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Edited by Hans Christian Arnseth, Thorkild Hanghøj, Thomas Duus Henriksen, Morten Misfeldt, Robert Ramberg and Staffan Selander

We live in a time of educational transformations towards more 21st century pedagogies and learning. In the digital age children and young people need to learn critical thinking, creativity and innovation and the ability to solve complex problems and challenges. Traditional pedagogies are in crisis and many pupils experience school as both boring and irrelevant. As a response educators and researchers need to engage in transforming education through the invention of new designs in and for learning. This book explores how games can provide new ideas and new designs for future education. Computer games have become hugely popular and engaging, but as is apparent in this book, games are not magical solutions to making education more engaging, fun and relevant.

Games and Education explores new designs in and for learning and offer inspiration to teachers, technologists and researchers interested in changing educational practices. Based on contributions from Scandinavian researchers, the book highlights participatory approaches to research and practice by providing more realistic experiences and models of how games can facilitate learning in school.

Without a Margin for Error

Urban Immigrant English Language Learners in STEM

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Jeremy B. Heyman

In Without a Margin for Error, the author chronicles the journeys of young adults in an under-served urban community who are new to the English language into STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics-related) fields from high school through college. He distills lessons, themes, and policy recommendations from the trails blazed by these students toward altering the status quo around college access and STEM success for often-marginalized but highly resilient young adults with much to contribute to their new nation, their communities, and the world. While drawing on a critical ethnography of over three dozen inspiring young adults, seven students are chronicled in greater depth to bring to life crucial conversations for redefining college readiness, access, and success in STEM fields.

The Negotiated Self

Employing Reflexive Inquiry to Explore Teacher Identity

Edited by Ellyn Lyle

Teacher identity resides in the foundational beliefs and assumptions educators have about teaching and learning. These beliefs and assumptions develop both inside and outside of the classroom, blurring the lines between the professional and the personal. Examining the development of teacher identity at this intersection requires a unique reflexive capacity.

Reflexive inquiry is both established and continually emerging. At its most basic, reflexivity refers to researchers’ consciousness of their role in and effect on both the act of doing research and arriving at research findings. In making central the role of the researcher in the research process, reflexive inquiry interrogates agency while examining philosophical notions about the nature of knowledge.

While advancements have been made in investigating the relationship between teacher knowledge and teacher practice, the research often fails to connect this meaning with self-knowledge and issues of identity. Through a consideration of these tenets, the authors in this collection embrace critical, qualitative, creative, and arts-integrated approaches to examine ways that reflexive inquiry supports studies in teacher identity. Moving between theory and lived experience, the authors individually and collectively lay bare teacher identity as negotiated while evidencing the epistemological merits of reflexive inquiry.

Identity and Internationalization in Catholic Universities

Exploring Institutional Pathways in Context

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Edited by Hans de Wit, Andrés Bernasconi, Visnja Car, Fiona Hunter, Michael James and Daniela Véliz

Identity and Internationalization in Catholic Universities explores the relationship between Catholic identity, mission, and internationalization in Catholic universities of different types and located in different contexts. Internationalization is a key concern for universities working to achieve their goals in different regions of the world but without neglecting their identity. There are many universities that consider themselves related to the Roman Catholic faith and many other universities with Christian affiliations. It is well known that Catholic universities have unique missions, such as the formation of individuals inspired by a religious conviction to serve society and the church. That is why it is imperative to have empirical knowledge to help develop practical and effective policies on central themes such as internationalization, a fundamental part of many universities’ developmental strategies, while paying special attention to each university’s specific context. This book includes sixteen case studies from Latin America, the United States, the Asia Pacific, and Europe, and also includes chapters on regional perspectives on Catholic higher education as well as more specifically Jesuit higher education, the global network of La Salle universities, and internationalization in the United States, Latin America, the Asia Pacific region, and Europe.

