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Global Citizenship Education

Philosophy, Theory and Pedagogy

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Edited by Michael A. Peters, Alan Britton and Harry Blee

The essays in this edited collection argue that global citizenship education realistically must be set against the imperfections of our contemporary political realities. As a form of education it must actively engage in a critically informed way with a set of complex inherited historical issues that emerge out of a colonial past and the savage globalization which often perpetuates unequal power relations or cause new inequalities. The essays in the book explore these issues and the emergent world ideologies of globalism, as well as present territorial conflicts, ethnic, tribal and nationalist rivalries, problems of increasing international migration and asylum, growing regional imbalances and increasing world inequalities. Contributors to this collection, each on their own way, argues that global citizenship education needs to project new values, to reality test and debate the language, concepts and theories of global citizenship and the proto-world institutions that seek to give expression to nascent aspirations for international forms of social justice and citizen participation in world government. Many of the contributors argue that global citizenship education offers the prospect of extending the liberal ideologies of human rights and multiculturalism, and of developing a better understanding of forms of post-colonialism. One thing is sure, as the essays presented in this book demonstrate so clearly, there can be no one dominant notion of global citizenship education as notions of ‘global’, ‘citizenship’ and ‘education’ are all contested and open to further argument and revision. Global citizenship education does not name the moment of global citizenship or even its emergence so much as the hope of a form of order where the rights of the individual and of cultural groups, irrespective of race, gender, ethnicity or creed, are observed, preserved and protected by all governments in order to become the basis of citizen participation in new global spaces that we might be tempted to call global civil society.

Towards Globo Sapiens

Transforming Learners in Higher Education

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Patricia Kelly

Global and local studies show that the present growth-based approach to development is unsustainable. If we are serious about surviving the 21st century we will need graduates who are not simply 'globally portable' or even 'globally competent', but also wise global citizens, Globo sapiens. This book contributes to what educators need to know, do and be in order to support transformative learning.
The book is based on work with large, socially and culturally diverse, first-year engineering students at an Australian university of technology. It shows that reflective journals, with appropriate planning and support, can be one pillar of a transformative pedagogy which can encourage significant and even transformative attitude change in relation to gender, culture and the environment. It also offers evidence of improved communication skills and other tangible changes to counter common criticisms that such work is "airy-fairy" and irrelevant.
The author combines communication theory with critical futures thinking to provide layered understandings of how transformative learning affected students’ thinking, learning and behaviour. So the book is both a case-study and a detailed response to the personal and professional challenges that educators all over the world will face as they try to guide students in sustainable directions.

Why Interculturalisation?

A Response to the Internationalisation of Higher Education in the Global Knowledge Economy

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Xiaoping Jiang

This amazing, highly readable book breaks a new ground in revealing the dominant theories and policies that have had profound effects on the strategies to accommodate cultural diversity on university campus. Few have researched intercultural communication from macro to micro perspectives and applied a multidisciplinary approach by drawing on research from disciplines such as sociology, economics, politics, social psychology, management, communication, culture and language. This book has outlined an emerging concept of some considerable significance, interculturalisation, from a variety of contemporary perspectives, and indicated its conceptual potential in understanding the impact of higher education on globalisation, internationalisation and the knowledge economy. The book has also provided a critical assessment of the issues in globalisation and the internationalisation of higher education such as the homogenisation of cultures and the dominance of economic imperatives. In general, this book represents an original application of specialist literatures that develops certain theorisations and understandings together for the first time in a new constellation. Hence, the book provides an excellent contribution to the current interest in globalisation across disciplines, particularly to the research in intercultural communication.
It should be of great interest to philosophers, educators and researchers in the intercultural studies. This book is a significant and powerful work that is sure to invigorate interesting discussions of higher education and particularly intercultural education for years to come.
The publication of this book announces the emergence of an original approach to intercultural communication that scholars around the world will soon to appreciate.