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This is the first biography of Barbara of Cilli (1392-1451), Hungarian, Roman-German and Bohemian queen through her marriage to King and later Emperor Sigismund of Luxembourg (1368-1437). While Emperor Sigismund has enjoyed substantial historical attention, Barbara has remained in his shadow, despite her significant political, economic, and cultural influence.

Barbara’s image is still preserved today as the "Black Queen" or the "German Messalina". She has been transformed into a mystical or even demonic figure in folklore – a prime example of the creation and functioning of historical stereotypes – yet as a historical figure she emerges as an influential and exceptional queen.
A Socio-Economic Analysis of a Religious Community in Eighteenth-Century Saxony
Based on hundreds of archival documents, Christina Petterson offers an in-depth analysis of the community building process and individual and collective subjectification practices of the Moravian Brethren in eighteenth-century Herrnhut, Eastern Germany between 1740 and 1760.
The Moravian Brethren are a Protestant group, but Petterson demonstrates the relevance of their social experiments and practices for early modernity by drawing out the socio-economic layers of the archival material. In doing so, she provides a non-religious reading of categories that become central to liberal ideology as the Moravians negotiate the transition from feudal society to early capitalism. As such The Moravian Brethren in a Time of Transition combines archival analysis with socio-economic change.
Miracle accounts provide a window into the views and conceptions of the laity, the uneducated, women, and even children, whose voices are mostly missing from other types of sources. They are not, however, simple to use. This volume offers a methodological insight into the medieval world of the miraculous. Consisting of 15 cutting-edge articles by leading scholars in the field, it provides versatile approaches to the origins, methods, and recording techniques of various types of miracle narratives. It offers fascinating case studies from across Europe, which show how miracle accounts can be used as a source for various topics such as lived religion, healing, protection, and family and gender.

Contributors are Nicole Archambeau, Leigh Ann Craig, Ildikó Csepregi, Jussi Hanska, Emilia Jamroziak, Sari Katajala-Peltomaa, Jenni Kuuliala, Iona McCleery, Jyrki Nissi, Roberto Paciocco, Donald S. Prudlo, Marika Räsänen, Jonas Van Mulder, and Louise Elizabeth Wilson.
Author: Hugh Morrison
At Christmas 1936, Presbyterian children in New Zealand raised over £400 for an x-ray machine in a south Chinese missionary hospital. From the early 1800s, thousands of children in the British world had engaged in similar activities, raising significant amounts of money to support missionary projects world-wide. But was money the most important thing? Hugh Morrison argues that children’s education was a more important motive and outcome. This is the first book-length attempt to bring together evidence from across a range of British contexts. In particular it focuses on children’s literature, the impact of imperialism and nationalism, and the role of emotions.
This book presents a collective portrait of the inhabitants of Árpádian- and Angevin-era Hungary identified by their countrymen as Rutheni. Many members of this group hailed from the lands of Halych, Chernihiv, Kyiv, and Volhynia, and migrated to Hungary under the pressure of circumstances, eventually carving out for themselves a position of prominence in the kingdom's social hierarchy and political affairs.

Drawing on a range of sources, this is the first work to make extensive use of Latin-language documents to throw light on the vicissitudes of the life of Rus’ settlers and those bearing Rus’-related names or bynames in medieval Central Europe, revealing their important role in contemporary social and political life.
Volume Editors: Terressa A. Benz and Graham Cassano
This volume places the Flint, Michigan, water contamination disaster in the context of a broader crisis of neoliberal governance in the United States. Authors from a range of disciplines (including sociology, criminal justice, anthropology, history, communications, and jurisprudence) examine the failures in Flint, but with an emphasis upon comparison, calling attention to similar trajectories for cities like Detroit and Pontiac, in Michigan, and Stockton, in California. While the studies collected here emphasize policy failures, class conflict, and racial oppression, they also attend to the resistance undertaken by Flint residents, Michiganders, and U.S. activists, as they fought for environmental and social justice.

Contributors include: Terressa A. Benz, Jon Carroll, Graham Cassano, Daniel J. Clark, Katrinell M. Davis, Michael Doan, David Fasenfest, A.E. Garrison, Peter J. Hammer, Ami Harbin, Shea Howell, Jacob Lederman, Raoul S. Lievanos, Benjamin J. Pauli, and Julie Sze.