerging collaborative methodological practices is a welcome resource for qualitative researchers who want to make their research more transparent, improvisational, and reflexive. It juxtaposes the latest reflections of innovators like Lather, Smithies, and Clandinin with new forms of collaboration in the arts and PAR. This interdisciplinary approach provides much food for thought that will surely inspire even bolder methodological experimentation. -- Douglas Foley, Professor of Cultural Studies in Education and of Anthropology, The University of Texas-Austin This book presents invaluable (and rarely seen) reflections on collaboration, which is a central practice for qualitative researchers, across disciplines. The authors examine their relationships and experiences with other researchers and with participants, resulting in an engaging text that explores the methodological and ethical implications of generating meaning in collaborative interactions. The end result is a ‘must-read’ text that educates and enlightens about the joys and challenges of collaborative research. -- Lisa M. Given, Director, International Institute for Qualitative Methodology, University of Alberta It is evident that qualitative research must be a social activity. But like so much in social life, it is taken for granted in the everyday practice of this methodology. This book lays bare the collaboration that is often unspoken on our work. Authors in Walter Gershon’s The Collaborative Turn push at current methodological boundaries enabling us to see the social practice of qualitative research in novel, creative, and artistic ways. -- George W. Noblit, Joseph R. Neikirk Distinguished Professor of Sociology of Education, UNC-Chapel Hill"

In the Spirit of Ubuntu

Stories of Teaching and Research

Series:

Edited by Diane Caracciolo and Anne M. Mungai

This is an excellent and timely bookIn the Spirit of Ubuntu: Stories of Teaching and Research represents a seminal educational intervention that should re-direct the way we see and interact with learning and pedagogical projects and relationships. The book is well organized, is written in non-alienating, humanist language, and should be very useful for students, researchers, and the general public. Students in the West, who are not familiar with the philosophy of ubuntu, should be exposed to the contents of this book.”—Ali A Abdi, in Alberta Journal of Educational Research, Vol. 58, No. 4

Life History Research

Epistemology, Methodology and Representation

Edited by Michael Anthony Samuel, Rubby Dhunpath and Michael Samuel

Much has been written about lifehistory research in recent times. It has been paraded as a counterculture to the traditional research canon, and celebrated as a genre that promotes methodological pluralism. However, lifehistory researchers have an obligation to transcend spurious claims about the perceived merits of the methodology and extend the debates around how the genre simultaneously problematises and responds to the competing challenges of Epistemology, Methodology and Representation.
In conceiving of each of the chapters from an epistemological perspective, the authors focus on how their individual work has crossed or expanded traditional borders of epistemology and ontology; of how the work has satisfied the rigours of thesis production and contributed to changing conceptions of knowledge, what knowledge gets produced and how knowledge is produced when we make particular methodological choices.
Since any methodological orientation is invariably selective, and the researcher is always involved and implicated in the production of data, the authors focus on what selections they have made in their projects, what governed these choices, what benefits/deficits those choices yielded, and what the implications of their research are for those meta-narratives that have established the regimes of truth, legitimacy, and veracity in research.
Knowledge production is inextricably linked to representation. In the process of articulating their findings, each author made particular representational choices, sometimes transgressing conventional approaches. The book explores why these choices were made and how the choices influenced the kinds of knowledge generated. The book provides theoretical justifications for these transgressions and reflect on how the experience of representation helped disrupt the authors’ essentialist notions of research production and for whom it is produced.
This book is not another celebration of lifehistory as a counterculture. The book hopes to be a deeply critical contribution to disrupt notions around epistemological authority, voice and power and how these are mediated by the delicate relations of the researcher and researched. The problematises and complicates the assumptions that frame this genre with a view to highlighting the potential hazards of the method while demonstrating its potentiality in shaping our conceptions of Ethics, Methodology and Representation.

Series:

Edited by Julia Resnik

"What impact does globalization have on the production of educational knowledge, and on the way scholars envisage education systems and education in general?
Western education systems are being transformed, and their role redefined, in light of the processes of globalization: education targets are being reshaped in response to global economic needs; education systems are rated according to international rankings and education itself has been packaged into a commodity that can be commercialized worldwide. In addition, globalization prompts more intimate contact with different types of societies, cultures and knowledge that defy our “universal” foundations and research tools. Has educational knowledge developed in a way that enables us to disentangle the new education configurations? In order to respond to this question this edited volume addresses four major challenges:
to understand the denationalization of education and the need to re-conceptualize this transformation.
to uncover the agents and the tools of educational globalization, such as the knowledge producers, international organizations and role of statistics.
to explore the implications of the emerging international educational institutions and international curricula.
to understand non-western education and integrating it into western educational knowledge.
These challenges are located at the core of the production of educational knowledge and are treated from a variety of viewpoints: sociological quantitative and qualitative scholarship, ethnographic accounts, socio-historical perspectives and philosophical reflections.
This book contributes to critical thinking about globalization and educational knowledge and, at the same time, opens our spirits to the theoretical opportunities and educational enrichment that the globalization era offers. This is a compelling collection for anthropologists, sociologists, educational researchers, and anyone who seeks to understand the need of new modes of thinking about education in the global era.
CONTRIBUTORS: Robert Arnove, Aaron Benavot, Eyal Ben Ari, Roser Cussó, Yossi Dahan, Roger Dale, Oren Lallo, Julia Lerner, Orna Naftali, Julia Resnik, Susan Robertson, Philip Wexler and Yossi Yonah.