Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 30 items for :

  • Languages and Linguistics x
  • Asian Studies x
  • Search level: Titles x
  • Status (Books): Published x
Clear All
Shī 詩 of the Ānhuī University Manuscripts
The songs of the Royal Zhōu (“Zhōu Nán” 周南) and of the Royal Shào (“Shào Nán” 召南) have formed a conceptual unit since at least the late Spring and Autumn period (771–453 BC). With this book Meyer and Schwartz provide a first complete reading of their earliest, Warring States (453–221 BC), iteration as witnessed by the Ānhuī University manuscripts. As a thought experiment, the authors seek to establish an emic reading of these songs, which they contextualise in the larger framework of studies of the Shī (Songs) and of meaning production during the Warring States period more broadly. The analysis casts light on how the Songs were used by different groups during the Warring States period.
Author: Michael Farmer
The Atlas shows for the first time the contemporary geography of the entire Tibetan Plateau, an area where major powers (China, India and Pakistan) meet in the highest landscape on earth, originally inhabited by the unique, ancient Buddhist civilization of Tibet.
Using extensive satellite imagery, the author has accurately positioned over two thousand religious locations, more than a third of which appear not to have not been previously recorded. Nearly two thousand settlements have also been accurately located and all locations are named in both Tibetan and Chinese where possible. This ancient landscape is shown in contrast to the massive physical infrastructure which has been recently imposed on it as an attempt to “Open up the West” and carry forward the Chinese “Belt and Road Initiative”. With 120 maps in full colour.
Chinese immigrants who settle in Russia’s Far East without formal instruction in the Russian language communicate with local Russians using Russian vocabulary. Each immigrant forms their language to communicate with Russians, not with family or other immigrants. The ‘single-generation languages’ that immigrants form are not replications or simplifications of Chinese or Russian. Grammatical systems formed by these speakers challenge some fundamental assumptions in early 21st-century linguistic theories. Grammatical systems of single-generation languages provide a unique window into how complex grammatical systems emerge, what are the first formal means of expression, and what are the first meanings expressed in grammatical systems. Given massive migrations in the contemporary world, single-generation languages are common, yet understudied, products of language contact.
Author: Hao Chen
This book is an outstanding work of scholarship, which builds on a long history of research and publication in this field dating to the 1890s. The author has made extensive use of Chinese sources in the original and prepared a new edition of the Old Turkic inscriptions. It also provides new views on the dating and authorship of the inscriptions. In short, it is the leading edition for scholarly use by Turkologists, but is also open to those interested in the history of the Early Turks and Medieval Central Eurasia. An essential source book and reference work.
A Study of 11th to 13th Century Tangut Records
Author: Jinbo Shi
Editor / Translator: Hansong Li
This is the first introduction to the economic history of the Tangut Empire (1038-1227). Built on a wealth of economic data and evidence, it studies the economic lives and activities, laws and institutions, trade and transactions in the “Great State White and High”. It interprets primary sources written in the mysterious Tangut cursive script: taxes, registers, and contracts, alongside archives, chronicles, and law codes. By weaving Song, Liao, and Jin materials with Khara-Khoto, Wuwei, and Dunhuang manuscripts into a historical narrative, the book offers a gateway to the outer shape and inner life of the Western Xia (Xixia) economy and society, and rethinks the Tanguts’ influence on the Hexi Corridor and the Silk Road.
Editor: Hubert Bazin
The Ricci Dictionary of Chinese Law (in Simplified Chinese) includes approximately 24,000 Chinese legal terms used by Chinese and foreign lawyers in mainland China, transcribed into pinyin and translated into English and French. The Dictionary was prepared between 2006 and 2018 by a team of French and Chinese lawyers, as well as American, Canadian, English and Australian contributors, under the guidance of the Ricci Association, in order to complete and supplement the “Grand dictionnaire Ricci de la langue chinoise” (also named “Grand Ricci”, a dictionary published in 2001 encompassing more than 300,000 terms). The Ricci Dictionary of Chinese Law aims to provide a tool for translators of Chinese legal documents, but it is also aimed at researchers, academics, students, attorneys and lawyers who have an interest in Chinese law.
This dictionary is also available online and in Traditional Chinese with English and French translations.

