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Edited by Annie Guerin and Trish McMenamin

In Belonging: Rethinking Inclusive Practices to Support Well-Being and Identity, issues related to inclusive education and belonging across a range of education contexts from early childhood to tertiary education are examined and matters related to participation, policy and theory, and identity and well-being are explored. Individual chapters, which are drawn from papers presented at The Inclusive Education Summit held at the University of Canterbury, 2016, canvass a variety of topics including pedagogy, sexuality, theory, policy and practice. These topics are explored from the authors’ varying perspectives as practitioners, academics and lay-persons and also from varying international perspectives including New Zealand, South Africa and Australia.

Contributors are: Keith Ballard, Henrietta Bollinger, Hera Cook, Michael Gafffney, Annie Guerin, Fiona Henderson, Leechin Heng, Kate McAnelly, Trish McMenamin, Be Pannell, Christine Rietveld, Marie Turner, Ben Whitburn, Julie White, and Melanie Wong.

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Mijung Kim and Wolff-Michael Roth

Science educators have come to recognize children’s reasoning and problem solving skills as crucial ingredients of scientific literacy. As a consequence, there has been a concurrent, widespread emphasis on argumentation as a way of developing critical and creative minds. Argumentation has been of increasing interest in science education as a means of actively involving students in science and, thereby, as a means of promoting their learning, reasoning, and problem solving. Many approaches to teaching argumentation place primacy on teaching the structure of the argumentative genre prior to and at the beginning of participating in argumentation. Such an approach, however, is unlikely to succeed because to meaningfully learn the structure (grammar) of argumentation, one already needs to be competent in argumentation. This book offers a different approach to children’s argumentation and reasoning based on dialogical relations, as the origin of internal dialogue (inner speech) and higher psychological functions. In this approach, argumentation first exists as dialogical relation, for participants who are in a dialogical relation with others, and who employ argumentation for the purpose of the dialogical relation. With the multimodality of dialogue, this approach expands argumentation into another level of physicality of thinking, reasoning, and problem solving in classrooms. By using empirical data from elementary classrooms, this book explains how argumentation emerges and develops in and from classroom interactions by focusing on thinking and reasoning through/in relations with others and the learning environment.

Series:

Edited by Hans Christian Arnseth, Thorkild Hanghøj, Thomas Duus Henriksen, Morten Misfeldt, Robert Ramberg and Staffan Selander

We live in a time of educational transformations towards more 21st century pedagogies and learning. In the digital age children and young people need to learn critical thinking, creativity and innovation and the ability to solve complex problems and challenges. Traditional pedagogies are in crisis and many pupils experience school as both boring and irrelevant. As a response educators and researchers need to engage in transforming education through the invention of new designs in and for learning. This book explores how games can provide new ideas and new designs for future education. Computer games have become hugely popular and engaging, but as is apparent in this book, games are not magical solutions to making education more engaging, fun and relevant.

Games and Education explores new designs in and for learning and offer inspiration to teachers, technologists and researchers interested in changing educational practices. Based on contributions from Scandinavian researchers, the book highlights participatory approaches to research and practice by providing more realistic experiences and models of how games can facilitate learning in school.

The Narrative of Mathematics Teachers

Elementary School Mathematics Teachers’ Features of Education, Knowledge, Teaching and Personality

Edited by Dorit Patkin and Avikam Gazit

The issue of mathematics teaching and its impact on learners' attainments in this subject has continuously been on the public agenda. The anthology of chapters in this book consists of varied up-to-date studies of some of the best mathematics education researchers and mathematics teaching experts, exploring the varied aspects of this essential. The book depicts the elementary school mathematics teachers' world while relating to three aspects which comprise the professional environment of mathematics teachers: Teachers' education and teachers' knowledge, Teaching and Teachers' personality. The chapters are written on a level which addresses and might interest a wide readership: researchers, in-service teachers, pre-service teachers, parents and learners.

Beyond Observations

Narratives and Young Children

Susanne Garvis, Elin Eriksen Ødegaard and Narelle Lemon

This book provides important insights into narratives and young children. It is structured to help others learn more about the importance of narrative approaches and early childhood education. The first section of the book explores the concept of narrative across the current research field. The second section explores a range of different narrative methods related to young children.
Readers will discover how narrative methods empower children to be heard and respected by adults. They will also discover the importance of narrative methods in allowing a sharing of understanding, knowledge and trust in contemporary times.
Overall, the book aims to encourage readers to critically reflect on new ways of thinking about contemporary research and young children.

Projekt Frühkindliche Erziehung

Ein Lehr- und Lernbuch

Michael Obermaier, Cornelia Rosemarie Huber and Cornelia Hoffmann

Learning in the Making

Disposition and Design in Early Education

Margaret Carr, Carolyn Jones, Wendy Lee, Anne B. Smith, Kate Marshall and Judith Duncan

This book presents an international perspective on environmental educational and specifically the influence that context has on this aspect of curriculum. The focus is on environmental education both formal and non formal and the factors that impact upon its effectiveness, particularly in non-Western and non-English-speaking contexts (i.e., outside the UK, USA, Australia, NZ, etc. ). An important feature of the book is that it draws upon the experiences and research from local experts from an extremely diverse cohort across the world (25 countries and 2 regions in total). The book addresses topics such as: the development of environmental education in different countries, its implementation, the influence of political, cultural, societal or religious mores; governmental or ministerial drives; economic or other pressures driving curriculum reform; the influence of external assessment regimes on environmental education, and so on.

Shades of Globalization in Three Early Childhood Settings

Views from India, South Africa, and Canada

Ailie Cleghorn and Larry Prochner

Shades of Globalization casts an ethnographic eye on the interplay between local and global influences on the organization and activities within three early childhood settings, each of which is located in a context of rapid social change. Stemming from a four-year study of early childhood thought and practice, each of the eight chapters touches on a different aspect of the three case study preschools, one each in India, South Africa, and an aboriginal community in Canada. The authors take a critical perspective on taken-for-granted assumptions about what constitutes the most appropriate preschool experience for children, querying for example, the meaning of school readiness within local communities.
This book will appeal to those who have an interest in the diversity of children’s lives and preschool experiences throughout the world - education and social policy makers, teacher educators, teachers, pre-service student teachers, day-care workers, parents, community leaders, governmental and non-governmental organizations and consultants, early childhood program planners and evaluators, community development workers, university lecturers, and developmental psychologists.
Ailie Cleghorn is Professor of Education at Concordia University in Montreal. She teaches in the Educational Studies Masters Program and conducts research that is grounded in her field of comparative sociology of education. Earlier publications include Issues in African Education: Sociological Perspectives, with Ali A. Abdi (Palgrave-MacMillan) and Missing the Meaning: The Development and Use of Print and Non-Print Text Materials in Diverse School Settings, with Alan Peacock (Palgrave-MacMillan).
Larry Prochner is Professor of Early Childhood Education at the University of Alberta. His research centres on the historical and comparative study of education. Recent publications include The History of Early Childhood Education in Canada, Australia, and New Zealand (University of British Columbia Press), and Early Childhood Care and Education: Theory and Practice, with Prerana Mohite (Concept Publishers).
The Afterword is written by Professor Jessica Ball, School of Child and Youth Care, University of Victoria, British Columbia. Professor Ball is the Principal Investigator on projects in the Early Childhood Development Intercultural Partnerships program at the University of Victoria. She is also Coordinator of First Nations Partnership Programs - a two-year diploma program in early childhood education and youth care, delivered through partnerships with Indigenous communities and post-secondary institutions in western Canada. She has worked extensively to protect cultural diversity and support development of community-based services to promote optimal child health and development.