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Author: Jingyi Song
Denver’s Chinatown 1875-1900: Gone But Not Forgotten explores the coming of the Chinese to the Western frontier and their experiences in Denver during its early development from a supply station for the mining camps to a flourishing urban center. The complexity of race, class, immigration, politics, and economic policies interacted dynamically and influenced the life of early Chinese settlers in Denver. The Denver Riot, as a consequence of political hostility and racial antagonism against the Chinese, transformed the life of Denver’s Chinese, eventually leading to the disappearance of Denver's Chinatown. But the memory of a neighborhood that was part of the colorful and booming urban center remains.
Volume Editor: Karl Heinz Roth
Global Labour History is a latecomer to historical science. It has only developed in the last three decades. This anthology provides a comprehensive overview of the state of the art. Prominent representatives of the discipline discuss its fundamental methodological and conceptual aspects. In addition, the volume contains field and case studies from Africa and Latin America, as well as from the Middle East and China. In these studies, the local, regional and continental constitutive processes of the working class are discussed from a global-historical perspective. The anthology has been composed as a Festschrift dedicated to Marcel van der Linden, the leading theoretician of, and networker for, Global Labour History.




Volume Editors: Mary Hilson, Silke Neunsinger, and Greg Patmore
With contributions from over 30 scholars, A Global History of Consumer Co-operation surveys the origins and development of the consumer co-operative movement from the mid-nineteenth century until the present day. The contributions, covering the history of co-operation in different national contexts in Europe, the Americas, Asia and Australasia, illustrate the wide variety of forms that consumer co-operatives have taken; the different political, economic and social contexts in which they have operated; the ideological influences on their development; and the reasons for their expansion and decline at different times. The book also explores the connections between co-operatives in different parts of the world, challenging assumptions that the story of global co-operation can be traced exclusively to the 1844 Rochdale Co-operative Society.

Contributors are: Amélie Artis, Nikola Balnave, Patrizia Battilani, Johann Brazda, Susan Fitzpatrick-Behrens, María Eugenia Castelao Caruana, Kay-Wah Chan, Bernard Degen, Danièle Demoustier, Espen Ekberg, Dulce Freire, Katarina Friberg, Mary Hilson, Mary Ip, Florian Jagschitz, Pernilla Jonsson, Kim Hyung-mi, Akira Kurimoto, Simon Lambersens, Catherine C LeGrand, Ian MacPherson, Francisco José Medina-Albaladejo, Alain Mélo, Jessica Gordon Nembhard, Silke Neunsinger, Greg Patmore, Joana Dias Pereira, Michael Prinz, Siegfried Rom, Robert Schediwy, Corrado Secchi, Geert Van Goethem, Griselda Verbeke, Rachael Vorberg-Rugh, Mirta Vuotto, Anthony Webster and John Wilson.
Author: Adam Knobler
This book examines the relationship between medieval European mythologies of the non-Western world and the initial Portuguese and Spanish voyages of expansion and exploration to Africa, Asia and the Americas. From encounters with the Mongols and successor states, to the European contacts with Ethiopia, India and the Americas, as well as the concomitant Jewish notion of the Ten Lost Tribes, the volume views the Western search for distant, crusading allies through the lens of stories such as the apostolate of Saint Thomas and the stories surrounding the supposed priest-king Prester John. In doing so, Knobler weaves a broad history of early modern Iberian imperial expansion within the context of a history of cosmologies and mythologies.
Author: Sally K. Burt
At the President’s Pleasure offers a new perspective on the way the United States and China interacted during World War II. Sally K. Burt examines President Franklin Roosevelt’s methods of conducting diplomacy, particularly his tendency to centralise foreign policy-making into his own hands, as it applied to wartime Sino-US relations. By critiquing the president’s foreign policy leadership with China, Burt provides a new perspective on US diplomacy and opens the door for further exploration of contemporary methods of conducting relations between the US and China. This book, then, will interest scholars, historians, international relations specialists and practitioners and those interested in global politics, both historical and in the present day.