Le Dictionnaire Ricci du droit chinois (édition en caractères simplifiés) comprend environ 24.000 termes chinois utilisés par les juristes chinois et étrangers en Chine continentale, transcrits en pinyin et traduits en anglais et en français. Cet ouvrage a été préparé entre 2006 et 2018 par une équipe d’avocats et juristes principalement français et chinois, mais aussi américains, canadiens, britanniques et australiens, pour enrichir le Grand dictionnaire Ricci de la langue chinoise, connu sous le nom de « Grand Ricci », qui traduit plus de 300,000 termes et a été publié sous l’égide de l’Association Ricci du grand dictionnaire de la langue chinoise en 2001. Le dictionnaire Ricci du droit chinois entend servir d’instrument de travail aux traducteurs de documents juridiques, mais aussi aux chercheurs, universitaires, étudiants, avocats et juristes intéressés par le droit chinois.
Ce dictionnaire est aussi disponible en ligne et en caractères chinois traditionnels, traduit à la fois en anglais et en français.
Editor: Hubert Bazin
The Ricci Dictionary of Chinese Law (in Traditional Chinese) includes approximately 24,000 Chinese legal terms used by Chinese and foreign lawyers in mainland China, transcribed into pinyin and translated into English and French. It was prepared between 2006 and 2018 by a team of French and Chinese lawyers, as well as American, Canadian, English and Australian contributors, under the guidance of the Ricci Association, in order to complete and supplement the “Grand dictionnaire Ricci de la langue chinoise” (also named “Grand Ricci”, a dictionary published in 2001 encompassing more than 300,000 terms). The Ricci Dictionary of Chinese Law aims at providing a tool for translators of Chinese legal documents, but it is also aimed at researchers, academics, students, attorneys and lawyers who have an interest in Chinese law.
This dictionary is also available online and in Simplified Chinese with English and French translations.

Le dictionnaire Ricci du droit chinois (édition en caractères traditionnels) comprend environ 24.000 termes chinois utilisés par les juristes chinois et étrangers en Chine continentale, transcrits en pinyin et traduits en anglais et en français. Cet ouvrage a été préparé entre 2006 et 2018 par une équipe d’avocats et juristes principalement français et chinois, mais aussi américains, canadiens, britanniques et australiens, pour enrichir le Grand dictionnaire Ricci de la langue chinoise, connu sous le nom de « Grand Ricci », qui traduit plus de 300,000 termes et a été publié sous l’égide de l’Association Ricci du grand dictionnaire de la langue chinoise en 2001. Le dictionnaire Ricci du droit chinois entend servir d’instrument de travail aux traducteurs de documents juridiques, mais aussi aux chercheurs, universitaires, étudiants, avocats et juristes intéressés par le droit chinois.
Ce dictionnaire est aussi disponible en ligne et en caractères chinois simplifiés, traduit à la fois en anglais et en français.
Author: Zev Handel
In the more than 3,000 years since its invention, the Chinese script has been adapted many times to write languages other than Chinese, including Korean, Vietnamese, Japanese, and Zhuang. In Sinography: The Borrowing and Adaptation of the Chinese Script, Zev Handel provides a comprehensive analysis of how the structural features of these languages constrained and motivated methods of script adaptation. This comparative study reveals the universal principles at work in the borrowing of logographic scripts. By analyzing and explaining these principles, Handel advances our understanding of how early writing systems have functioned and spread, providing a new framework that can be applied to the history of scripts beyond East Asia, such as Sumerian and Akkadian cuneiform.
Editor: Bo Mou
From the constructive-engagement vantage point of doing philosophy of language comparatively, this anthology explores (1) how reflective elaboration of some distinct features of the Chinese language and of philosophically interesting resources concerning language in Chinese philosophy can contribute to our treatment of a range of issues in philosophy of language and (2) how relevant resources in contemporary philosophy of language can contribute to philosophical interpretations of reflectively interesting resources concerning the Chinese language and Chinese texts. The foregoing contributing fronts constitute two complementary sides of this project. This volume includes 12 contributing essays and 2 engagement-background essays which are organized into six parts on distinct issues. The anthology also includes the volume editor’s theme introduction on comparative philosophy of language and his engaging remarks for three parts.
Author: Hang Zhang
Tones are the most challenging aspect of learning Chinese pronunciation for adult learners and traditional research mostly attributes tonal errors to interference from learners’ native languages. In Second Language Acquisition of Mandarin Chinese Tones, Hang Zhang offers a series of cross-linguistic studies to argue that there are factors influencing tone acquisition that extend beyond the transfer of structures from learners’ first languages, and beyond characteristics extracted from Chinese. These factors include universal phonetic and phonological constraints as well as pedagogical issues. By examining non-native Chinese tone productions made by speakers of non-tonal languages (English, Japanese, and Korean), this book brings together theory and practice and uses the theoretical insights to provide concrete suggestions for teachers and learners of Chinese.