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Narratives of Teaching for Social Justice and Community
This book incorporates art-based, partnership-oriented inquiry into social justice discourses and advances qualitative research strategies through the medium of three theoretical frameworks: phenomenology, critical ethnographic research, and poststructuralist theories. Maxine Greene's aesthetic theories motivated to create the ARtS initiative and the author explores the possibility of enhancing children’s understanding of active citizenship and community. It illustrates narratives from children in an urban context while they developed a sense of constructive community and active citizenship in an afterschool program called the ARtS (aesthetic, reflexive thoughts, & sharing) initiative.

As a qualitative methodology text, Three Approaches to Qualitative Research through the ARtS explicates theoretical tenets and research strategies in art-based research. This book shows three examples of how to connect a theoretical framework with the analysis of ethnographic data. A nexus between theory and practice enables researchers and practitioners to understand the value of aesthetic-inspired programs to foster democratic citizenship and to advance equity issues. Social justice-oriented teacher educators, qualitative researchers, and artists will explore and learn how the ARtS initiative recognizes the power of art and multiple research methodologies in imagining and representing a community differently and advancing social justice in a challenging time.
At a time when universities demand immediate and quantifiable impacts of scholarship, the voices of research participants become secondary to impact factors and the volume of research produced. Moreover, what counts as research within the academy constrains practices and methods that may more authentically articulate the phenomena being studied. When external forces limit methodological practices, research innovation slows and homogenizes.

This book aims to address the methodological, interpretive, ethical/procedural challenges and tensions within theatre-based research with a goal of elevating our field’s research practice and inquiry. Each chapter embraces various methodologies, positionalities and examples of mediation by inviting two or more leading researchers to interrogated each other’s work and, in so doing, highlighted current debates and practices in theatre-based research. Topics include: ethics, method, audience, purpose, mediation, form, aesthetics, voice, data generation, and research participants. Each chapter frames a critical dialogue between researchers that take multiple forms (dialogic interlude, research conversation, dramatic narrative, duologue, poetic exchange, etc.).

Employing Reflexive Inquiry to Explore Teacher Identity
Editor: Ellyn Lyle
Teacher identity resides in the foundational beliefs and assumptions educators have about teaching and learning. These beliefs and assumptions develop both inside and outside of the classroom, blurring the lines between the professional and the personal. Examining the development of teacher identity at this intersection requires a unique reflexive capacity.

Reflexive inquiry is both established and continually emerging. At its most basic, reflexivity refers to researchers’ consciousness of their role in and effect on both the act of doing research and arriving at research findings. In making central the role of the researcher in the research process, reflexive inquiry interrogates agency while examining philosophical notions about the nature of knowledge.

While advancements have been made in investigating the relationship between teacher knowledge and teacher practice, the research often fails to connect this meaning with self-knowledge and issues of identity. Through a consideration of these tenets, the authors in this collection embrace critical, qualitative, creative, and arts-integrated approaches to examine ways that reflexive inquiry supports studies in teacher identity. Moving between theory and lived experience, the authors individually and collectively lay bare teacher identity as negotiated while evidencing the epistemological merits of reflexive inquiry.