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Edited by Christopher J. Johnstone and Li Li Ji

Over the past two decades, international cooperation in higher education has become the norm in China and around the world. To exemplify these relationships, this edited volume devotes individual chapters to case studies of China-U.S. international higher education partnerships focused on 1) Collaborative graduate programs; 2) Research collaborations; 3) Student mobility; 4) Multi-institution collaborations; 5) Cultural exchanges; and 6) Branch campuses. These case studies will illuminate the strategies, challenges, and perceived benefits of cross-national collaboration. Case studies are bookended with introductory and concluding chapters that link cooperative activities to theory on diplomacy (including Western “soft diplomacy” and Chinese five principles of “peaceful coexistence” narratives); internationalization of higher education; and reflections on student and scholar mobility between Chinese and US institutions.

#HipHopEd: The Compilation on Hip-hop Education

Volume 1: Hip-hop as Education, Philosophy, and Practice

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Edited by Christopher Emdin and Edmund S. Adjapong

The first volume of #HipHopEd: The Compilation on Hip-hop Education brings together veteran and emerging scholars, practitioners and students from a variety of fields to share their research and experiences as it relates to the use of hip-hop in educational spaces. This text extends the current literature on hip-hop and education and focuses on the philosophy of hip-hop and education, the impact that hip-hop culture has on the identity of educators, and the use of hip-hop to inform mental health practices. Through their personal and practical experiences, authors of this text will spark new and creative uses of hip-hop culture in educational spaces.

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Edited by Jill Blackmore, Marie Brennan and Lew Zipin

This book examines changing ways that academic work is governed—from outside and inside universities—in the shifting social, cultural and political contexts of new times. Chapters trace developments in institutions, national sectors, and internationally—all applying a global scope to identify significant shifts in the broader conditions of university operation. Attention is given to governance processes across all key domains of academic work: teaching, research, leadership, management and institutional organisation. Key trends are analysed, including risk management, audit culture, league tables, techniques of accountability, and more. These investigations bring forth re-conceptions of university ‘governance’ as involving increasingly distributed and networked arrays of mechanisms, affecting academic work practices, relations, values, emotional labours and identities. Ambiguities, tensions and complexities of academic work are explored; and questions are raised as to whether prevailing managerial modes of governance can address these features of university engagement with globalising contexts.

Unaccomplished Utopia

Neoconservative Dismantling of Public Higher Education in the European Union

Edited by João M. Paraskeva

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Edited by Gaële Goastellec

Which inequalities characterise today higher education’systems, which one do they produce and which one do they fight? This book answers this three sides question by developing a comprehensive approach to depict and frame inequalities in and by higher education. By doing so, it provides researchers and policies makers with a tool to think and fight inequalities.
Drawing on a multilevel and international perspective, this book analyses the inequalities issue at three levels (Access to higher education, Success in higher education and Access to academic careers as an illustration of inequalities in access to the marketplace) by using complementary disciplines and approaches. Besides national histories of higher education and their path dependencies, societal specificities and their understanding of what diversity means and how it can be measured, international pressures to admit common norms, inequalities are today thought in an always more multidimensional, qualitative way. Relying on cases studies, this book takes the reader through the contemporary complexity of higher education inequalities to finally provide him with a conceptual scheme of reading the dimensions weighting on inequalities and think the potential tools to address them.

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Edited by Tina (A.C.) Besley

Tina Besley has edited this collection which examines and critiques the ways that different countries, particularly Commonwealth and European states, assess the quality of educational research in publicly funded higher education institutions. Such assessment often ranks universities, departments and even individual academics, and plays an important role in determining the allocation of funding to support university research. Yet research is only one aspect of academic performance alongside teaching and service or administration components. The book focuses on the theoretical and practical issues that accompany the development of national and international systems of research assessment, particularly in the field of education. In our interconnected, globalised world, some of the ideas of assessment that have evolved in one country have almost inevitably travelled elsewhere especially the UK model. Consequently the book comprises an introduction, eighteen chapters that discuss the situation in ten countries, followed by a postscript. It gathers together an outstanding group of twenty-five prominent international scholars with expertise in the field of educational research and includes many with hands-on experience in the peer review process. The book is designed to appeal to a wide group of people involved as knowledge workers and knowledge managers—academics, students and policy makers - in higher education and interested in assessment and accountability mechanisms and processes.