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Peter Roberts and Michael A. Peters

This book addresses key developments in higher education and research policy over the past decade. The authors pay particular attention to policy changes in New Zealand following the formation of a Labour-Alliance coalition government in 1999. From 1999 to 2008, a version of ‘Third Way’ politics has been applied in the New Zealand context. A key government goal has been to advance New Zealand as a ‘knowledge society and economy’, and education at the tertiary level has been seen as crucial in achieving this. Neoliberalism, Higher Education and Research considers the relationship between neoliberalism and the Third Way, discusses international trends in knowledge capitalism, examines performance-based research funding, critiques the rhetoric of ‘quality’ and ‘relevance’ in recent higher education policy, and assesses possibilities for critical citizenship and intellectual life in the 21st century. Much can be learned from the New Zealand experience in reflecting on policy developments in other countries, and this book will be of interest to all who ponder the future of knowledge and education in a globalised world.

Prospects of Higher Education

Globalization, Market Competition, Public Goods and the Future of the University

Series:

Edited by Simon Marginson

As common global problems accumulate, research and higher education become ever more vital. At the same time global convergence is transforming the prospects of higher education institutions. Local and national affairs are no longer the ultimate horizon, creating much scope for cross-border initiative and invention in both knowledge and university strategy. Yet the new freedoms are not experienced equally in all localities. Differences between nations are still determining. As the older barriers are stripped away this enhances the capacity of strong universities and systems to dominate the rest, though new players are emerging. There are many possible trajectories for the university.
The future is open and the 22 authors in Prospects of Higher Education explore it from three perspectives: the world as a whole, the Americas, and particular localities and regions. Moving beyond nation-centered analysis of states and markets, Prospects uses concepts of public and private goods to map the potentials for global trade and university rankings, common knowledge benefits and multilateral policy action, national stratification and the wash-back effects in systems and institutions. Broad and imaginative, methodologically innovative and policy sharp, this book has much for government and university leaders, scholars of higher education and anyone interested in public policy.